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November 16, 2001 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge in Utah on Thursday threw out all remaining charges in the criminal case against the two leaders of Salt Lake City's scandal-tainted bid for the 2002 Winter Olympics, declaring that the case was fatally flawed. "I am not surprised by this outcome," the current head of the Salt Lake Organizing Committee, Mitt Romney, said upon hearing that the case against Tom Welch, who headed the bid, and Dave Johnson, Welch's chief lieutenant, had been dismissed.
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SPORTS
November 16, 2001 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge in Utah on Thursday threw out all remaining charges in the criminal case against the two leaders of Salt Lake City's scandal-tainted bid for the 2002 Winter Olympics, declaring that the case was fatally flawed. "I am not surprised by this outcome," the current head of the Salt Lake Organizing Committee, Mitt Romney, said upon hearing that the case against Tom Welch, who headed the bid, and Dave Johnson, Welch's chief lieutenant, had been dismissed.
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SPORTS
December 17, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1991, Tom Welch, head of Salt Lake City's bid to win the Olympic Games, wrote a letter that looks now to be a key piece of evidence in his forthcoming trial on charges connected to the worst corruption scandal in Olympic history. "Few experiences in my life, past or present, mean as much to me as the privilege I had to show you Salt Lake City and our people," Welch wrote on May 1, 1991, to International Olympic Committee President Juan Antonio Samaranch.
SPORTS
March 23, 2001 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Goaltender Nikolai Khabibulin, who sat out nearly two NHL seasons because of a contract dispute, surprisingly was among the first eight players named to the Russian Olympic team Thursday for the Salt Lake City Winter Games. Equally surprising, Detroit Red Wing forward Sergei Fedorov was not on the list. One executive of the Russian Hockey Federation said Fedorov will play in the Olympics but wanted to let other players have the honor of being named first.
SPORTS
January 9, 1999 | MIKE PENNER
The snowfall here has been unusually light this winter, except for the massive rumbling snowball that claimed the jobs of Salt Lake City's top two Olympic officials Friday on its way to International Olympic Committee headquarters in Lausanne, Switzerland. The resignations of Frank Joklik, Salt Lake Organizing Committee's president, and Dave Johnson, senior vice president, represented only the first wave of the damage-control tsunami now cresting over the Salt Lake City bribery scandal.
SPORTS
June 16, 1995 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The view from the balcony was certainly the Danube River, but inside the hotel room here Thursday, International Olympic Committee members were sitting next to plastic pine trees laden with fake snow, listening to country music, munching salsa-dipped tortilla chips and gazing at a four-wall mural of Salt Lake City's Wasatch mountains.
SPORTS
March 3, 1999 | MIKE PENNER
George Mitchell is right: The culture of gift-giving and special favor that permeates the Olympic site-selection process is a mess in need of immediate custodial care. The bigger the broom the better. But what about what happens after the bid has been won and the Games are underway and the International Olympic Committee is in town, rolling up its sleeves for three weeks of wining, dining and free tickets to swimming, gymnastics and track and field?
SPORTS
June 21, 1999 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The International Olympic Committee warned its members Sunday they may face FBI questioning and perhaps even subpoenas in connection with the Salt Lake City corruption scandal. IOC Director General Francois Carrard also said that three IOC members were interviewed last month by the FBI, which is inquiring into the possibility of criminal wrongdoing stemming from Salt Lake's winning bid for the 2002 Games. A fourth IOC member is due to be interviewed in the coming weeks.
SPORTS
March 13, 1999 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The commission conducting an internal investigation of the Salt Lake City bribery scandal for the International Olympic Committee has recommended "the most serious of warnings" for two influential members, and one of them, former IOC vice president Kim Un Yong of South Korea, still faces the threat of expulsion.
SPORTS
March 19, 1999 | RANDY HARVEY
On the International Olympic Committee's scale of justice, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) has issued the organization "the most serious of warnings." That is because the IOC did this week what many organizations, including the U.S. Senate, do when confronted with a crisis. It established a couple of committees and declared victory. McCain, chairman of the Senate Commerce Committee that is scrutinizing the IOC's tax-exempt status in the United States, was not impressed.
