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Salvador Plascencia

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July 3, 2005 | Daniel Hernandez, Daniel Hernandez is a Times staff writer.
It's hard not to draw comparisons between Salvador Plascencia's first novel, "The People of Paper," and Gabriel Garcia Marquez's seminal masterpiece, "One Hundred Years of Solitude." Both drolly tell of fantastical, impossible happenings. Both unravel sagas of war, love, longing and death. Both chart one family's tumultuous search for equilibrium. But Plascencia's may not be the book that "saves" magical realism.
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April 25, 2010 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Aside from their proximity in age, and the fulsome praise they got for their debut novels, Salvador Plascencia and Michael Jaime-Becerra would appear to have little in common as writers. Plascencia's "The People of Paper," which was published in 2005 by McSweeney's Books, is a fiendishly inventive meta-fiction that has drawn comparisons to the house-of-mirrors stories of John Barth and Italo Calvino, the self-reflexive screenplays of Charlie Kaufman and the gasp-inducing travelogues of the 16th century Spanish explorer Alvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2010 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Aside from their proximity in age, and the fulsome praise they got for their debut novels, Salvador Plascencia and Michael Jaime-Becerra would appear to have little in common as writers. Plascencia's "The People of Paper," which was published in 2005 by McSweeney's Books, is a fiendishly inventive meta-fiction that has drawn comparisons to the house-of-mirrors stories of John Barth and Italo Calvino, the self-reflexive screenplays of Charlie Kaufman and the gasp-inducing travelogues of the 16th century Spanish explorer Alvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca.
BOOKS
July 3, 2005 | Daniel Hernandez, Daniel Hernandez is a Times staff writer.
It's hard not to draw comparisons between Salvador Plascencia's first novel, "The People of Paper," and Gabriel Garcia Marquez's seminal masterpiece, "One Hundred Years of Solitude." Both drolly tell of fantastical, impossible happenings. Both unravel sagas of war, love, longing and death. Both chart one family's tumultuous search for equilibrium. But Plascencia's may not be the book that "saves" magical realism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1990 | LAURA PITTER
A Camarillo resident who became homeless after city officials evicted her from her decaying house, filled with trash up to the ceilings, sold the duplex for $135,500, city officials said Thursday. Kelton Roberts, 64, took to the streets after her house was declared a health hazard about 20 months ago. City officials removed about 100 tons of garbage that had begun to fester and mold in her home.
MAGAZINE
July 31, 2005 | MARK EHRMAN
Meeting Salvador Plascencia, the author of "The People of Paper," one half expects to find his pants on fire. Born in Mexico and raised in the San Gabriel Valley town of El Monte, the 28-year-old has made his acclaimed debut with a book set largely in El Monte and Mexico and called "part memoir, part lies." Plascencia's El Monte is a magical realist dream world that doubles as a war-torn front line in a mythic struggle against sadness.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1997 | COLL METCALFE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a split vote Thursday, the Ventura County Planning Commission denied an Oxnard company's request to locate a recycling facility at the old Egg City chicken ranch north of Moorpark. After listening to more than four hours of complaints from neighbors of the property, the commission voted 3 to 2 to deny the permit. They said increased truck traffic would only exacerbate congestion on roads surrounding the area. "To add to truck traffic in the area is just unconscionable. . . .
BOOKS
September 18, 2005
*--* SO. CAL. RATING Fiction LAST WEEK WEEKS ON LIST *--* *--* 1 Eldest (Inheritance, Book 2) by Christopher Paolini 3 2 (Alfred A. Knopf: $21) Eragon hones his battle skills as his cousin finds himself the target of evil forces. 2 Lunar Park by Bret Easton Ellis (Alfred A. Knopf: 2 4 $24.95) The author-turned-protagonist tries to dry out and remake his life in a suburbia possessed by strange spirits. 3 The Historian by Elizabeth Kostova (Little, Brown: 1 13 $25.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2006 | James Verini, Special to The Times
Last Saturday, while you were busy doing something stupid, maybe knocking back that beer that put you over the edge -- or was that you skulking guiltily into "Da Vinci Code" at the ArcLight, refusing to yell "thank you!" at that nice usher? -- some of your fellow Angelenos were having a much smarter evening at the Barnsdall Gallery Theater in Hollywood.
BOOKS
November 6, 2005 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Susan Salter Reynolds is a Times staff writer.
THIS year's Man Booker Prize-winning novel, "The Sea" by the Irish writer John Banville, represents a vote for the importance of language over plot. Plot, after all, comes and goes; elegant language remains. It pierces deep into the human condition. It tells us who and what we are. And the Irish are the undisputed masters of language. "[The English] forced it down our throats," says Irish playwright and novelist Sebastian Barry, whose novel "A Long Long Way" was on this year's Booker shortlist.
BOOKS
December 4, 2005
The Sea John Banville Alfred A. Knopf Max, an almost completely unlovable art critic, returns to the landscape of his childhood as a way of dealing with adult grief. Banville reveals the cold, dispassionate reliability of the storyteller; behind him the great, fallible beauty of language; behind language, the wind, the weather, time and the sea.
MAGAZINE
November 13, 2005 | Alan Rifkin, Alan Rifkin is the author of "Signal Hill: Stories" (City Lights Books), a collection of short stories and a novella.
The vision comes and goes. You can still picture, if only barely, Evelyn Waugh arriving back when not everything here had been named yet, and seeing the double meanings laid so bare--oasis and dust, paradise and exile--that he finished a novel in 10 weeks ("The Loved One," his sendup of an immortality-crazed mortuary) after it had taken him three years to write the one before. Of course the ironies have gotten a bit gentrified since then.
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