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November 16, 2001 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge in Utah on Thursday threw out all remaining charges in the criminal case against the two leaders of Salt Lake City's scandal-tainted bid for the 2002 Winter Olympics, declaring that the case was fatally flawed. "I am not surprised by this outcome," the current head of the Salt Lake Organizing Committee, Mitt Romney, said upon hearing that the case against Tom Welch, who headed the bid, and Dave Johnson, Welch's chief lieutenant, had been dismissed.
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November 16, 2001 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge in Utah on Thursday threw out all remaining charges in the criminal case against the two leaders of Salt Lake City's scandal-tainted bid for the 2002 Winter Olympics, declaring that the case was fatally flawed. "I am not surprised by this outcome," the current head of the Salt Lake Organizing Committee, Mitt Romney, said upon hearing that the case against Tom Welch, who headed the bid, and Dave Johnson, Welch's chief lieutenant, had been dismissed.
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SPORTS
May 27, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Salt Lake Organizing Committee on Friday released a lengthy and yet cryptic memo written in the early 1990s, a document that apparently targets members of the International Olympic Committee believed to be susceptible to bribery or other temptations.
SPORTS
July 17, 2001 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While the International Olympic Committee chose a new president in Moscow, prosecutors in Salt Lake City suffered a crucial setback Monday in their case against two men accused of lavishing IOC members with cash and gifts to secure the 2002 Winter Games. U.S. District Judge David Sam threw out four counts of racketeering that some legal observers consider the heart of the Justice Department's 15-count indictment against former Salt Lake bid executives Tom Welch and Dave Johnson.
SPORTS
February 5, 1999 | ROBERTO SURO, WASHINGTON POST
First-class airline tickets that could be traded for cash were used as a form of currency by Salt Lake City Olympics organizers as they tried to win favor with members of the International Olympic Committee, according to officials familiar with investigations into the Olympic bribery scandal.
SPORTS
March 15, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alfredo LaMont, a former U.S. Olympic Committee official, pleaded guilty Tuesday to two felony counts. The case reveals for the first time the Justice Department's game plan for prosecuting crimes stemming from the Salt Lake City corruption scandal. As part of a plea bargain, LaMont, 50, pleaded guilty in federal court in Salt Lake to one count of tax fraud and another of conspiring to obstruct the IRS. LaMont had resigned in January 1999 as the USOC's director of international relations.
SPORTS
March 17, 1999 | RANDY HARVEY
The International Olympic Committee returns to the Palais de Beaulieau today for an extraordinary session to address a scandal that threatens not only its role as the guardian of the five rings but the future of the Olympic Games. For anyone who was here for the IOC's annual session 13 years ago, it should come as no shock that this day of reckoning has arrived.
SPORTS
March 17, 1999 | RANDY HARVEY
Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) has urged the International Olympic Committee to move quickly in adopting reforms or "the demand for Congress to act will be irrepressible." McCain, chairman of the Senate Commerce Committee that has scheduled hearings for next month into the IOC, expressed his concerns in a letter to the senior IOC member from the United States, Anita DeFrantz of Los Angeles.
SPORTS
March 14, 1999 | RANDY HARVEY
In his best-selling book last year, "The Death of Outrage," former drug czar William J. Bennett vented about the lack of public outcry over the behavior in the oval office of one William J. Clinton. Well, I've got good news for outrage fans such as Bennett. The International Olympic Committee is doing its best to revive it.
SPORTS
March 16, 1999 | RANDY HARVEY
An International Olympic Committee member who remains in relatively good standing was chatting casually with reporters Monday in the lobby of the luxurious Palace Hotel when they told him they were awaiting an appearance by Jean-Claude Ganga. Ganga, of the Republic of Congo, is one of the Salt Lake City Six, members who have been recommended for expulsion for accepting payoffs of one kind or another during the city's successful bid for the 2002 Winter Games.
