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Salt Water

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NEWS
September 17, 1998 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this agricultural valley, lettuce is king, one town holds a broccoli festival, another bills itself as the artichoke capital of the world, and people tend to be slow to speak and economical with their words when they do. Until you ask about water. Then they get downright loquacious. And testy. Real testy. Some say that if there is a seventh level of hell in California's water wars, it lies here in the Salinas Valley.
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NEWS
March 22, 2013 | By Noelle Carter
Ever made -- or heard of -- onigiri ? A couple of years ago, food writer Sonoko Sakai did a great piece on onigiri for Food. She wrote: "Onigiri is a quick and satisfying Japanese fast food made with rice. You might find some resemblance to those sushi rolls you have been snacking on lately, but fundamentally they are two different things. Sushi's focal point is the fish, which sits on top of rice seasoned with a sweet vinegar and salt mixture. The vinegared rice acts basically to preserve the raw fish.
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SCIENCE
March 6, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
Using the Keck II telescope and OSIRIS spectrometer on a mountain in Mauna Kea, Hawaii, scientists from Caltech and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory have discovered what lies beneath the frozen surface of Jupiter's moon Europa. And apparently, it's a compelling story. Europa's ocean looks a lot like ours, said Mike Brown, a scientist at Caltech who co-wrote a paper on the Jupiter satellite. Beneath a thick layer of ice (yes, the frozen-water kind) flows a massive ocean of salt water and other chemicals, which if stirred with geological activity and a sprinkle of energy, could harbor life, scientists believe.
SCIENCE
March 6, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
Using the Keck II telescope and OSIRIS spectrometer on a mountain in Mauna Kea, Hawaii, scientists from Caltech and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory have discovered what lies beneath the frozen surface of Jupiter's moon Europa. And apparently, it's a compelling story. Europa's ocean looks a lot like ours, said Mike Brown, a scientist at Caltech who co-wrote a paper on the Jupiter satellite. Beneath a thick layer of ice (yes, the frozen-water kind) flows a massive ocean of salt water and other chemicals, which if stirred with geological activity and a sprinkle of energy, could harbor life, scientists believe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1988
High-pressure barriers built in the 1960s to hold the ocean at bay have failed to halt the flow of seawater into South Bay water basins, new studies show. In addition, huge pools of salt water trapped inside the barriers have continued to move inland, closing dozens of drinking water wells from Manhattan Beach to central Torrance and threatening several others in Carson that were once thought safe.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2012 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Utah's Great Salt Lake covers some 1,700 square miles, making it one of the largest such bodies of salt water around. Have you ever wondered exactly where, relative to other parts of that vast and peculiar lake, artist Robert Smithson built his landmark environmental sculpture "The Spiral Jetty" in 1970? With just a few clicks of your mouse, Google Earth would be happy to show you, thanks to a newly launched project in conjunction with a sprawling exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art's Little Tokyo warehouse space.
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | By Noelle Carter
Ever made -- or heard of -- onigiri ? A couple of years ago, food writer Sonoko Sakai did a great piece on onigiri for Food. She wrote: "Onigiri is a quick and satisfying Japanese fast food made with rice. You might find some resemblance to those sushi rolls you have been snacking on lately, but fundamentally they are two different things. Sushi's focal point is the fish, which sits on top of rice seasoned with a sweet vinegar and salt mixture. The vinegared rice acts basically to preserve the raw fish.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1999 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a coastal lava desert at the western tip of the island of Hawaii, a hodgepodge of unusual plants is thriving. Artichokes, Brussels sprouts, even delicate roses bloom in the broiling sun, alongside the passion fruit and orchids that belong in Hawaiian backyards. The secret to getting temperate plants to flourish in these harsh conditions lies 2,000 feet below the sun-flecked surf just yards away.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1990 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Southern California Edison and a condominium developer were planning their $3-million project to turn seawater into drinking water on Catalina Island, the technology they chose came straight off the rack. Increasingly efficient and time-tested methods of removing salt from water have made desalination reliable in more and more situations. All that has kept the decades-old industry from flowering has been the relatively cheap supply of bulk water from more traditional sources.
