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Salt Lake City Ut Ordinances

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NEWS
December 20, 1991 | Associated Press
Mayor Palmer DePaulis has vetoed a proposed ordinance that would send tenants to jail for not paying their rent, but the City Council chairman says council members may override the veto. The measure, an amendment to the Theft of Services Act, was aimed at swindlers who have no intention of paying rent, backers say. But opponents liken the plan to debtor's prison, saying it would penalize the poor. The violation would be a misdemeanor carrying a fine of up to $1,000 and a six-month jail term.
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NEWS
December 24, 1991 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
So many things have loosened up since the days of Charles Dickens and debtors' prisons. Too many, perhaps, to the thinking of the Salt Lake City Council. On a crackling cold Monday night, in a City Hall alight with a 20-foot Christmas tree, a defiant council voted, 5 to 1, for an ordinance that could send tenants to jail for not paying their rent. "Merry Christmas to the poor of Salt Lake City," shrugged an unhappy Mayor Palmer DePaulis, who vetoed the ordinance earlier this month.
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NEWS
December 24, 1991 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
So many things have loosened up since the days of Charles Dickens and debtors' prisons. Too many, perhaps, to the thinking of the Salt Lake City Council. On a crackling cold Monday night, in a City Hall alight with a 20-foot Christmas tree, a defiant council voted, 5 to 1, for an ordinance that could send tenants to jail for not paying their rent. "Merry Christmas to the poor of Salt Lake City," shrugged an unhappy Mayor Palmer DePaulis, who vetoed the ordinance earlier this month.
NEWS
December 20, 1991 | Associated Press
Mayor Palmer DePaulis has vetoed a proposed ordinance that would send tenants to jail for not paying their rent, but the City Council chairman says council members may override the veto. The measure, an amendment to the Theft of Services Act, was aimed at swindlers who have no intention of paying rent, backers say. But opponents liken the plan to debtor's prison, saying it would penalize the poor. The violation would be a misdemeanor carrying a fine of up to $1,000 and a six-month jail term.
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