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Salon Com Company

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BUSINESS
August 10, 1999
Online magazine Salon.com, which recently went public, reported a fiscal first-quarter net loss, including an $11.5-million one-time noncash preferred dividend, of $16.1 million, or $10.10 per share, compared with a loss of $1.4 million, or $3.75, a year ago. Revenue rose to $1 million from $408,000. * Shares of Santa Monica-based Stamps.com Inc. fell 12% after an early rally on news that the U.S.
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BUSINESS
April 26, 2001 | Reuters
Salon.com launched a subscription service that offers premium content, including what it calls "erotic art and photography," for a $30 annual fee. The premium service is designed to bring in additional revenue for Salon, which has depended mostly on advertising to support its free Internet magazine. Salon's business has suffered along with many Internet content sites, which have lost some of their original dot-com advertisers.
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BUSINESS
April 26, 2001 | Reuters
Salon.com launched a subscription service that offers premium content, including what it calls "erotic art and photography," for a $30 annual fee. The premium service is designed to bring in additional revenue for Salon, which has depended mostly on advertising to support its free Internet magazine. Salon's business has suffered along with many Internet content sites, which have lost some of their original dot-com advertisers.
BUSINESS
December 21, 2000 | Associated Press
Salon.com announced a 20% cut in its work force and warned that its fourth-quarter losses would be double previous expectations. The online media company also said Andrew Ross, one of its co-founders, has resigned to spend more time with his family. San Francisco-based Salon said it would lay off 25 people and close satellite offices in Los Angeles, Chicago and Atlanta.
BUSINESS
December 21, 2000 | Associated Press
Salon.com announced a 20% cut in its work force and warned that its fourth-quarter losses would be double previous expectations. The online media company also said Andrew Ross, one of its co-founders, has resigned to spend more time with his family. San Francisco-based Salon said it would lay off 25 people and close satellite offices in Los Angeles, Chicago and Atlanta.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2000 | JAMES PELTZ and MICHAEL HILTZIK
Salon.com (SALN) Jim: Don't buy Mike: Don't buy * Mike: Today we get to talk about one of my favorite magazines, Jim. Jim: Playboy? Mike: Did I hear you say Field & Stream? But no, I'm talking about Salon.com, the online magazine. I think it's the premier general information magazine on the Web. It is sprightly, well-written, impolite, always compelling. Its topics include politics, entertainment and technology, and it was founded by a bunch of refugees from the San Francisco Examiner.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1999 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the most interesting stories unfolding at Internet magazine Salon.com these days is the online magazine's own upcoming stock offering. The San Francisco-based firm aims to raise $30 million in an initial public offering tentatively scheduled for Friday, an ambitious goal for a company that at its core is a political magazine with meager ad revenue and uncertain prospects for profitability.
BUSINESS
September 1, 2000
Investment banker William Hambrecht, head of W.R. Hambrecht & Co., said he has a 6.2% stake in online news company Salon.com, a show of support for a beleaguered stock that his firm brought public in 1999. Salon's shares (ticker symbol: SALN) added 3.1 cents to $1.97 on Nasdaq.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2001 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A surge in the stock price of Peet's Coffee & Tea since its initial public offering last Thursday may be making the company's investors happy, but it is raising new questions about the special auction system used to sell the deal. Shares of Peet's, an Emeryville, Calif.-based coffee producer and retailer, more than doubled in the days after its IPO, which was priced at $8 a share through the "OpenIPO" system developed by online investment bank W.R. Hambrecht & Co.
BUSINESS
November 15, 2010 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
In a bold challenge to its rivals, Facebook Inc. is launching a new messaging service for its more than half a billion users, setting off a battle that could shape the future of communication on the Internet. Facebook Messages will meld the three major forms of communication ? e-mail, instant messages and text messages ? so that users can manage all their communications through a single inbox on their personal computer or mobile device. The common gateway will be an "@facebook.
BUSINESS
September 1, 2000
Investment banker William Hambrecht, head of W.R. Hambrecht & Co., said he has a 6.2% stake in online news company Salon.com, a show of support for a beleaguered stock that his firm brought public in 1999. Salon's shares (ticker symbol: SALN) added 3.1 cents to $1.97 on Nasdaq.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2000 | JAMES PELTZ and MICHAEL HILTZIK
Salon.com (SALN) Jim: Don't buy Mike: Don't buy * Mike: Today we get to talk about one of my favorite magazines, Jim. Jim: Playboy? Mike: Did I hear you say Field & Stream? But no, I'm talking about Salon.com, the online magazine. I think it's the premier general information magazine on the Web. It is sprightly, well-written, impolite, always compelling. Its topics include politics, entertainment and technology, and it was founded by a bunch of refugees from the San Francisco Examiner.
BUSINESS
August 10, 1999
Online magazine Salon.com, which recently went public, reported a fiscal first-quarter net loss, including an $11.5-million one-time noncash preferred dividend, of $16.1 million, or $10.10 per share, compared with a loss of $1.4 million, or $3.75, a year ago. Revenue rose to $1 million from $408,000. * Shares of Santa Monica-based Stamps.com Inc. fell 12% after an early rally on news that the U.S.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1999 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the most interesting stories unfolding at Internet magazine Salon.com these days is the online magazine's own upcoming stock offering. The San Francisco-based firm aims to raise $30 million in an initial public offering tentatively scheduled for Friday, an ambitious goal for a company that at its core is a political magazine with meager ad revenue and uncertain prospects for profitability.
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