BUSINESS
December 15, 1993 | DEBORA VRANA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Turning salty ocean water into drinkable, even tasty commercial beverages may transform two Newport Beach entrepreneurs into successful business owners. The founders of fledgling Seaborn Beverages Co. say their company will be the nation's first to make clear, carbonated and flavored water from seawater. The water is gathered near Santa Catalina Island, purified in Long Beach, then packaged in dark blue glass bottles under the "Seaborn" name.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2012 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Utah's Great Salt Lake covers some 1,700 square miles, making it one of the largest such bodies of salt water around. Have you ever wondered exactly where, relative to other parts of that vast and peculiar lake, artist Robert Smithson built his landmark environmental sculpture "The Spiral Jetty" in 1970? With just a few clicks of your mouse, Google Earth would be happy to show you, thanks to a newly launched project in conjunction with a sprawling exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art's Little Tokyo warehouse space.
FOOD
April 8, 2010 | By Janet Mendel, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Put a new wrinkle in the way you cook potatoes. In the Spanish Canary Islands they are called papas arrugadas , or wrinkly potatoes. Cooking in heavily salted water wrinkles the skins and leaves them with a light crusting of salt. The result is a concentrated potato flavor enlivened by a gentle seasoning that seems to go all the way through. They are delicious served with baked or grilled fish and Canary Island mojo sauces. The Canary Islands are sort of Spain's Hawaii.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2009 | Tony Perry
A plan by a private company to build a $320-million desalination plant along the coast of northern San Diego County was unanimously approved Wednesday by the San Diego Regional Water Quality Control Board. Proponents say the plan could provide more than 56,000 acre-feet of drinkable water by 2012, enough to satisfy the needs of more than 100,000 families.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Two lost whales were on the move again Sunday toward the Pacific after lingering for a week near a Sacramento River bridge about 70 miles from the ocean, officials coordinating the rescue said. The mother humpback and her calf passed under the Rio Vista Bridge just before 2 p.m. and were spotted about 14 miles downriver near Pittsburg, Calif., about 6:30 p.m., said Greg Hurner, senior advisor with the state Department of Fish and Game.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2006 | George Skelton
Right up front, I'll admit to having a conflict of interest: I live under the shadow of a leaky levee along the Sacramento River. So when the governor declares a state of emergency before a flood to expedite fixing the worst leaks, I really don't care about any political motives. Just fill the holes. Shore up the crumbling banks.
HEALTH
January 23, 2006 | From Times wire reports
Mists of inhaled saltwater can reduce the pus and infection that fills the airways of cystic fibrosis sufferers, although side effects include a nasty coughing fit and a harsh taste. That's the conclusion of two studies published in the Jan. 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. They found that inhaling a mist with a salt content of 7% or 9% improved lung function and, in some cases, produced less absenteeism from school or work.
HEALTH
January 23, 2006 | From Times wire reports
Mists of inhaled saltwater can reduce the pus and infection that fills the airways of cystic fibrosis sufferers, although side effects include a nasty coughing fit and a harsh taste. That's the conclusion of two studies published in the Jan. 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. They found that inhaling a mist with a salt content of 7% or 9% improved lung function and, in some cases, produced less absenteeism from school or work.
BOOKS
August 21, 2005 | Nathaniel Rich, Nathaniel Rich, an editor at the Paris Review, is the author of "San Francisco Noir."
EVERY August, tens of thousands of northern Italians head south to the paradisiacal Mediterranean beaches of southern Italy, to the Amalfi Coast, to Capri, Sicily and Sardinia, where they enjoy several weeks of idleness and a way of life that soldiers on at an even slower pace than the rest of Italy. Forget afternoon siestas -- to many tourists these southern regions seem adrift in a perpetual nap that has lasted for more than 25 centuries.
HEALTH
December 6, 2004 | From Reuters
Simply inhaling a saltwater spray could help prevent the spread of diseases including flu and tuberculosis. U.S. and German researchers have found that a saline spray, administered using a device called a jet nebulizer, reduced the number of germ-spreading droplets released in coughs by as much as 70% for six hours.
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