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December 30, 2007 | Sarah Weinman, Sarah Weinman writes the Dark Passages column appearing monthly at latimes.com/books. She blogs about crime and mystery fiction at www.sarah weinman.com.
Whenever a critic reviewing a crime novel assigns literary significance to the book, there's a risk of falling into cliches about "transcending genre." The truth is that some writers use and abuse genre constraints as they see fit. They simply write to their voice and interests. James Sallis is such a writer. His six-volume cycle that featured African American detective Lew Griffin in a pre-Katrina New Orleans now seems haunting and eerie.
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TRAVEL
February 27, 2011 | By Charlie Vascellaro, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The paint has barely dried on the Dodgers' new spring training digs in Glendale, Ariz., and another new venue is making its debut in Arizona's Cactus League. Salt River Fields at Talking Stick, the third new ballpark in Arizona's spring circuit in the last three years, is the new spring home of the Arizona Diamondbacks and Colorado Rockies. The first Major League facility to be built on Native American land, it's on the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community bordering Scottsdale.
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NEWS
May 16, 2004 | Michelle Rushlo, Associated Press Writer
The dust, rocky soil and inhospitable summers make it hard to imagine why anyone would have settled here before the availability of air conditioners and sprinkler systems. But a century ago, Phoenix was a riverside community, a settlement with sometimes flowing water and an occasional flood. The water in the Salt River ebbed and flowed with the desert seasons. Eventually, dams turned the riverbed into a barren ribbon punctuated by gravel mines, abandoned cars and assorted junk.
BOOKS
December 30, 2007 | Sarah Weinman, Sarah Weinman writes the Dark Passages column appearing monthly at latimes.com/books. She blogs about crime and mystery fiction at www.sarah weinman.com.
Whenever a critic reviewing a crime novel assigns literary significance to the book, there's a risk of falling into cliches about "transcending genre." The truth is that some writers use and abuse genre constraints as they see fit. They simply write to their voice and interests. James Sallis is such a writer. His six-volume cycle that featured African American detective Lew Griffin in a pre-Katrina New Orleans now seems haunting and eerie.
NEWS
December 12, 1994 | PAUL DEAN
The elemental simplicities of wilderness travel were thrills. They represented complete freedom to make mistakes. The wilderness gave those rewards and penalties, for wise and foolish acts against which civilization has built a thousand buffers. --Aldo Leopold, author and forester * Taz Stoner fired the blast heard around the world of wilderness travel and whitewater rafting. He blew the lower lip off remote Quartzite Falls on the majestic Salt River 100 miles northeast of here.
NEWS
December 29, 1994
Thanks for "The River Mild" (Dec. 17) on the bombing of Quartzite Falls. I am a rafting outfitter on the Salt River and thus one of the purported "beneficiaries" of Taz Stoner and friends' rearrangement of Quartzite Falls. I was horrified by this act of destruction and remain troubled by its underlying arrogance. I want your readers to understand that all the river runners of my acquaintance absolutely repudiate this action and the Rambo mentality underlying it. Wilderness such as we find on the Salt River is a place we seek in order to experience the power of nature on its own terms.
NEWS
March 6, 1997 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A river is not gauged easily, not when slate-gray clouds slant down rain for days, holler creeks spill over and stream banks dissolve like wet powder. Pity the unfortunate town that straddles two immeasurable rivers. Pity West Point. Among all the river towns in Kentucky and Indiana that retreated Wednesday from the rising tide of the rain-swollen Ohio, West Point found there was no place to flee: At its back lapped the sullen brown waters of the overflowing Salt River.
NATIONAL
September 6, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The amount of salt dissolved in streams in the Northeast is rising, and chemicals used to clear snow and ice from the roads are being blamed. "We're basically hardening the watersheds and feeding them a high-salt diet. There is a direct connection between the number of driveways and parking lots we have and the quality of our water," said Sujay Kaushal of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science in Frostburg.
