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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2012 | By Frank Shyong, Los Angeles Times
Maria Montenegro became one of the first Salvadoran restaurant owners in Los Angeles when she opened El Migueleno on Vermont Avenue in 1969, financed by a $5,000 loan sealed on a handshake. Back then it was a tiny kitchen in a neighborhood dominated by African Americans and Mexican immigrants. Customers would eye Montenegro's cheese-filled pupusas and ask why the restaurant served such thick tortillas. Today, El Migueleno has more than doubled in size and customers. In the past her family sold off their jewelry and cars to keep the restaurant afloat.
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NATIONAL
February 6, 2014 | By Lalita Clozel
WASHINGTON - A former Salvadoran general accused of overseeing the torture and killing of thousands of civilians during a 12-year civil war appealed a U.S. deportation order Thursday on the grounds that his nation's anti-communist campaign was backed and funded by the American government. An attorney for Carlos Eugenio Vides Casanova, who was El Salvador's defense minister and leader of the National Guard in the 1980s, repeatedly cited the U.S. support for his country's right-wing government during its war against leftist guerrillas.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2012 | By Sam Quinones, Los Angeles Times
Under cloudless skies and a radiant sun, a couple of hundred Salvadorans dressed in white gathered early Saturday to name an intersection near downtown Los Angeles in honor of Msgr. Oscar A. Romero, a Catholic archbishop who was slain in 1980 during El Salvador's civil war and whom many consider a martyr. White doves were released; a tree was planted. Speakers recounted Romero's struggle on behalf of the poor and his assassination. His words - "If they kill me, I will be reborn in the Salvadoran people" - were invoked throughout the morning.
WORLD
February 1, 2014 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY - Salvadorans vote Sunday in a presidential election that may give former leftist rebels a second chance at government - or return national leadership to the right-wing party that ruled the country for two decades. Opinion surveys have shown an extremely tight race, especially with the entrance of a new third party run by a former conservative president with family members tied to notorious corruption cases. More than 20 years after the end of a civil war in which more than 75,000 people were killed, choices remain stark in El Salvador, the tiny Central American country that, after Mexico, is the leading source of Spanish-speaking immigrants in Southern California.
NEWS
March 7, 1999 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration is considering a plan that would make it much easier for hundreds of thousands of Salvadoran and Guatemalan immigrants to gain legal residency after living for years under the threat of deportation. The murky legal status of perhaps more than 500,000 Salvadoran and Guatemalan immigrants--most of whom arrived during the 1980s as warfare engulfed the two nations--has long been an unresolved dilemma of U.S. law and a source of tension with regional governments.
NEWS
September 11, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The government announced the arrest of a Salvadoran man in connection with recent explosions in Havana that killed an Italian businessman. The Interior Ministry also accused the Cuban American National Foundation, a Miami-based exile group, of organizing the blasts and paying Salvadoran Raul Ernesto Cruz Leon to carry them out.
NEWS
May 2, 1989
A federal judge in Los Angeles has halted the deportation of several hundred Salvadorans from a U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service dention facility in Texas, ruling that the detainees have been denied access to telephones and lawyers in order to apply for political asylum in this country. In a ruling issued Friday, U.S. District Judge David V. Kenyon held that INS officials were in violation of an April, 1988, order he authored requiring the agency to provide help for Salvadorans seeking political asylum.
NEWS
March 29, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Emilio Gonzalez arrived on an overnight flight from Los Angeles with tired eyes, a stubble beard and a sigh of resignation. As the 45-year-old factory worker stepped out of the terminal building at El Salvador's Comalapa International Airport, young boys swarmed to his side, hawking lottery tickets and begging for spare change.
NEWS
January 3, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
El Salvador's army chief of staff said the armed forces began implementing a new military plan Wednesday that could crush leftist guerrillas and end the country's civil war this year. Gen. Adolfo Blandon said the plan involves psychological operations, refined military maneuvers, civic action projects and the formation of specially equipped and trained small units for night strikes against the rebels.
NEWS
April 27, 1987 | DON IRWIN and DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writers
El Salvador's President Jose Napoleon Duarte has asked President Reagan to bend the new U.S. immigration law to provide temporary refuge for perhaps half a million Salvadorans who have entered this country illegally, a State Department official confirmed Sunday.
