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BUSINESS
June 29, 1998 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Salon magazine debuted on the Internet in 1995, it took advantage of the new medium by inviting readers to discuss--electronically, of course--whether magazines on the Web are a good idea. "Not this one," came the flaming first reply. "The subject range is too broad, the depth of all of the pieces is far too shallow, and this will only get worse as readers chime in from all directions." Since then, Salon has done a lot to quiet those early critics.
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NEWS
September 30, 1998 | Associated Press
The Washington bureau chief of Salon has quit in a disagreement over the Internet magazine's decision to reveal Rep. Henry J. Hyde's long-ago extramarital affair. "There was no public issue involved" in the Illinois Republican's conduct, Jonathan Broder said in an interview Tuesday, one day after he resigned.
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NEWS
September 30, 1998 | Associated Press
The Washington bureau chief of Salon has quit in a disagreement over the Internet magazine's decision to reveal Rep. Henry J. Hyde's long-ago extramarital affair. "There was no public issue involved" in the Illinois Republican's conduct, Jonathan Broder said in an interview Tuesday, one day after he resigned.
BUSINESS
June 29, 1998 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Salon magazine debuted on the Internet in 1995, it took advantage of the new medium by inviting readers to discuss--electronically, of course--whether magazines on the Web are a good idea. "Not this one," came the flaming first reply. "The subject range is too broad, the depth of all of the pieces is far too shallow, and this will only get worse as readers chime in from all directions." Since then, Salon has done a lot to quiet those early critics.
BUSINESS
April 20, 1999 | Bloomberg News
* Salon Internet Inc., which runs the Salon online magazine and Web sites focusing on books and other topics, filed to sell a 23% stake to new investors through an initial stock offering. The San Francisco-based media company, which plans to change its name to Salon.com, filed to sell 2.5 million common shares for $10.50 to $13.50 apiece.
NEWS
May 16, 2013 | By Alice Short
 Sure, David Beckham has announced his retirement from soccer, but we assume his career as an international style icon will continue - including, we hope, his role as an underwear model for H&M. We appreciate Beckham's long-time embrace of metrosexual style (Salon magazine declared him the ultimate "metrosexual") and recall, fondly, his braided hair, sarongs and mohawk.  And we're guessing that his face will continue to grace the covers of magazines such as Esquire and “W.” Will he follow his wife, Victoria, into the fashion design world?
NEWS
February 8, 1991 | CINDY LaFAVRE YORKS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Manhattan supermodel Cindy Crawford may be blessed with good genes, but even she pays a high price for beauty. She spends $200 to work out with a personal trainer twice a week. Monthly manicures and pedicures and twice-monthly massages are also routine. Although Crawford says she couldn't begin to estimate the yearly cost of these services, it could easily exceed $4,000, based on prices at leading New York salons.
NEWS
February 26, 1992 | CINDY LaFAVRE YORKS
The color of money seems more important than the color of hair these days. Cost-conscious consumers don't want to tint their tresses anymore, at least not as often as they once did. "Now, when we suggest color to clients who haven't had it done, many are reluctant because of the upkeep," says Robert Snaith, co-owner of Taboo Salon in Los Angeles. Keeping up color requires time and money: Single-color root retouching costs $35 to $50 and must be repeated about every six weeks.
OPINION
April 7, 2002
Re "Pupils Shunted to Vocational Ed Fear It Can Derail College Dreams," March 27: Where is it etched in stone that students must go to college? Do you want us to help some students compete in the work force or pressure all of them to go to college? Students in the cosmetology field can make up to $30 an hour, according to American Salon magazine's Green Book 2000. American Salon also indicated that the cosmetology field is one of the top entrepreneurial fields in the world. I am a product of the Regional Occupational Program cosmetology classes.
BUSINESS
May 10, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
Abercrombie & Fitch, the clothing retailer, has caught flak in recent days for controversial comments made in 2006 by its chief executive. The image-conscious company does not make or sell women's clothing in any size above large, which is an issue for some. Its biggest size in women's pants is a 10. A petition on Change.org to pressure the company into changing that policy had drawn 3,674 supporters.  There's also an open letter by a blogger at the Huffington Post addressed to Chief Executive Michael S. Jeffries describing the reasons she won't let her daughters buy Abercrombie & Fitch clothes anymore.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
Abercrombie & Fitch Chief Executive Michael S. Jeffries has finally addressed criticism regarding controversial comments he made during a 2006 interview that have resurfaced and gone viral over the last week. The clothing retailer has avoided commenting on the issue. But anger continues to mount online against Jeffries and Abercrombie, particularly its strategy of not making women's clothing in any size above large. In a statement issued Thursday, Jeffries falls short of an apology, instead saying he regrets that his “choice of words was interpreted in a manner that has caused offense.” At issue is an interview that Jeffries, 68, had with Salon magazine in 2006 in which he described Abercrombie's target market.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1999 | ERIKA MILVY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I'm the king of the world--wide Web!" crowed Colin Needham upon acceptance of his third Webby Award for the evening. Racking up two trophies for Amazon.com and one more for the Internet Movie Database, Needham said it all with his allotted five-word acceptance speech. (Well, actually he used eight.) The five-worder has become a quirky bit of mandatory brevity that distinguishes the Webby Award ceremony, now in its third year, from its more filibustering counterparts.
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