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Salt Treaty

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OPINION
June 22, 1986
President Reagan's decision to abandon SALT II is no sudden whim, but the culmination of a long-held determination to maintain the pressure, and eventually to attain strategic nuclear superiority over the Soviets. What do the rest of us do? Goodwin's excellent column suggests an answer: If we can restore the Democrats to control of the Senate in the elections next November, perhaps the moderates among them can hold back the Reagan nuclear stampede. HERBERT L. BREGSTEIN Beverly Hills
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NEWS
November 30, 1986 | Associated Press
The United States violated ceilings in the unratified SALT II nuclear arms treaty Friday when another Air Force B-52 bomber capable of carrying atomic-tipped cruise missiles became operational. The treaty's numerical limits were breached when the eight-engine B-52 arrived at Carswell Air Force Base in Texas after having been modified to carry as many as 12 low-flying cruise missiles.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1986
I am amused by your editorial (Nov. 10), "It's Outrageous," anent President Reagan's veto of the Clean Water Act. Not that I disagree with you, just that it is naive to believe that the string-pullers in this Administration will change their mind about anything. Take note of the ease with which they dissembled the American people about their interest in peace and arms reduction. They painted the picture of hope for results with Iceland, then as soon as the election was over, back to the talk about the "Evil Empire."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1986
I am amused by your editorial (Nov. 10), "It's Outrageous," anent President Reagan's veto of the Clean Water Act. Not that I disagree with you, just that it is naive to believe that the string-pullers in this Administration will change their mind about anything. Take note of the ease with which they dissembled the American people about their interest in peace and arms reduction. They painted the picture of hope for results with Iceland, then as soon as the election was over, back to the talk about the "Evil Empire."
NEWS
June 20, 1986 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
The Democratic-dominated House and the GOP-controlled Senate Armed Services Committee on Thursday approved non-binding resolutions calling on President Reagan to continue to abide by the 1979 strategic arms limitation treaty with the Soviet Union. In the House, the vote was 256 to 145, with 37 Republicans siding with the Democratic majority. In a closed session of the Senate Armed Services Committee, Sen. William S. Cohen (R-Me.) voted with the Democrats to narrowly approve the resolution, 10-9.
NEWS
July 22, 1986 | United Press International
Delegations led by military generals from the United States and the Soviet Union opened talks today on the future of the 1979 SALT II treaty limiting strategic nuclear arms. The meeting was requested by Moscow after President Reagan, citing alleged Soviet violations, announced in May that Washington no longer felt bound by the limits of the strategic arms limitation treaty, which was never ratified by Congress but has been observed by informal agreement.
NEWS
June 10, 1985 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration is about to scuttle the SALT II treaty, either in one stroke or "creepingly, step by step," the Communist Party newspaper Pravda said Sunday. The accusation appeared in a Pravda editorial on the eve of President Reagan's scheduled announcement on whether the United States will continue to observe the 1979 strategic arms limitation treaty, which was signed by both sides but never ratified by the Senate.
NEWS
July 22, 1986 | United Press International
Delegations led by military generals from the United States and the Soviet Union opened talks today on the future of the 1979 SALT II treaty limiting strategic nuclear arms. The meeting was requested by Moscow after President Reagan, citing alleged Soviet violations, announced in May that Washington no longer felt bound by the limits of the strategic arms limitation treaty, which was never ratified by Congress but has been observed by informal agreement.
OPINION
June 22, 1986
I was left with a feeling of frustration and helplessness when I read Goodwin's column. I quote from his warning sentence "Public men must be judged by their public acts. By that standard, the only possible standard, President Ronald Reagan is a very dangerous man." Has the President's much publicized popularity gone to his head? How dare he threaten our very existence. "The Great Communicator" is now communicating world destruction and chaos. His overriding conceit sees himself as a "man on horseback," a Commander-in-Chief of a nation at war. Is there no way that his "public" can understand the danger we are in?
NEWS
June 20, 1986 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
The Democratic-dominated House and the GOP-controlled Senate Armed Services Committee on Thursday approved non-binding resolutions calling on President Reagan to continue to abide by the 1979 strategic arms limitation treaty with the Soviet Union. In the House, the vote was 256 to 145, with 37 Republicans siding with the Democratic majority. In a closed session of the Senate Armed Services Committee, Sen. William S. Cohen (R-Me.) voted with the Democrats to narrowly approve the resolution, 10-9.
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