SPORTS
October 22, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
FIFA, world's soccer's governing body, has imposed global bans on three more Salvadoran players, bringing to 19 the number suspended for their role in match-fixing. The players were not identified but one was banned for six months, a second for a year and third for five years. During the suspension the players are prohibited from engaging in any soccer-related activities. Earlier this month FIFA announced 16 global sanctions, including 14 lifetime bans. The penalties were handed down after a probe into numerous international matches including El Salvador's 5-0 loss to Mexico in the 2011 Gold Cup and a 2-1 loss to the U.S. in a 2010 friendly.
SPORTS
October 14, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
FIFA on Monday announced it has banned 14 current and former members of El Salvador's national soccer team for life for match fixing. Another two players received six-month and 18-month bans, respectively. The Salvadoran national federation last month banned the players from ever again representing the country in international play. The FIFA extension will keep the players from participating in any FIFA-sanctioned event. El Salvador launched an investigation into charges that players were involved in manipulating four international matches in 2010 and 2011, including a 2-1 loss to the U.S. in a friendly and a 5-0 loss to Mexico in the 2011 CONCACAF Gold Cup. Matches involving the country's U-20 team were also part of the probe.
WORLD
August 28, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY -- The long quest to bring the Salvadoran military killers of six Jesuit priests to justice has received a significant boost, human rights activists say, with the sentencing of a former commander -- on unrelated charges in a faraway Boston court. The activists say the 21-month jail term for former Col. Inocente Orlando Montano will give a Spanish court time to extradite him to Spain, where he would stand trial for the 1989 slayings. β€œThe important thing is to have him in custody,” said attorney Almudena Bernabeu of the San Francisco-based Center for Justice and Accountability, which has been championing the case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2013 | By Robert J. Lopez, Los Angeles Times
Members of the Salvadoran community in Los Angeles realized a long-awaited dream Saturday when groundbreaking began on a plaza to honor Msgr. Oscar A. Romero, a Catholic archbishop who was slain in 1980 during El Salvador's civil war. Romero, an outspoken advocate for the poor and a revered figure for many Central Americans, was shot while celebrating Mass by an assassin with suspected ties to right-wing government security forces. El Salvador's bloody 12-year civil war claimed tens of thousands of lives and sparked an exodus of Salvadorans.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
The death of Salvadoran poet Roque Dalton in 1975 is one of the great tragedies of Latin American literature and of the Latin American left. And it was a tragedy the left inflicted on itself. Dalton had joined one of the armed rebel groups fighting against El Salvador's dictatorship. He had, by then, already established an international reputation as a writer. Most of his best writing came during his exile in Cuba, where he wrote seven books of poetry, and β€œ Miguel Marmol ,” a biography of a 1930s Salvadoran revolutionary that's one of the great, underappreciated masterpieces of Latin American historical writing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2012 | By Frank Shyong, Los Angeles Times
Maria Montenegro became one of the first Salvadoran restaurant owners in Los Angeles when she opened El Migueleno on Vermont Avenue in 1969, financed by a $5,000 loan sealed on a handshake. Back then it was a tiny kitchen in a neighborhood dominated by African Americans and Mexican immigrants. Customers would eye Montenegro's cheese-filled pupusas and ask why the restaurant served such thick tortillas. Today, El Migueleno has more than doubled in size and customers. In the past her family sold off their jewelry and cars to keep the restaurant afloat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1991 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marlene Rivera made a decision Friday that went against her survival instincts cultivated during years of civil war in El Salvador and refugee life in Los Angeles. Rivera went to a crowded legal aid office in North Hollywood and gave her name, address and other information to the government. She is one of thousands of applicants citywide for a program giving undocumented Salvadoran refugees permission to live and work for 18 months in the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2001 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Salvadorans living in California tend to be long-term residents who are generally better educated than immigrants from Mexico, according to a UCLA study released Wednesday. Two-thirds of the state's Salvadorans have been here 14 years or more, the study said. "This is a well-established community that is here to stay," said the study's author, David Hayes-Bautista, who directs UCLA's Center for the Study of Latino Health and Culture.
SPORTS
August 22, 2012 | By Kevin Baxter
When: 7. Where: Home Depot Center. On the air: TV: Fox Soccer, Galavision; Radio: 1220, 1330. Records: Galaxy (0-0 in CCL), Isidro Metapan 1-0. Record vs. Isidro Metapan: First meeting. Update: The Galaxy, still smarting from its March quarterfinal loss in its last CONCACAF Champions League game, gets started on a new CCL campaign against the winner of five of the last eight First Division titles in El Salvador. And like the Galaxy, the Salvadoran club made it to the quarterfinals of the last CCL before being eliminated.
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