Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSalvadorans Honduras
IN THE NEWS

Salvadorans Honduras

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 13, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
More than 8,000 Salvadoran refugees, many of whom have spent eight years in U.N. camps in Honduras, will begin returning home this month, a U.N. refugee spokesman said. "If all goes as planned, this will be the biggest repatriation of refugees in Central American history," said Carlos Mondonado of the of Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees. About 1,500 Salvadorans at a U.N.-run camp in Colomoncagua, two miles from the Salvadoran border, are due to go home Sunday, he said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 13, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
More than 8,000 Salvadoran refugees, many of whom have spent eight years in U.N. camps in Honduras, will begin returning home this month, a U.N. refugee spokesman said. "If all goes as planned, this will be the biggest repatriation of refugees in Central American history," said Carlos Mondonado of the of Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees. About 1,500 Salvadorans at a U.N.-run camp in Colomoncagua, two miles from the Salvadoran border, are due to go home Sunday, he said.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 1, 1990 | PATRICK McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After nine years, Jose Hernandez and other Salvadoran refugees say they have had enough. Enough of fences, military guards and the stifling confines of a camp situated alongside this hamlet near the El Salvadoran border. Enough of what they view as fruitless expectation of improvements in the land of their birth, split by bloody civil war for a decade. Enough of allegations that they are actively collaborating with the insurgents there.
NEWS
January 1, 1990 | PATRICK McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After nine years, Jose Hernandez and other Salvadoran refugees say they have had enough. Enough of fences, military guards and the stifling confines of a camp situated alongside this hamlet near the El Salvadoran border. Enough of what they view as fruitless expectation of improvements in the land of their birth, split by bloody civil war for a decade. Enough of allegations that they are actively collaborating with the insurgents there.
NEWS
March 18, 1985 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
A controversial military training base staffed by the U.S. Army on the north coast of Honduras is scheduled to close soon because this country will no longer allow troops from neighboring El Salvador to be trained at the base. The United States told Honduras earlier this month that $18.5 million in U.S. funds, allocated by Congress in 1984, is no longer available for the Regional Military Training Center, which is near the city of Puerto Castilla on the Caribbean.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|