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Salvador Cano

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NEWS
June 3, 1989 | EDWIN CHEN, Times Staff Writer
Seven people--including a police officer on disability leave and his father-in-law, a disbarred attorney--have been charged with running four medical clinics in Los Angeles that were staffed mostly by bogus medical personnel. Authorities said Friday that the clinics treated about 1,000 patients a week, at up to $100 a visit. Staffers at the chain of clinics--two in the city's Westlake District and one each in Boyle Heights and Wilmington--routinely conducted blood and pregnancy tests, prescribed and dispensed drugs, administered injections, set broken bones, took X-rays and supervised physical therapy for accident victims, according to Los Angeles Deputy City Atty.
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NEWS
June 3, 1990 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of low-income immigrants are flocking to storefront medical clinics that have sprung up on street corners and in mini-malls throughout Southern California--walk-in, cash-only facilities where the service is quick but the quality of care, authorities say, can be dangerous. Most are legitimate operations that give the poor and working class access to medical attention they might not otherwise have.
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NEWS
June 3, 1990 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of low-income immigrants are flocking to storefront medical clinics that have sprung up on street corners and in mini-malls throughout Southern California--walk-in, cash-only facilities where the service is quick but the quality of care, authorities say, can be dangerous. Most are legitimate operations that give the poor and working class access to medical attention they might not otherwise have.
NEWS
June 3, 1989 | EDWIN CHEN, Times Staff Writer
Seven people--including a police officer on disability leave and his father-in-law, a disbarred attorney--have been charged with running four medical clinics in Los Angeles that were staffed mostly by bogus medical personnel. Authorities said Friday that the clinics treated about 1,000 patients a week, at up to $100 a visit. Staffers at the chain of clinics--two in the city's Westlake District and one each in Boyle Heights and Wilmington--routinely conducted blood and pregnancy tests, prescribed and dispensed drugs, administered injections, set broken bones, took X-rays and supervised physical therapy for accident victims, according to Los Angeles Deputy City Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1989 | JOHN JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
A day after seven people were accused of operating four clinics with bogus medical personnel, two of the clinics were open and attracting a steady stream of patients in the heavily immigrant Westlake district Saturday. Young Latino families, carrying small babies and trailing children in frilly white dresses, climbed the steps to the Santa Ines and Bonnie Brae medical clinics at 2033 W. 7th St. Several of those questioned said they had not heard of the arrests. That may change soon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1989 | MARITA HERNANDEZ, Times Staff Writer
Two more officials with a chain of allegedly phony medical clinics surrendered to Los Angeles police Monday as authorities moved to close the clinics, at least one of which continued to operate over the weekend. Bruce Alan Miller, 38, of Van Nuys, an accountant for the clinics, and Frank Hegyi, 47, a Westside resident and a licensed chiropractor who worked as a clinic administrator, were booked in connection with several Labor Code violations. By Monday afternoon, the two men and five others who had been arrested previously all were free on bail ranging from $250 to $100,000 each, said Deputy City Atty.
NEWS
June 28, 1990 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of low-income immigrants are flocking to storefront medical clinics that have sprung up on street corners and in mini-malls throughout Southern California--walk-in, cash-only facilities where the service is quick but the quality of care, authorities say, can be dangerous. Most are legitimate operations that give the poor and working class access to medical attention they might not otherwise have.
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