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Salmon Rushdie

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NEWS
December 26, 1990 | TERRY PRISTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Signs emerged Tuesday that author Salman Rushdie did not placate all his opponents by disavowing portions of his controversial novel, "The Satanic Verses," as one Iranian newspaper declared the death sentence against him irrevocable, and some Muslim leaders said they will not be satisfied until he repudiates the entire book.
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NEWS
December 26, 1990 | TERRY PRISTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Signs emerged Tuesday that author Salman Rushdie did not placate all his opponents by disavowing portions of his controversial novel, "The Satanic Verses," as one Iranian newspaper declared the death sentence against him irrevocable, and some Muslim leaders said they will not be satisfied until he repudiates the entire book.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A planned reading from Salmon Rushdie's controversial novel "Satanic Verses" has been called off in Vienna by a group of Austrian writers because of death and bomb threats. The group planned to hold the reading and discussion in conjunction with an Austrian students organization. Students and two Iranians due to take part reportedly received more than 25 death and bomb threats. Iran's spiritual leader Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini ordered Rushdie's death two months ago, saying that "Satanic Verses" blasphemes the Prophet Mohammed.
BOOKS
January 7, 1990
I must protest your printing of the social-activist diatribe posing as literary criticism that Alejandro Morales spewed out against "The Wedding," by Mary Helen Ponce (Book Review, Nov. 19). Aside from wasting valuable space, it was cruel and irresponsible of you to allow this ethnic paranoiac to savage the efforts of a first-time novelist in such a shallow, biased and self-serving fashion. . . . I believe that Ms. Ponce is aware of the technique of effectively ridiculing negative stereotypes by simply presenting an accurate picture of them.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1990 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
Television will resemble radio this weekend with plenty of news, talk and a taste of Halloween. CBS "Sunday Morning" will provide some of the news at 8 a.m. on Channels 2 and 8 as the show pays tribute to the 45th anniversary of the founding of the United Nations and the world peace organization's renewed influence and effectiveness during recent world crises. Meanwhile, "60 Minutes," Sunday at 7 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1991 | GERALD MARZORATI, Gerald Marzorati is senior editor of Harper's Magazine
The murder in Tokyo late last week of Hitoshi Igarashi, translator of the Japanese edition of "The Satanic Verses," which followed the July 3 stabbing in Milan of Ettore Capriolo, the Italian edition's translator, has elicited no comment, angry or otherwise, from the White House or Downing Street, the Elysee Palace or U.N. headquarters. The words terror and freedom , so often used by Western leaders, are deemed not to pertain in this matter.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2012 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
Susan Sarandon and hotelier Andre Balazs sit side-by-side watching Pasadena's 16-year-old Olympic pingpong prodigy Erica Wu battle her opponent in a heated game of table tennis. Their eyes follow the tiny white ball, back and forth, back and forth. A breathless announcer in a tacky gold jacket tells the crowd, “It takes a royal couple like Andre and Susan to make this thing happen! I've never seen this in the history of table tennis!” Indeed, this is a rare moment for pingpong, which until a few years ago was associated with dank basements and cheap beer.
NEWS
March 18, 1989 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Times Staff Writer
The seed was planted in the mid-'70s when Margaret Burk asked Adela Rogers St. Johns, the veteran journalist and best-selling author, if there was something she'd still like to accomplish. St. Johns, then in her 80s and interested in encouraging more people to read, responded by saying, "I would like to have a literary group." The result of that conversation became Adela Rogers St.
NEWS
December 23, 1990 | DOUGLAS GRANT MINE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A strange and powerful force draws the scattered people back to this mountainside. Some say it is their own blood within its soil that beckons. Gloria, a peasant wife and mother, has returned. This is where her parents buried her umbilical cord. Dimas, a guerrilla commander, has returned. This is where a field doctor buried the bullet-torn piece of intestine that he removed from Dimas using a razor blade for a scalpel.
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