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Salomon Bros Inc

BUSINESS
December 19, 1994 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 16 years at Salomon Bros., William D. Rifkin has had a front-row seat to some of the best-known corporate takeovers and massive bankruptcies of the past decade. But being called in to help straighten out Orange County's multibillion-dollar financial mess was another matter. "I am used to looking at the balance and income sheets of a corporation. The finances of a municipality are completely different," Rifkin said in a recent telephone interview.
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BUSINESS
December 17, 1994 | TOM PETRUNO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Salomon Bros. unloaded $1 billion in securities from Orange County's bankrupt investment fund on Friday--double Thursday's pace--while cautioning that the hardest sales lie ahead. In the second day of the court-approved liquidation process, Salomon auctioned longer-term conventional bonds with a principal value of $566 million, and also sold the first of the portfolio's complex "derivative" securities: $440 million in foreign bank-issued "structured" certificates of deposit.
BUSINESS
December 14, 1994 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former state Treasurer Thomas W. Hayes, now a consultant to Orange County, and William D. Rifkin, a managing director of mergers and acquisitions with Salomon Bros. in New York, laid out their strategy Tuesday for liquidating the county's investment pool. When they are done, Rifkin promised, "it's all going to go."
BUSINESS
December 31, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Securities and Exchange Commission said it fined Thomas Murphy $300,000 and permanently barred him from participating in Treasury auction bids. The agency took the action against Murphy for his role in a bidding scandal that rocked the Wall Street firm in 1991. In its complaint, the SEC alleged that Murphy submitted false customer bids in three auctions of Treasury securities and caused Salomon Bros. Inc. to create false records.
BUSINESS
December 15, 1993 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge Tuesday sentenced the key figure in the 1991 Salomon Bros. Treasury bond scandal to four months in prison and a $30,000 fine. U.S. District Judge Pierre N. Leval in Manhattan directed Paul W. Mozer, 38, the former head of Salomon's government bond trading desk, to begin serving the sentence in a minimum security prison Jan. 18.
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