SPORTS
February 23, 2001 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
America's best hope for a gold medal in Alpine skiing at the 2002 Salt Lake City Games took his second-ever training run down the Olympic downhill course Thursday. Daron Rahlves wonders how many more runs he'll get before he slides into the start gate for keeps next February. Rahlves, the 27-year-old from Truckee, Calif., who scored a stunning victory in super-giant slalom at the recent world championships in St.
SPORTS
February 8, 2001 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In figure skating terms, the Delta Center would have gotten a 4.9 for required elements and a 5.8 for presentation on the first day of the Four Continents figure skating championships, a test event for next year's Salt Lake City Winter Games. Because of its odd configuration, the arena for Olympic figure skating events merited less than a perfect 6.0 on Wednesday.
SPORTS
February 8, 2001 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year from today, the Winter Games open in Salt Lake City. Organizers are planning a daylong party today in and around the city with a host of government, Olympic and sports dignitaries. The focus will be on what Mitt Romney, president of the organizing committee, now ventures to say may be "great Games," citing a sunny financial picture, hot ticket sales, world-class venues in and around the Wasatch Mountains and thousands of volunteers signed and ready to go.
SPORTS
December 17, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1991, Tom Welch, head of Salt Lake City's bid to win the Olympic Games, wrote a letter that looks now to be a key piece of evidence in his forthcoming trial on charges connected to the worst corruption scandal in Olympic history. "Few experiences in my life, past or present, mean as much to me as the privilege I had to show you Salt Lake City and our people," Welch wrote on May 1, 1991, to International Olympic Committee President Juan Antonio Samaranch.
NEWS
September 20, 2000 | BILL DWYRE, TIMES SPORTS EDITOR
Next Tuesday will be 500 days to the Salt Lake City Winter Games, but the man entrusted with the success of that venture admitted here today that some of his city's emotional wounds remain over hosting this event. "I don't think we'll be all the way back until the day we light the torch," said Mitt Romney, president and CEO of the Salt Lake Organizing Committee.
SPORTS
May 26, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Department of Justice, as expected, has notified the Salt Lake Organizing Committee for the 2002 Winter Games that it will not be prosecuted for its corporate role in the worst corruption scandal in Olympic history, officials said Thursday. In a letter dated May 12 that was received Wednesday by the committee's Washington attorneys, the department said it has "no present intention" of seeking an indictment of the nonprofit corporation.
SPORTS
March 4, 1999 | MIKE PENNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wednesday's Olympic dog-and-pony show was hosted by the U.S. Olympic Committee and held in Washington, all the easier for the buck to be passed up Capitol Hill and placed on President Clinton's desk. While conceding that USOC oversight over the Salt Lake City bid campaign was "abysmal," USOC President Bill Hybl announced he had sent a letter to Clinton asking the White House to ride to the rescue, round up the guys in the black hats (i.e.
SPORTS
March 12, 1999 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anita DeFrantz, an International Olympic Committee vice president, denied Thursday that she was aware of the apparent buying and selling of votes during Salt Lake City's successful campaign to become the host city for the 2002 Winter Games. Asked if she had ever discussed corruption involving bid committee officials or IOC members with officials from the Salt Lake City bid, DeFrantz said, "God, no."
SPORTS
May 16, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
R. Kevan Gosper, Australia's senior member of the International Olympic Committee, was cleared Monday by the IOC's quasi-independent ethics commission of wrongdoing in connection with Salt Lake City's scandal-marred winning bid for the 2002 Winter Games. In its first major action since its creation last year at the height of the scandal, the ethics panel said Gosper had done nothing wrong when his family traveled to Utah for a skiing holiday in 1993.
SPORTS
April 20, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sign that the U.S. Justice Department is still gathering facts relating to Salt Lake City's scandal-marred bid for the 2002 Winter Olympics, federal agents interviewed International Olympic Committee Vice President Anita DeFrantz last week at her Los Angeles office. The interview April 10 lasted three hours and covered a "range of issues," DeFrantz said Wednesday. She declined to be more specific.
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