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Salvador Dali

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NEWS
November 29, 1988 | Associated Press
Spanish surrealist painter Salvador Dali was transferred to a Barcelona clinic Monday with suspected pneumonia and a worsening heart condition, hospital officials said. A Quiron Clinic spokeswoman said the 84-year-old Dali was being examined by doctors in the intensive care unit. Dali had been admitted to the hospital in his hometown of Figueras, 60 miles north of Barcelona, on Sunday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
Even by his hyphenate standards, Alan Cumming has been pretty busy lately. The Tony-winner and Emmy-nominee's role as slick campaign manager Eli Gold on "The Good Wife" continues to be meaty, with the series recently picked up for a fifth season. He's set to star in a one-man "Macbeth" that opens on Broadway later this month (more on that shortly). And now he has several film projects in the works. Cumming tells The Times that he's come aboard to star in "First-Class Man," the long-developed Roger Spottiswoode film about an Indian prodigy who makes the move from his native country to Cambridge, England.
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NEWS
January 24, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
Salvador Dali, the surrealist painter, self-promoter and genuine eccentric, died Monday at a hospital in Figueras, Spain. He was 84. Dali, an unforgettable figure with slicked-down hair, waxed mustache and gold-headed cane, had been in declining health for half a dozen years, suffering from what doctors first thought was Parkinson's disease and ultimately diagnosed as heart trouble, as well as the near-fatal aftereffects of a fire in his home.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2012 | By Stanley Meisler
WASHINGTON - For a hundred years, artists have been using and abusing newspapers as a vital part of their works. Pungent examples include the Spanish painter Salvador Dali creating an absurd newspaper about himself, the German-born Swiss artist Dieter Roth making a sausage, complete with gelatin and spices, out of copies of the British tabloid Daily Mirror and the American Jim Hodges coating a Jordanian newspaper entirely in 24 karat gold. Little attention has been paid to this phenomenon by the world's museums in the past.
NEWS
January 23, 1989 | Associated Press
Surrealist painter Salvador Dali, whose fantastic and memorable dreamscapes were as eccentric and flamboyant as his behavior, died today in his hometown, his doctor said. He was 84. Dali died at 10:15 a.m. at Figueras Hospital, said Dr. Charles Ponsati. "The cause of death was cardiac arrest brought on by his respiratory insufficiency and pneumonia," Ponsati said.
BOOKS
October 14, 2007 | Richard Schickel, Richard Schickel's new book, "Film on Paper," will be published early next year.
Dali & Film Edited by Matthew Gale Tate Publishing: 238 pp., $60 paper IN the winter of 1929, two young Spaniards, Luis Bunel and Salvador Dali, spent several weeks together hammering out the screenplay for the short film eventually titled "Un chien andalou," which Bunel then shot and which had a riotous premiere in Paris in June of that year. By the following fall, the two artists were at it again, collaborating on a longer (and I think better) movie, released as "L'Age d'Or" in 1930.
TRAVEL
January 4, 2004 | Jane Engle, Times Staff Writer
Now is the time to get real about Salvador Dali. Or, should we say, surreal. In Europe and the U.S., the 100th anniversary of the May 11, 1904, birth of the Spanish master of the Surrealist movement is being marked with special exhibits and performances throughout 2004. Taking a cue from his 1931 painting of melting watches, the celebrations testify to the persistence of memory about the flamboyant artist, who died in 1989 in his birthplace, Figueres, Spain. In the U.S.
BOOKS
December 14, 1986 | Robert Short, Short's last book was "Hans Bellmer" (Quartet, London, 1985) written in collaboration with Peter Webb. and
It is a sign of Salvador Dali's enduring fascination that the same month should see the appearance of a major new biography and a reprint of Dali's own characteristically grandiloquent jottings between 1952 and 1963 that he titled "Diary of a Genius." Dali is the world's best-selling living painter. To explain this popularity, the English novelist J. G. Ballard wrote some years ago: "The art of Salvador Dali is a metaphor that embraces the twentieth century.
NEWS
May 10, 1998 | ROBERT TANNER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The painting hangs on a wall between a soda machine and a trio of pay phones. Guards hurry past to the water fountain or the bathroom. Down the hall, behind locked doors, thieves and drug dealers clamor in their cells. This is no art gallery. It's a place for hard time. But there it is, a forgotten footnote in the art world. Capt.
TRAVEL
October 3, 1999 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
Head north from Barcelona, past the beaches and rolling foothills of Catalonia, and look for this drab little city about 15 miles south of the French border. Head up the main drag. Then turn right at the big red building, the one with the 6-foot-high eggs balanced on its roof and the loaves of faux bread plastered to its sides in a sort of lunatic wallpaper pattern. These are clues. Pause at the plaza where the tractor tires and television sets stand artfully stacked.
