Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSalvador Salazar Arrue
IN THE NEWS

Salvador Salazar Arrue

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2009 | Reed Johnson
Collective memory in El Salvador has long been a fragile commodity. An infamous 1932 government massacre of mainly Indian peasants was officially purged from history books for decades afterward. The country's brutal 12-year civil war of 1980-92 not only claimed tens of thousands of lives and razed entire villages. It also ravaged the country's heritage, fostering widespread amnesia about Salvadoran literature, music, indigenous culture and the performing arts. Over the next week, an ambitious multimedia happening with the umbrella title "Preservación de la Memoria Histórica Salvadoreña" (Salvadoran Preservation of Historic Memory)
ARTICLES BY DATE
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2005 | Reed Johnson, Times Staff Writer
His name was Salvador Salazar Arrue, or Salarrue for short, and he's the greatest Central American writer you've probably never heard of. Even here in his homeland, just a few years ago, nobody much was talking about Salarrue. Nobody, that is, except people like Ricardo Aguilar. "My relation to Salarrue and his family didn't stop, it doesn't stop, but I don't mind because he was a great man," says Aguilar, speaking of his late friend, artistic mentor and lifelong obsession.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|