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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1990 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A coal-fired power plant partly owned by the city of Los Angeles and located just 16 miles from Grand Canyon National Park has "contributed significantly" to the wintertime haze that is obscuring visibility at the nation's most popular scenic attraction, the National Academy of Sciences declared Thursday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2012 | By Dean Kuipers
When protesters were arrested at the management offices of a huge coal-fired power plant in Arizona in  December, it highlighted a very untidy fact about electricity in green-conscious L.A.: about half of it comes from coal. The protests were at the Tempe offices of the Salt River Project, managing partners of the massive Navajo Generating Station, which is a coal-fired power plant. As pointed out in this Alternet piece by Joshua Frank, the city of Los Angeles doesn't own coal-fired power plants, but L.A.'s Department of Water and Power still buys 44% of its  power from polluting plants across the state line in Arizona and Utah.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2012 | By Dean Kuipers
When protesters were arrested at the management offices of a huge coal-fired power plant in Arizona in  December, it highlighted a very untidy fact about electricity in green-conscious L.A.: about half of it comes from coal. The protests were at the Tempe offices of the Salt River Project, managing partners of the massive Navajo Generating Station, which is a coal-fired power plant. As pointed out in this Alternet piece by Joshua Frank, the city of Los Angeles doesn't own coal-fired power plants, but L.A.'s Department of Water and Power still buys 44% of its  power from polluting plants across the state line in Arizona and Utah.
NEWS
May 16, 2004 | Michelle Rushlo, Associated Press Writer
The dust, rocky soil and inhospitable summers make it hard to imagine why anyone would have settled here before the availability of air conditioners and sprinkler systems. But a century ago, Phoenix was a riverside community, a settlement with sometimes flowing water and an occasional flood. The water in the Salt River ebbed and flowed with the desert seasons. Eventually, dams turned the riverbed into a barren ribbon punctuated by gravel mines, abandoned cars and assorted junk.
NEWS
May 16, 2004 | Michelle Rushlo, Associated Press Writer
The dust, rocky soil and inhospitable summers make it hard to imagine why anyone would have settled here before the availability of air conditioners and sprinkler systems. But a century ago, Phoenix was a riverside community, a settlement with sometimes flowing water and an occasional flood. The water in the Salt River ebbed and flowed with the desert seasons. Eventually, dams turned the riverbed into a barren ribbon punctuated by gravel mines, abandoned cars and assorted junk.
NEWS
May 1, 1990 | BOB SECTER and RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
What value should be put on preserving a breathtaking vision? Four hundred million dollars? How much is it worth to guarantee that the vivid details and bright pastels of magnificent sheer chasm walls don't wash into cold, faded blurs of blue and gray? One billion dollars? How about $1.6 billion? Those are some of the estimates of what it could cost in just the first round of a new, more aggressive, yet fuzzily defined federal assault on dirty air.
BUSINESS
February 1, 1991 | Times Wire Services
The Environmental Protection Agency, trying to reduce haze and improve visibility over the Grand Canyon, said today that it will impose stringent pollution controls on a nearby coal-burning electric power plant. The EPA said the proposed action will cut sulfur emissions from the Navajo Generating Station in Arizona by 70%, although officials said they hope that the utility will install equipment that will reduce emissions even further.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A mother of two who disappeared last week was found in Phoenix on Tuesday where she was found illegally swimming in an irrigation canal. Melissa Jo Lindstrom-Harnit, 35, was reported missing July 24 after a hired caregiver arrived at her Riverside home to find her 8-year-old autistic son and 1-year-old daughter unattended, said Riverside police spokesman Steven Frasher. The daughter was bleeding from numerous cuts.
BUSINESS
September 7, 1997 | MAGGIE JACKSON, Maggie Jackson is a business writer for Associated Press
Workers at the Salt River Project, a Phoenix utility, had no trouble navigating the Internet after first connecting in 1994. In fact, they were a little too adept: A management check found that pornography sites were some of the most popular among employees. Today the utility uses special software that blocks pornography and other sites vetoed by management. As have many other companies, it has learned that the Net can be a double-edged sword.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2001 | From Associated Press
The Zuni Pueblo says the development of a strip mine in western New Mexico will harm a sacred lake, but an Arizona utility company says it will move ahead with plans to produce coal there by the end of 2005. Bob Barnard, mine project manager for the Arizona-based Salt River Project, said the utility must find a new source of coal for its Coronado Generating station in St. John's, Ariz., before supplies from the McKinley Mine near Gallup run out by 2005.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1990 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A coal-fired power plant partly owned by the city of Los Angeles and located just 16 miles from Grand Canyon National Park has "contributed significantly" to the wintertime haze that is obscuring visibility at the nation's most popular scenic attraction, the National Academy of Sciences declared Thursday.
NEWS
May 1, 1990 | BOB SECTER and RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
What value should be put on preserving a breathtaking vision? Four hundred million dollars? How much is it worth to guarantee that the vivid details and bright pastels of magnificent sheer chasm walls don't wash into cold, faded blurs of blue and gray? One billion dollars? How about $1.6 billion? Those are some of the estimates of what it could cost in just the first round of a new, more aggressive, yet fuzzily defined federal assault on dirty air.
OPINION
September 24, 1989
Your editorial on air cleanup in the Grand Canyon ("Grand Canyon Pollution Cleanup," Sept. 13) states the city "must be willing to share the cost of cleaning up pollution it causes elsewhere." While we agree with your statement, we also want to be assured that the funds spent on additional cleanup equipment for the Navajo Generating Station will indeed result in greater visibility at the Grand Canyon. As a 21% owner of the coal-fueled power plant, Los Angeles Department of Water and Power customers would be responsible for a fifth of the costs for additional emissions control equipment, including flue gas scrubbers, if required by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2001 | ALISA BLACKWOOD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The battle lines in a festering water dispute in central Arizona's burgeoning Yavapai County couldn't be clearer. A 7,700-foot mountain separates three thirsty communities looking for additional water and a cluster of smaller towns sitting above an expansive aquifer. It's a physical barrier as imposing as the positions that divide the two sides.
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