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NEWS
April 4, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Flush with optimism in 1985, El Salvador's top military officer, Gen. Adolfo Blandon, announced that guerrillas battling the government were "wearing down" and had lost the capacity to undertake large military attacks. Last summer, Blandon asserted that the guerrillas had been reduced to a third of their fighting force. And just last month, one of Blandon's field commanders boasted that the rebels were nearly routed from the battle-worn province of Chalatenango.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2006 | Hector Becerra, Times Staff Writer
Gonzalo Guevara Cerritos was a decorated, American-trained officer in the Salvadoran army. But for the last year, the 43-year-old toiled as a janitor at a West Los Angeles-area motel, a man with a secret who was always looking over his shoulder, his girlfriend said. His clandestine existence came to an end Wednesday, when federal authorities announced that they had arrested him as an illegal immigrant who was a human rights violator.
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NEWS
March 31, 1985 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
The army was in town and the guerrillas were hiding in the hills. Col. Sigifredo Ochoa's jeep came rumbling up the dusty mountain road and stopped at the plaza. The colonel greeted troops, chatted with local leaders, and checked to make sure that several cardboard ballot boxes were in safe keeping.
NEWS
November 24, 1991 | Associated Press
The legal aid office of the Roman Catholic Church has issued a detailed report on the alleged massacre of more than 1,000 peasant farmers--men, women, children and elderly--in the province of Morazan by army troops in 1981. Tutela Legal, as the office is known, said in its 81-page report issued earlier this month that the 13-month-old judicial investigation into the massacre is bogged down and called for renewed efforts to move it forward.
NEWS
May 22, 1985
Leftist Salvadoran rebels announced that starting today, they will stop traffic on all the nation's highways and sabotage electrical services throughout the country in their five-year-old war against the U.S.-backed government. Meanwhile, the Salvadoran army reported the discovery of large caches of weapons and medical supplies--two in northern Chaletenango province and one in southern San Vicente province.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1985
Recent reports from El Salvador indicate that government forces have begun to escalate the level of fighting in the civil war, with encouragement from the Reagan Administration. Peace will come to that country only with a balanced approach that holds guerrilla forces at bay long enough to bargain them back into the constitutional system. But the new tilt toward a military solution threatens that balance. U.S.
NEWS
January 19, 1985 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration has decided to ask Congress for additional military and economic aid to El Salvador this year to help shore up the authority of President Jose Napoleon Duarte, White House spokesman Larry Speakes said Friday. The new request, which drew a skeptical reaction from Democrats in Congress, could bring military aid to El Salvador to a record level of about $200 million, officials said.
NEWS
May 16, 1985 | Associated Press
President Reagan, after a meeting with Salvadoran President Jose Napoleon Duarte, today praised the "heartwarming progress" that Duarte's country has made in consolidating democratic rule and in improving protection of human rights. With Duarte standing at his side, Reagan said the progress El Salvador has made would not have been possible without U.S. assistance, and he suggested that U.S. goals in Nicaragua will not be achieved if the Congress continues to deny aid to the contras.
NEWS
April 1, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Leftist guerrillas launched a pre-dawn attack on a major Salvadoran army base Tuesday, killing at least 43 soldiers and a U.S. military adviser, who became the first to die in combat during the country's seven-year civil war. Salvadoran army officials said another 35 soldiers were wounded in the surprise assault on the army's 4th Infantry Brigade, including the unit's commander, Col. Gilberto Rubio, who was slightly injured in one hand.
NEWS
November 24, 1991 | Associated Press
The legal aid office of the Roman Catholic Church has issued a detailed report on the alleged massacre of more than 1,000 peasant farmers--men, women, children and elderly--in the province of Morazan by army troops in 1981. Tutela Legal, as the office is known, said in its 81-page report issued earlier this month that the 13-month-old judicial investigation into the massacre is bogged down and called for renewed efforts to move it forward.
NEWS
November 16, 1991 | From Associated Press
Hundreds of government troops deployed Friday in traditional rebel strongholds around Guazapa Mountain in an open dismissal of the guerrillas' announcement of a unilateral truce, which was supposed to take effect today. "Our institution cannot trust in their false promises," said Lt. Col. Baltazar Lopez Hernandez of the Armed Forces Press Committee.
NEWS
May 27, 1991 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what Western diplomats say is an attempt to "buy off" dissatisfied Salvadoran army officers, the United States is planning a multimillion-dollar educational and job training program for soldiers who will be dismissed when the country's civil war ends. The officials say the money for it will come from whatever is left from this year's U.S. military aid program of $85 million and will make up a large part of the $92 million that the Bush Administration is seeking for 1992.
NEWS
November 21, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Hundreds of leftist rebels attacked more than a dozen military positions across El Salvador on Tuesday, leaving at least 27 people dead and 141 wounded, authorities said. Rebel and military sources said the overnight clashes took place in the provinces of Morazan, Usulutan, Chalatenango, La Paz, San Salvador, Cuscatlan and La Libertad.
NEWS
April 4, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Flush with optimism in 1985, El Salvador's top military officer, Gen. Adolfo Blandon, announced that guerrillas battling the government were "wearing down" and had lost the capacity to undertake large military attacks. Last summer, Blandon asserted that the guerrillas had been reduced to a third of their fighting force. And just last month, one of Blandon's field commanders boasted that the rebels were nearly routed from the battle-worn province of Chalatenango.
NEWS
April 1, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Leftist guerrillas launched a pre-dawn attack on a major Salvadoran army base Tuesday, killing at least 43 soldiers and a U.S. military adviser, who became the first to die in combat during the country's seven-year civil war. Salvadoran army officials said another 35 soldiers were wounded in the surprise assault on the army's 4th Infantry Brigade, including the unit's commander, Col. Gilberto Rubio, who was slightly injured in one hand.
NEWS
May 22, 1985
Leftist Salvadoran rebels announced that starting today, they will stop traffic on all the nation's highways and sabotage electrical services throughout the country in their five-year-old war against the U.S.-backed government. Meanwhile, the Salvadoran army reported the discovery of large caches of weapons and medical supplies--two in northern Chaletenango province and one in southern San Vicente province.
NEWS
November 21, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Hundreds of leftist rebels attacked more than a dozen military positions across El Salvador on Tuesday, leaving at least 27 people dead and 141 wounded, authorities said. Rebel and military sources said the overnight clashes took place in the provinces of Morazan, Usulutan, Chalatenango, La Paz, San Salvador, Cuscatlan and La Libertad.
NEWS
May 16, 1985 | Associated Press
President Reagan, after a meeting with Salvadoran President Jose Napoleon Duarte, today praised the "heartwarming progress" that Duarte's country has made in consolidating democratic rule and in improving protection of human rights. With Duarte standing at his side, Reagan said the progress El Salvador has made would not have been possible without U.S. assistance, and he suggested that U.S. goals in Nicaragua will not be achieved if the Congress continues to deny aid to the contras.
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