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NEWS
January 25, 2011 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
The assertion that autism is linked to childhood vaccinations has run and run, even as study after study has failed to find such a link, either with MMR vaccines or ones containing thimerosal,  an organic compound that contains mercury. One prominent article fingering thimerosal  was  “Deadly Immunity,”  written by Robert F. Kennedy Jr. , and co-published by Salon.com and Rolling Stone (which fact-checked it) in 2005. Salon on Jan. 16 announced it was removing the story from its website.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2013
The very funny Maria Bamford earned "Best of the Web" from Salon.com and the Harvard Crimson for her web series, "The Maria Bamford Show. " She was also named one of Variety's "Top Ten Comics to Watch" and Comedy Central viewers voted her as one of their "Top Ten Favorite Comics. " See what all the buzz is about by catching her live. Hollywood Improv, 8162 Melrose Ave., L.A. 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. Sat. $20. (323) 651-2583; http://www.hollywood.improv.com.
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BUSINESS
October 4, 2000 | Reuters
The chief of struggling Internet media company Salon.com called on his Web media peers to share marketing efforts with the goal of limiting their reliance on online advertising services firms and cutting costs. "I do think it's silly for us to keep reinventing the wheel," Salon.com Chairman and Editor in Chief David Talbot told an audience of Internet professionals at a New York conference.
NEWS
January 25, 2011 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
The assertion that autism is linked to childhood vaccinations has run and run, even as study after study has failed to find such a link, either with MMR vaccines or ones containing thimerosal,  an organic compound that contains mercury. One prominent article fingering thimerosal  was  “Deadly Immunity,”  written by Robert F. Kennedy Jr. , and co-published by Salon.com and Rolling Stone (which fact-checked it) in 2005. Salon on Jan. 16 announced it was removing the story from its website.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2013
The very funny Maria Bamford earned "Best of the Web" from Salon.com and the Harvard Crimson for her web series, "The Maria Bamford Show. " She was also named one of Variety's "Top Ten Comics to Watch" and Comedy Central viewers voted her as one of their "Top Ten Favorite Comics. " See what all the buzz is about by catching her live. Hollywood Improv, 8162 Melrose Ave., L.A. 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. Sat. $20. (323) 651-2583; http://www.hollywood.improv.com.
BUSINESS
June 8, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Salon.com, which runs a money-losing Web news magazine, unveiled plans to fire 13 employees, or about 9% of its work force, in a bid to cut expenses by 20% and move toward profitability. San Francisco-based Salon.com also said it plans to spend less on freelance writers and marketing. The plans were announced after the close of regular U.S. trading. Salon.com shares, which have fallen about 58% this year, rose 9 cents to close at $2.13 on Nasdaq.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2001 | Reuters
Salon.com launched a subscription service that offers premium content, including what it calls "erotic art and photography," for a $30 annual fee. The premium service is designed to bring in additional revenue for Salon, which has depended mostly on advertising to support its free Internet magazine. Salon's business has suffered along with many Internet content sites, which have lost some of their original dot-com advertisers.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2000 | CHARLES PILLER
'Pure-play" news and information Web sites--exclusively online rather than offshoots from print or broadcast journalism--often seem to model themselves on USA Today: Most stories work best in a few paragraphs, plus a colorful chart. Such sites, which are all bright lights and colored buttons, engender a click-here culture that tends to parse, summarize or list-ify everything, leaving little screen real estate for reflection.
BUSINESS
April 8, 1999 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Well, a small Bay Area company that pioneered the now-widespread concept of online discussion communities, has been acquired by Salon.com, a leading Internet magazine. Terms of the deal were not disclosed. Salon purchased the Sausalito-based company from Rosewood Stone Group, an investment firm headed by Bruce Katz, the founder of Rockport Shoes.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2003 | Michael Hiltzik
Salon.com is the type of enterprise that by its character attracts far more media attention than its size alone would warrant, like Pixar Animation Studios or Krispy Kreme Doughnuts Inc. We're talking, after all, about a company with $4 million in annual revenue, delisted shares trading in the low hundredths of a point and no record of profit, ever.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2003 | Michael Hiltzik
Salon.com is the type of enterprise that by its character attracts far more media attention than its size alone would warrant, like Pixar Animation Studios or Krispy Kreme Doughnuts Inc. We're talking, after all, about a company with $4 million in annual revenue, delisted shares trading in the low hundredths of a point and no record of profit, ever.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2001 | Reuters
Salon.com launched a subscription service that offers premium content, including what it calls "erotic art and photography," for a $30 annual fee. The premium service is designed to bring in additional revenue for Salon, which has depended mostly on advertising to support its free Internet magazine. Salon's business has suffered along with many Internet content sites, which have lost some of their original dot-com advertisers.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2000 | CHARLES PILLER
'Pure-play" news and information Web sites--exclusively online rather than offshoots from print or broadcast journalism--often seem to model themselves on USA Today: Most stories work best in a few paragraphs, plus a colorful chart. Such sites, which are all bright lights and colored buttons, engender a click-here culture that tends to parse, summarize or list-ify everything, leaving little screen real estate for reflection.
BUSINESS
October 4, 2000 | Reuters
The chief of struggling Internet media company Salon.com called on his Web media peers to share marketing efforts with the goal of limiting their reliance on online advertising services firms and cutting costs. "I do think it's silly for us to keep reinventing the wheel," Salon.com Chairman and Editor in Chief David Talbot told an audience of Internet professionals at a New York conference.
BUSINESS
June 8, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Salon.com, which runs a money-losing Web news magazine, unveiled plans to fire 13 employees, or about 9% of its work force, in a bid to cut expenses by 20% and move toward profitability. San Francisco-based Salon.com also said it plans to spend less on freelance writers and marketing. The plans were announced after the close of regular U.S. trading. Salon.com shares, which have fallen about 58% this year, rose 9 cents to close at $2.13 on Nasdaq.
BUSINESS
April 8, 1999 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Well, a small Bay Area company that pioneered the now-widespread concept of online discussion communities, has been acquired by Salon.com, a leading Internet magazine. Terms of the deal were not disclosed. Salon purchased the Sausalito-based company from Rosewood Stone Group, an investment firm headed by Bruce Katz, the founder of Rockport Shoes.
HEALTH
September 1, 2008 | Rahul K. Parikh, Special to The Times
Recently, one of my colleagues, a pediatric gastroenterologist, told me about a teenage boy who had come to see him because of severe stomach pain he'd had for about two months. The boy had been referred by his primary care doctor, who had evaluated him for several possible causes, including infections and ulcers. That doctor had also recommended or prescribed a variety of medications to relieve the pain, but to no avail. The specialist performed an endoscopy, in which a camera is inserted into a patient's esophagus and down into the stomach and upper part of the small intestine.
IMAGE
February 8, 2014 | By Melissa Magsaysay
Los Angeles' temperate climate means that it is manicure-pedicure season all year long. So it's no wonder that nail salons in Southern California are big business, peppering nearly every strip mall and street corner to rival the ubiquity of Starbucks. The nail industry in the U.S. reached $7.47 billion from 2012-13, according to Nails Magazine, and the California Healthy Nail Salon Collaborative says there are around 1,900 nail salons in Los Angeles County. Most offer a quick mani/pedi for the palatable price of around $25; another $12 will often buy a 15-minute shoulder massage.
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