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Salmon

NATIONAL
February 28, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
Talk to a fisherman on the West Coast and he'll give you a hard-luck story.  The once-glorious salmon runs of the Pacific Northwest are mostly shadows of what they once were, some threatened with outright extinction, and few rivers have had as many troubles as the Klamath, as it runs from southern Oregon into Northern California. Once the third-most productive salmon river system in the U.S., the Klamath last year saw only about 233,000 fall chinook - the big, meaty salmon prized by fishermen - headed back to spawn.  In 2008, the number was only 68,000.
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FOOD
January 12, 2012
  Total time: 1½ hours Servings: 8 Note: Adapted from "Party Like a Culinista" by Jill Donenfeld and Josetth Gordon, who note: "Once you've marinated the fish and put it on a baking dish, pour the extra marinade into a saucepan over medium heat for about 10 minutes to let it reduce slightly. When the fish is ready and out of the oven, ladle some extra marinade on top. " For a vegan dish, substitute tempeh or portobello mushrooms for the fish. 1/4 cup capers packed in brine 1/4 cup white miso 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil 2 tablespoons agave syrup 1/2 cup mirin 2 pounds salmon filet, pin bones removed 1. In a medium bowl, crush the drained capers with a fork.
FOOD
January 5, 2012
Little twists in recipes can make a big difference, and this is a perfect example. The combination of salmon served on a bed of lentils, bacon and bitter greens is good, but what makes the dish great is a little trick Russ Parsons learned from Thomas Keller — "squeegeeing" the salmon skin with the back of a knife to thoroughly dry it out before cooking. The result is skin as crisp as a wafer and the perfect counterpoint to the fish's moist flesh. Crisp-skinned salmon with lentils, bacon and dandelion greens Total time: 1 hour, 35 minutes Servings: 6 to 8 6 to 8 salmon fillets (1½ to 2 pounds total)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2011 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
Removing four hydroelectric dams and restoring habitat on Northern California's Klamath River would significantly boost the watershed's chinook salmon population and the commercial salmon catch, according to several dozen federal reports released Wednesday. The U.S. Interior Department will rely on the documents to decide whether the dams should be torn down. Removal of the structures would open upper portions of the Klamath to struggling salmon populations that have been blocked from historic spawning grounds for nearly a century.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2011 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
A judge ordered a federal agency Tuesday to rewrite protections for migrating salmon that have reduced water shipments from Northern California, concluding that some of the pumping curbs were based on "equivocal or bad science. " But in a mixed ruling, U.S. District Judge Oliver Wanger also said that the National Marine Fisheries Service was justified in finding that government water operations that export supplies from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta jeopardize dwindling populations of chinook salmon and several other fish on the endangered species list.
NATIONAL
September 17, 2011 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
In a deep turquoise pool in a gorge of steep granite and thick Douglas fir, dozens of salmon swam fitfully. Swirling and slow, they made their way up one side of the riverbed, only to run into the steep concrete face of Elwha Dam — the formidable barrier that for nearly 100 years has cut off most of the Elwha River from the salmon that traditionally populated it. Some primordial genetic imprint makes these fish keep trying. Nurtured in hatcheries for years, supplemented by the few wild fish that managed to spawn in the limited five-mile stretch of river left below the dam, these 20-pound chinook still fling themselves up the river.
SPORTS
August 20, 2011 | By Kevin Baxter
Jim Thome hit more than half his 600 home runs for his first team, the Cleveland Indians, making him the career leader for that storied franchise. Here is a list of all-time home run leaders for the 30 big league franchises: Angels; Tim Salmon, 299 Dodgers; Duke Snider, 389 Arizona; Luis Gonzalez, 224 Atlanta; Hank Aaron, 733 Baltimore; Cal Ripken, 431 Boston; Ted Williams, 521 Chicago Cubs; Sammy Sosa, 545...
NEWS
August 17, 2011 | By Andrew Seidman
A group of Democratic Massachusetts lawmakers asked the Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday to continue using its science-based approach in its approval process of biotechnology applications, intensifying the political debate over the FDA's consideration of genetically engineered salmon for food. Although Reps. Edward Markey, Barney Frank and James McGovern did not advocate for or against genetically engineered salmon, they did implore FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg to conclude the approval process.
FOOD
August 11, 2011 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times
I'm flying through my summer wines, already out of rosés. But I've got a new candidate for house wine: the 2010 rosado or rosé from renowned Rioja producer Bodegas Muga. It's salmon-pink in color, more structured than a typical rosé, has slightly higher alcohol and acidity and, of course, is meant to be drunk young. A blend of mostly Garnacha (Grenache) with Viura and Tempranillo, Graciano or Mazuelo, depending on the year, it's scented with wild strawberries and cherries.
NEWS
August 2, 2011 | By Andrew Seidman
A coalition of nearly 30 organizations in the animal agriculture industry sent a letter to the heads of the House and Senate on Tuesday, asking lawmakers not to intervene as the Food and Drug Administration considers whether to approve genetically engineered salmon as food. The letter comes more than a month after the House approved an amendment, by voice acclamation, to an appropriations bill that would strip the FDA of funding to study the salmon. On July 15, members of the House and Senate sent letters to the FDA asking it to abandon its consideration of modified salmon as food, and threatened to propose legislation to bar further study of the fish if the agency does not comply.
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