TRAVEL
February 27, 2011 | By Charlie Vascellaro, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The paint has barely dried on the Dodgers' new spring training digs in Glendale, Ariz., and another new venue is making its debut in Arizona's Cactus League. Salt River Fields at Talking Stick, the third new ballpark in Arizona's spring circuit in the last three years, is the new spring home of the Arizona Diamondbacks and Colorado Rockies. The first Major League facility to be built on Native American land, it's on the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community bordering Scottsdale.
NEWS
December 18, 1994
How beautiful Quartzite Falls must have been in season with the Salt River roiling over it at 50,000 cubic feet per second ("The River Mild," Dec. 12). Thanks to "Taz" (Stoner) and his buddies, I will never be able to see it. What about Niagara Falls? Is he going to blow that up, too? I am sure that is also unsafe for the arrogant or ignorant. KATHLEEN A. CLARK Culver City
NATIONAL
September 6, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The amount of salt dissolved in streams in the Northeast is rising, and chemicals used to clear snow and ice from the roads are being blamed. "We're basically hardening the watersheds and feeding them a high-salt diet. There is a direct connection between the number of driveways and parking lots we have and the quality of our water," said Sujay Kaushal of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science in Frostburg.
NEWS
May 16, 2004 | Michelle Rushlo, Associated Press Writer
The dust, rocky soil and inhospitable summers make it hard to imagine why anyone would have settled here before the availability of air conditioners and sprinkler systems. But a century ago, Phoenix was a riverside community, a settlement with sometimes flowing water and an occasional flood. The water in the Salt River ebbed and flowed with the desert seasons. Eventually, dams turned the riverbed into a barren ribbon punctuated by gravel mines, abandoned cars and assorted junk.
NEWS
March 6, 1997 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A river is not gauged easily, not when slate-gray clouds slant down rain for days, holler creeks spill over and stream banks dissolve like wet powder. Pity the unfortunate town that straddles two immeasurable rivers. Pity West Point. Among all the river towns in Kentucky and Indiana that retreated Wednesday from the rising tide of the rain-swollen Ohio, West Point found there was no place to flee: At its back lapped the sullen brown waters of the overflowing Salt River.
NEWS
December 29, 1994
Thanks for "The River Mild" (Dec. 17) on the bombing of Quartzite Falls. I am a rafting outfitter on the Salt River and thus one of the purported "beneficiaries" of Taz Stoner and friends' rearrangement of Quartzite Falls. I was horrified by this act of destruction and remain troubled by its underlying arrogance. I want your readers to understand that all the river runners of my acquaintance absolutely repudiate this action and the Rambo mentality underlying it. Wilderness such as we find on the Salt River is a place we seek in order to experience the power of nature on its own terms.
NEWS
December 12, 1994 | PAUL DEAN
The elemental simplicities of wilderness travel were thrills. They represented complete freedom to make mistakes. The wilderness gave those rewards and penalties, for wise and foolish acts against which civilization has built a thousand buffers. --Aldo Leopold, author and forester * Taz Stoner fired the blast heard around the world of wilderness travel and whitewater rafting. He blew the lower lip off remote Quartzite Falls on the majestic Salt River 100 miles northeast of here.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1997 | MATT KELLEY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Meldon Fulwilder says he tries to help young Pima Indians stay off the street-gang path by encouraging them to practice their traditional culture. It's an uphill battle. Just last month, his nephew and another young man were shot and killed by an ice cream truck driver on the nearby Gila River reservation in what police said was an attempted robbery. Last year, another nephew was stabbed to death on the Salt River reservation.
NATIONAL
August 11, 2003 | From Times Wire Services
Nearly all of the fish in a creek near a whiskey warehouse in Bardstown have died since fire destroyed the building and spilled its contents last week, and state officials have cited owner Jim Beam. Lightning set the warehouse on fire Aug. 4, and more than 800,000 gallons of burning bourbon flowed into the creek. State officials were investigating whether bourbon is also to blame for a larger fish kill in the Salt River.
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