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Salmon

BUSINESS
January 27, 2010 | By Andrea Chang
Target Corp. said Tuesday that it had eliminated all farmed salmon from its fresh, frozen and smoked seafood sections at stores nationwide. This decision includes national brands and Target's own Archer Farms and Market Pantry labels. All salmon sold under Target-owned brands will now be wild-caught Alaskan salmon; the company also said sushi made with farm-raised salmon would be made with wild-caught salmon by the end of the year. The discount giant said it wanted to ensure that its salmon was "sourced in a sustainable way that helps to preserve abundance, species health and doesn't harm local habitats."
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FOOD
June 23, 2012 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times Restaurant Critic
When I was in college, breakfast of toasted bagel, cream cheese and lox eaten with the Sunday paper spread all over the table seemed like a wonderful luxury. Later I discovered the nuances of gum-free cream cheese and the bialys and Nova from Russ & Daughters and Barney Greengrass in New York. (Barney Greengrass has an outpost on the top floor of Barneys New York in Beverly Hills.) Satiny smoked salmon or other fish can be enjoyed other ways as well. Here are a few places to find superior smoked fish in the L.A. area.
NEWS
August 2, 2011 | By Andrew Seidman
A coalition of nearly 30 organizations in the animal agriculture industry sent a letter to the heads of the House and Senate on Tuesday, asking lawmakers not to intervene as the Food and Drug Administration considers whether to approve genetically engineered salmon as food. The letter comes more than a month after the House approved an amendment, by voice acclamation, to an appropriations bill that would strip the FDA of funding to study the salmon. On July 15, members of the House and Senate sent letters to the FDA asking it to abandon its consideration of modified salmon as food, and threatened to propose legislation to bar further study of the fish if the agency does not comply.
FOOD
December 28, 2012
Total time: 40 minutes The delicate corn latkes that Joachim Splichal serves at Patina have been on the menu since the day the doors opened. Splichal layers them with fresh marinated salmon, but smoked salmon can be the perfect replacement. They are served with a sour cream sauce. SOUR CREAM-CHIVE SAUCE 1 cup sour cream 1 red bell pepper, roasted and diced 1 tablespoon minced chives LATKES 3 cups fresh or frozen corn kernels (5 to 6 ears) Butter 1 1/2 tablespoons minced shallots 1 cup heavy whipping cream 2/3 cup whole milk 2 eggs 1 cup unbleached flour 1 teaspoon baking powder Salt 2 tablespoons minced chives 20 paper-thin slices smoked salmon 1/4 cup chopped chives SOUR CREAM-CHIVE SAUCE Blend sour cream, bell pepper and chives in small bowl.
NATIONAL
September 12, 2009 | Associated Press
In an effort to protect endangered and threatened Pacific salmon, the Environmental Protection Agency announced new limits Friday on three pesticides that are commonly used on Western farms. The restrictions apply to the use of chlorpyrifos, diazinon and malathion near salmon waters in Washington, California, Oregon and Idaho. The chemicals have been found by the U.S. Geological Survey to interfere with salmon's sense of smell, making it harder for them to find food, avoid predators and return to native waters to spawn, according to federal biologists.
NATIONAL
September 16, 2009 | Kim Murphy
Fisheries managers announced Tuesday that they would enhance but not significantly alter the government's current strategy for saving salmon from extinction in the rivers of the Pacific Northwest, drawing criticism from conservationists. The long-awaited review left intact key components of the George W. Bush administration's controversial 2008 "biological opinion," which concluded that salmon could be kept alive on the Columbia and Snake rivers without removing dams or significantly increasing water flows.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2010 | By Jill Leovy
Despite a historic shutdown of coastal salmon fishing, the number of salmon returning to the Sacramento River is collapsing, according to preliminary data released by the Pacific Fishery Management Council. Returning fall Chinook salmon numbers have dropped to their lowest level since monitoring began in the 1970s, the report said. The finding means it is unlikely that fishing will resume this year, disappointing fishermen who have eked out the last two years on disaster aid, waiting for salmon fishing bans to be lifted.
BUSINESS
December 28, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Smoked salmon sold at Wal-Mart's Sam's Club stores nationwide is being recalled in 42 states, including California, and Puerto Rico amid listeria concerns. The fish was produced by a Miami subsidiary of Multiexport Foods Inc. in conjunction with Tampa Bay Fisheries Inc. The companies are pulling the product “with an overabundance of caution,” according to a Wal-Mart statement . The listeria monocytogenes bacteria - which can cause fatal infections in the elderly, the young and those with weak immune systems, and lead to fever, nausea and diarrhea in other victims - was discovered during a standard lab test on a shipment of the salmon that hadn't been distributed to stores, according to Wal-Mart.
SCIENCE
October 25, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
When the Sacramento River runs high after a big storm, floodwaters rush into the Yolo Bypass, which carries them away from California's capital city to the river's downstream delta. In most years, the floodwaters quickly drain away. But what would happen if the bypass was full of water for longer periods when migrating salmon could use it? Would that provide salmon with the benefits of a natural floodplain and boost the struggling populations of Central Valley Chinook? A team of researchers conducting experiments in the bypass are coming up with some encouraging results.  In February, they released thousands of juvenile Chinook salmon from a hatchery in two areas of harvested rice fields that served as bypass research plots.
NEWS
September 8, 1995 | Associated Press
A federal judge extended a ban on commercial chinook salmon fishing in southeast Alaska on Thursday, saying Alaska had failed to make a good-faith effort to abide by the 10-year-old Pacific Salmon Treaty. U.S. District Judge Barbara Rothstein's preliminary injunction, issued at the request of Pacific Northwest Indian tribes and the states of Washington and Oregon, extends the ban through Sept. 30. Rothstein ruled that Alaska was jeopardizing the salmon run by overfishing.
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