NEWS
September 4, 2012
It's no mystery why “Mystère” has been packing them in at Treasure Island for nearly two decades. Cirque du Soleil's original Las Vegas production is at once surreal, breathtaking, hair-raising and hilarious, with characters clad in crazy and colorful costumes that could have been designed by Salvador Dali on acid. The cast makes the seemingly superhuman look like child's play. Expect gravity-defying pole walking, a Herculean hand-and-body balancing act, breathtaking flips and spins by aerial silk performers, and incredible triple somersaults by trapeze artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2012 | by David Ng
Recovering stolen masterpieces can sometimes take years of police sleuthing. But in the case of a recently pilfered Salvador Dali painting, a resolution has come swiftly, if somewhat mysteriously. Dali's "Cartel de Don Juan Tenirio" was recently mailed back to the New York gallery from which it was stolen June 19. The parcel, which the gallery received on Friday, was mailed from Greece, according to the New York Post, which was the first to report the bizarre return. The culprit remains unknown, and the return address on the parcel is believed to be fake.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2012 | Ed Stockly
"Open Call" 9 p.m. Thursday, KCET: 100 Voices: A Journey Home: Hosted by mezzo-soprano opera singer Suzanna Guzman, "Open Call" features a wide variety of productions from profiles of artists. "Soulful Symphony With Darin Atwater: Song in a Strange Land" 11:30 a.m. Friday; Noon Wednesday, KCET: Artistic director Atwater conducts an 85-member orchestra in compositions exhibiting styles ranging through gospel, jazz and symphonic music. "Il Volo Takes Flight" Noon Friday, KOCE: The Italian teen vocal group performs classical and traditional Italian songs at the Detroit Opera House.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2010 | By Liesl Bradner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When Sigmund Freud's "The Interpretation of Dreams" was first published in 1899, he initially believed it a flop ? that it had failed to make any impact ? and it took nearly a decade before a second print run was required. The revolutionary book introduced key psychological techniques for interpreting dreams and laid the foundation for psychoanalysis. A new illustrated edition (Sterling, $45) breathes fresh life into an academic subject. Accompanying a translation by A.A. Brill of the original text are full-color, dream-centric illustrations by modern and surrealist artists such as Salvador Dali, René Magritte, Frida Kahlo and Paul Gauguin.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2010
PBS executives are in active discussions with cash-strapped KCET-TV Channel 28 to keep the Los Angeles station a vibrant part of public television, PBS President Paula Kerger said Wednesday during the semiannual TV press tour in Beverly Hills. In town to tout her new slate of national programming, Kerger took a reporter's question about KCET's precarious financial situation, which was reported in The Times Wednesday. Station executives, hit hard by a drop in contributions and intense competition from other channels, are weighing leaving the PBS network and going independent, among other options.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2009 | BETSY SHARKEY, FILM CRITIC
"Little Ashes" is a trifling historical fantasy, gossip wrapped in gossamer, beautiful to watch but it takes only a light wind to leave the story in tatters. The setting is an imaginary Madrid, circa 1922. The Catholic Church and the intellectuals are locked in a battle for the Spanish soul. At the university, ideas and emotions are roiling the lives of three friends, the esoteric is debated in bedrooms and bars over massive quantities of alcohol.
NEWS
July 15, 1986 | From Reuters
Spanish surrealist painter Salvador Dali has been given a pacemaker after a heart operation, doctors in Barcelona said Monday. They said the 82-year-old artist was recovering well.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1990 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Agreement on Dali's Estate: Some 200 paintings by surrealist artist Salvador Dali, who died last January at 84, will be divided between museums in Madrid and Dali's native Catalonia, according to an agreement announced Tuesday. Fifty-six paintings will find a home in Madrid's Reina Sofia art center, while 134 paintings will be permanently exhibited in Catalonia.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2009 | Associated Press
Spanish police said Thursday that they had confiscated dozens of suspected fake Dali artworks that were to be put on sale in the southern town of Estepona. A total of 81 pieces were seized, 12 of which might be genuine pieces designed by Salvador Dali and are very similar to pieces listed on Interpol and Spanish police records as having been stolen in Belgium, France and the United States, a police statement said. The art included sculptures, bas-reliefs, lithographs, cutlery and textile pieces.
NEWS
November 9, 2008 | Alexandra Olson and Patrick McGroarty, Olson and McGroarty write for the Associated Press.
Leonardo Patterson made his first archaeological find at age 7 in a yam field in his native Costa Rica -- a piece of clay pottery his cousin said could be thousands of years old. It launched a lifelong fascination with pre-Columbian art, and a career checkered by charges of smuggling and selling forgeries. In April, Munich police seized more than 1,000 Aztec, Maya, Olmec and Inca antiquities from Patterson after an international investigation and a chase across Europe. "The guy is legendary in the field," said Michael Coe, a retired Yale anthropology professor who told authorities that a 1997 Patterson exhibit in Spain included possible fakes.
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