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OPINION
June 8, 1986
My worst fears that the Reagan Administration was never really interested in concrete arms agreements with the Soviet Union were confirmed by statements made by Secretary of State George P. Shultz and Defense Secretary Weinberger that the United States is no longer abiding by the 1979 Strategic Arms Limitation Treaty (SALT II) and has rejected Soviet efforts to win a long-term commitment to the existing 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty. In my opinion the real reasons behind this negative and dangerous attitude is that the right-wing elements in the Reagan Administration are more interested in securing profits for the missile manufacturers than acting for the security of the American people, who are being pushed to the bring of a nuclear holocaust by this acceleration of the arms race.
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OPINION
December 27, 1987
The news carried in your columns Wednesday that the Midgetman program has set the Pentagon and the liberals at odds in an unusual way is not all that inexplicable. It is only more evidence of how the Star Wars project has perverted the logic of the whole defense program. It began long since, when Lt. Gen. Abrahamson, who runs Star Wars, announced peevishly that the Soviets would have to stay within the SALT II limits if SDI was to be feasible. That was just before Reagan denounced SALT II, which freed the Soviets to add 6,000 warheads to their ICBM array.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1985
The Reagan Administration should remember the old saw about not cutting off your nose to spite your face. Tearing up the SALT II arms-control agreement at this time would not be in America's own interests. The treaty was never ratified by the Senate. Shortly after Ronald Reagan became President, however, the United States and the Soviet Union agreed to adhere to the treaty provisions anyway. Last Friday Reagan repeated allegations that the Soviets have not lived up their side of the bargain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1987 | GLORIA DUFFY, Gloria Duffy is the president of Global Outlook, a research and consulting organization specializing in international security based in Palo Alto. and
This is the season for bad news about the Soviet Union. When an arms treaty goes before the Senate for ratification, opponents try to draw the public's attention to Soviet behavior that raises doubts about the Soviets' trustworthiness as treaty partners. As the treaty on intermediate-range nuclear forces nears completion, the number of leaks and disclosures of controversial Soviet behavior has already increased.
NEWS
June 19, 1986
Four senators introduced a resolution urging the United States to remain in compliance with SALT II, the unratified nuclear arms treaty that President Reagan says will no longer guide his Administration. The non-binding resolution was introduced in the Republican-controlled chamber a day before the Democratic-run House is scheduled to consider a similar resolution. The House measure was sent to the floor last week by the Foreign Affairs Committee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1987
Can someone tell me why the Administration has chosen to thumb its nose at current efforts toward arms control by violating the SALT II treaty in launching that more-than-is-allowed B-52 bomber equipped to carry nuclear weapons? Considering that: 1--Our nuclear stockpile already has an overkill capacity, being able to destroy the world a dozen times over. 2--All sane people know that to launch a heavy nuclear weapon, either as a first strike or in retaliation, will ultimately resuit in suicide for ourselves and the planet as a whole.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1987
Common sense, which has frequently been missing in the confrontational atmosphere between the White House and Congress, has finally prevailed in the long struggle over several key arms-control issues. The compromise deal, which was negotiated by senior Administration officials and members of a House-Senate conference committee on the defense budget, is only a temporary fix. The same issues may have to be fought out again next year.
NEWS
October 2, 1987 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
In a major victory for the arms control lobby, the Senate for the first time expressed support Thursday for a binding proposal that would force President Reagan to abide by key elements of the unratified 1979 strategic arms limitation treaty. By a 55-44 vote, the Democratic-controlled chamber refused to set aside the proposal, authored by Sen. Dale Bumpers (D-Ark.), that has been one of the perennial issues in the annual legislative battle over arms control.
NEWS
May 14, 1987
Defense Spending The House voted, 249 to 172, to lower defense spending next fiscal year from the $306-billion level set by the Armed Services Committee to $289 billion. The $17-billion cutbrought the 1988 defense outlay in line with the congressional budget resolution, which was approved after the committee had set the $306-billion level. Facing nearly 200 other amendments, the bill (HR 1748) remained in debate. Supporter Les Aspin (D-Wis.
NEWS
May 7, 1987 | PAUL HOUSTON and DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writers
The Democratic-controlled House, bolstering a similar stand that it took two weeks ago, moved Wednesday to force the Reagan Administration to abide by the 1979 strategic arms limitation treaty with the Soviet Union. Voting 245 to 181, largely along partisan lines, the House added an amendment to the 1988 defense authorization bill that would require the Administration to get back under the limits placed on warhead launchers by the unratified treaty, known as SALT II.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1987 | EDMUND S. MUSKIE, Former Sen. Edmund S. Muskie (D-Me.) served as the secretary of state in 1980-81
Henry A. Kissinger's important service to our nation needs no recitation; his auto-biographies provide a brilliant and effective apologia. Yet his very eminence in our national debate obliges others to take account of the erratic course that his views have taken over the years. The evolution of his thinking on nuclear strategy and arms control is perplexing; it gives one pause when assessing his negative counsel on President Reagan's unprecedented opportunity in arms control.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1987
In your editorial "Bigger Blunder" (Nov. 30), condemning President Reagan's breaching of the numerical limits of the expired SALT II agreement, you betray basic ignorance of the aims of arms control. The claim that the fielding of an extra B-52 bomber is somehow "more direct a violation"--and so presumably more important a violation--than the Soviet violations concerning verification, new missile types, ABM radars and ABM testing is misguided. The aim of arms control is to increase strategic stability, not necessarily to reduce the numbers of weapons.
NEWS
December 16, 1986 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
More than half the members of the incoming Senate, reflecting growing congressional discontent with the Reagan Administration's nuclear arms policy, warned President Reagan on Monday against continuing to violate the 1979 strategic arms treaty with the Soviet Union.
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