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Salton Sea Authority

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2004 | Deborah Schoch, Times Staff Writer
A $730-million plan to restore California's largest lake by cutting it in two won the approval of the Salton Sea Authority on Thursday, but it still must win the support of the Schwarzenegger administration. The decision highlights what appear to be two separate efforts to restore the Salton Sea, one generated by local officials in the Imperial Valley region and the other in Sacramento, where state officials are launching their own study on how to save the sea from choking in salt.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2012 | By Hector Becerra, Los Angeles Times
Regional air quality managers said Tuesday that inspectors had cracked the mystery of the epic stink that had descended over much of Southern California. They confirmed that the rotten egg odor traveled about 150 miles from the Salton Sea to Los Angeles. "We now have solid evidence that clearly points to the Salton Sea as the source of a very large and unusual odor event," said Barry Wallerstein, executive officer of the South Coast Air Quality Management District. How unusual?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2004 | Deborah Schoch, Times Staff Writer
Farmers, environmentalists and water experts have tussled for decades over what to do with the Salton Sea, the malodorous saltwater lake fed by agricultural runoff that is also an oasis for millions of birds and fish. The latest challenge is how to preserve the wildlife habitat while reducing the amount of water that supports it, which is required by a recent pact involving nearby Imperial Valley farmers, the city of San Diego and the federal government.
NEWS
September 11, 2012 | By Paul Whitefield
Well, it's official now: Southern California stinks. This, of course, qualifies as old news to Americans of the Republican persuasion, and to residents of Northern California, San Franciscans in particular. (Who says bipartisanship is dead in America?!) But it comes as somewhat of a rude awakening to those of us who live in what we modestly like to call “heaven on Earth.” The trouble started Monday when residents from Ventura County to Palm Springs reported a foul stench.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1998
The perspective offered by Ivan P. Colburn in "Salton Sea Is Dead--Keep It That Way" (Commentary, June 18) minimizes the importance of the Salton Sea to migratory birds. He suggests that the birds could revert to the stopover sites they used before the sea was formed. It is the loss and degradation of wetland habitats--over 90% have been paved over, developed or otherwise degraded--throughout Southern California that have made the Salton Sea so important. The Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge has recorded nearly 400 species of birds, one of the highest totals in the entire national refuge system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2005 | Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer
The Salton Sea Authority is advancing a plan to build up to 200,000 homes around the state's largest lake on land that includes a former atomic weapons testing site. The plan could also move the boundaries of a national wildlife refuge, a key stopover for more than 100,000 migrating birds.
OPINION
November 1, 2005
'WATERFRONT PROPERTY." They may be the two loveliest words in real estate, with "mountain views" not too far behind. By the way, would you be interested in a lot, under $50,000 if you buy now, a block or so from a lake twice the size of Tahoe, with rocky peaks visible in the distance? Real estate dreams never die, even when they're attached to a place with the history of the Salton Sea, an accidental lake stranded in the dusty Southern California desert of Imperial County.
NEWS
March 2, 2000 | From Associated Press
A tractor-like machine that sprays salty water into the air to speed up evaporation was taken for a test drive Wednesday at the Salton Sea, where the search is on for ways to reduce the salinity in California's largest lake. The test of the Turbo Mist machine marked the first time in 40 years that any method of salinity control has been tested there. The sea is 25% saltier than the Pacific Ocean. "It's time for action," said Tom Kirk, director of the Salton Sea Authority.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Hundreds of thousands of rotting fish have been found along the shoreline of California's largest lake in a rare winter die-off because of last month's cold snap. It's unclear how many of the estimated 200 million fish in the Salton Sea died, but many were floating Friday. Officials said they started noticing the dead fish about two weeks ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2001 | From Associated Press
A 50-year-old chemical treatment may remedy the problem of increased algal blooms in the Salton Sea. A study released Friday suggested that adding aluminum sulfate to two of the lake's tributaries could help neutralize phosphates flowing into the sea and cut down on algae growth. The problem facing California's largest lake in the desert northeast of San Diego is called eutrophication, by which nutrients in the water create an environment conducive to algae growth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2012 | By Hector Becerra, Phil Willon and Andrew Blankstein, Los Angeles Times
When the rotten egg smell wafted into the Santa Clarita United Methodist Church in Saugus on Monday morning, Kathy Gray thought the church's sewer pipe had burst. More than 70 miles to the east, steelworker Chris Tatum's nostrils got the punch in Riverside. He assumed a brush fire had just broken out. "It reeks," he said. "It smells like rotten mush. " Southern California awoke Monday morning to a foul odor that wouldn't go away. Residents clogged 911 lines with calls, prompting health officials from Ventura County to Palm Springs to send investigators looking for everything from a toxic spill to a sewer plant leak.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2007 | David Kelly, Times Staff Writer
An ambitious $8.9-billion, 75-year plan to save the Salton Sea was handed to state lawmakers Friday. It calls for a drastically shrunken lake, the creation of a new "marine sea" and creation of thousands of separate wildlife habitats. "What we have done here is truly historic," said Michael Chrisman, California's resources secretary. "There is a little bit in here for everyone. There will be a lot of debate, and we think that is very healthy."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Hundreds of thousands of rotting fish have been found along the shoreline of California's largest lake in a rare winter die-off because of last month's cold snap. It's unclear how many of the estimated 200 million fish in the Salton Sea died, but many were floating Friday. Officials said they started noticing the dead fish about two weeks ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2006 | Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer
State officials have released 10 proposals that could prevent the polluted Salton Sea, an internationally recognized stopping point for migratory birds, from turning into a brackish expanse of mud ringed by a choking dust bowl. The lake, California's largest at 360 square miles, will lose nearly half of its imported water flows beginning in 2017 because of a state and federal agreement to transfer the water to fast-growing urban areas.
OPINION
November 1, 2005
'WATERFRONT PROPERTY." They may be the two loveliest words in real estate, with "mountain views" not too far behind. By the way, would you be interested in a lot, under $50,000 if you buy now, a block or so from a lake twice the size of Tahoe, with rocky peaks visible in the distance? Real estate dreams never die, even when they're attached to a place with the history of the Salton Sea, an accidental lake stranded in the dusty Southern California desert of Imperial County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2005 | Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer
The Salton Sea Authority is advancing a plan to build up to 200,000 homes around the state's largest lake on land that includes a former atomic weapons testing site. The plan could also move the boundaries of a national wildlife refuge, a key stopover for more than 100,000 migrating birds.
OPINION
August 15, 2002
Your Aug. 8 editorial, "Don't Let Salton Stop Deal," accurately portrays the situation California faces on Colorado River water, but it should be noted that we have known the deadlines we face for years and have been unable to come to agreement on the details of how to resolve the situation. One of the important details is how the impacts of the proposed water transfer on the Salton Sea will be addressed. Your suggestion that the Salton Sea shouldn't stop the transfer is shortsighted.
NEWS
August 2, 2000 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Agencies studying how to save the Salton Sea said Tuesday that they are dropping a politically touchy proposal to use water from the Colorado River to cut the sea's high salt content. Federal and local officials also announced a new round of studies to assess a method that would combine shallow ponds and the sun's power to take salt from the environmentally troubled lake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2004 | Deborah Schoch, Times Staff Writer
A $730-million plan to restore California's largest lake by cutting it in two won the approval of the Salton Sea Authority on Thursday, but it still must win the support of the Schwarzenegger administration. The decision highlights what appear to be two separate efforts to restore the Salton Sea, one generated by local officials in the Imperial Valley region and the other in Sacramento, where state officials are launching their own study on how to save the sea from choking in salt.
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