SPORTS
February 9, 2001 | HELENE ELLIOTT, From Staff and Wire Reports
Attorneys representing Olympic bid leaders accused of securing the Games through bribery argued Thursday that the charges should be tossed out of federal court because there's no victim, hence no crime. Bid leaders Tom Welch and Dave Johnson are accused of giving International Olympic Committee members and their families more than $1 million in cash, gifts and scholarships to steer votes to Salt Lake City. "The IOC, how have they been victimized?" lawyer Max Wheeler said.
SPORTS
May 27, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Salt Lake Organizing Committee on Friday released a lengthy and yet cryptic memo written in the early 1990s, a document that apparently targets members of the International Olympic Committee believed to be susceptible to bribery or other temptations.
SPORTS
March 15, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alfredo LaMont, a former U.S. Olympic Committee official, pleaded guilty Tuesday to two felony counts. The case reveals for the first time the Justice Department's game plan for prosecuting crimes stemming from the Salt Lake City corruption scandal. As part of a plea bargain, LaMont, 50, pleaded guilty in federal court in Salt Lake to one count of tax fraud and another of conspiring to obstruct the IRS. LaMont had resigned in January 1999 as the USOC's director of international relations.
SPORTS
February 1, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Juan Antonio Samaranch, the Spanish president of the International Olympic Committee, met Monday in New York City for six hours with Department of Justice prosecutors and FBI agents. Samaranch, 79, was interviewed as a witness, not a target of the Justice Department's investigation into Salt Lake City's scandal-tainted winning bid for the 2002 Winter Games. Among the topics were the roles of key Salt Lake City organizers and some IOC delegates.
SPORTS
November 18, 1999 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON
International Olympic Committee Vice President Anita DeFrantz of Los Angeles on Wednesday again denied any knowledge of the apparent buying and selling of votes during Salt Lake City's winning campaign for the 2002 Winter Olympics. DeFrantz, who has repeatedly stressed her innocence, made her comments in response to a U.S. Olympic Committee report that details her 1998 contact with the IOC member from Mali, Lamine Keita.
SPORTS
August 4, 1999 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Salt Lake City businessman pleaded guilty Tuesday to a misdemeanor tax charge in the first criminal case stemming from the U.S. Justice Department's investigation of the scandal surrounding Salt Lake City's winning bid for the 2002 Winter Olympics. David E.
SPORTS
January 25, 1999 | MIKE PENNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Generalissimo did not fall on his sword, nor did he remove one of his $1,000 gift Browning firearms from its handsome display case and demand mass resignations at gunpoint. The 2002 Winter Olympics will not be moving to Calgary, Innsbruck, Ostersund, Helsinki, Duluth, Point Barrow or an ice floe off the north coast of Greenland. International Olympic Committee headquarters did not rattle off its foundation, crumble into chunks of imported marble and sink slowly to the bottom of Lake Geneva.
SPORTS
February 9, 2001 | HELENE ELLIOTT, From Staff and Wire Reports
Attorneys representing Olympic bid leaders accused of securing the Games through bribery argued Thursday that the charges should be tossed out of federal court because there's no victim, hence no crime. Bid leaders Tom Welch and Dave Johnson are accused of giving International Olympic Committee members and their families more than $1 million in cash, gifts and scholarships to steer votes to Salt Lake City. "The IOC, how have they been victimized?" lawyer Max Wheeler said.
SPORTS
June 19, 1999 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The International Olympic Committee, still wrestling with the fallout from the Salt Lake City corruption scandal, on Saturday awarded the 2006 Winter Games to Turin, Italy. Sion, Switzerland, had been considered the favorite, but Turin prevailed, 53-36, setting off a mad celebration in a posh hotel lobby by 80 cell-phone-toting, Dom Perignon-drinking Italians. The decision sends the Winter Games back to Ialy for the first time since 1956.
NEWS
June 13, 1999 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this spring of his discontent, Agustin Arroyo of Ecuador finds his thoughts turning to the favors that cost him the beloved seat he held for 30 years on the International Olympic Committee. And to Tom Welch, who led Salt Lake City's winning bid for the 2002 Winter Games. "With Tom," Arroyo said, "it was always an embrace." And, not infrequently, there was something more: a retriever puppy for Arroyo, the dog fancier. Plane fare to a crucial IOC meeting in Europe for his wife.
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