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NEWS
January 12, 1992 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 12 years, the civil war in El Salvador echoed loudly in Los Angeles and transformed the city. Tens of thousands of Salvadorans took up residence in the Los Angeles area during the last decade, converting a tiny refugee enclave into a huge, thriving community. From pupusas to political activism, Salvadoran influence became known in wide circles, often mirroring here the conflict at home.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2001 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
When Salvadoran immigrants asked Immanuel Presbyterian Church to give temporary shelter to their most important religious icon, the ramifications went well beyond the walls of the Wilshire Boulevard sanctuary. The life-sized statue of the Divine Savior of the World represents the Salvadoran community's national namesake and is a symbol of unity.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1993 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Excoriating El Salvador's military as "terrorists," some members of Los Angeles' exiled Salvadoran community marched outside the Central American nation's consulate Tuesday and demanded that President Alfredo Cristiani adhere to a United Nations plan to purge the armed forces of known human rights abusers. "There can be no real peace if the military and its worst elements remain in control," said Isabel Beltran, who was among those leading the chants of dissension.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1999 | ANTONIO OLIVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sure, $550 spread among three City Council candidates is not likely to win any elections. But to Southern California's approximately 750,000 residents with roots in El Salvador, that money--raised for races in Los Angeles and Glendale by Salvadoran Americans--represents a major victory. With it, members of this fast-growing community have staked their claim in local politics, hoping to emerge from obscurity and elect a few of their own.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1995 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Time is running out for tens of thousands of El Salvadoran immigrants in the Los Angeles area who must file political asylum claims soon to retain their legal status in the United States, community groups and U.S. immigration officials warned Tuesday. Thousands of Salvadorans will lose their work permits this fall and become illegal immigrants--subject to loss of jobs and even deportation--if they fail to file applications.
NEWS
December 6, 1989 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA
Martha Arevalo is one of the 350,000 Salvadorans in Los Angeles haunted by the news from their homeland: danger, destruction and the delay of peace in Central America. In El Salvador, there is no wall being chiseled away, no voice of democracy taking over, no cause for celebration. "Unlike the events in (Eastern) Europe, there has been only news of death and terror in my part of the world," says Arevalo, 19, who is studying psychology at Loyola Marymount University.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1998 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Salvadoran and Guatemalan immigrants in Los Angeles believe inadequate schools are their children's most pressing problem and fault the quality and effectiveness of instruction in English, which they view as critical for assimilation to American life, according to authors of a study released Wednesday by two leading Latino institutes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1989 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The real battles are being fought with AK-47s and helicopter gunships in the mountain jungles of El Salvador and the working-class suburbs of its capital city. But with anywhere from 350,000 to 500,000 Salvadorans living in Southern California, some skirmishes from El Salvador's intensified civil war have inevitably spilled over into the Central American barrios of Pico-Union and Westlake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2001 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
When Salvadoran immigrants asked Immanuel Presbyterian Church to give temporary shelter to their most important religious icon, the ramifications went well beyond the walls of the Wilshire Boulevard sanctuary. The life-sized statue of the Divine Savior of the World represents the Salvadoran community's national namesake and is a symbol of unity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1999 | ANTONIO OLIVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sure, $550 spread among three City Council candidates is not likely to win any elections. But to Southern California's approximately 750,000 residents with roots in El Salvador, that money--raised for races in Los Angeles and Glendale by Salvadoran Americans--represents a major victory. With it, members of this fast-growing community have staked their claim in local politics, hoping to emerge from obscurity and elect a few of their own.
BUSINESS
June 26, 1998 | STEPHEN GREGORY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Indicating the esteem El Salvador holds for the business prowess of its emigrants, diplomats and economic planners from the Central American country came a-courting their plucky expatriates Thursday, seeking help in carrying out the tiny nation's ambitious development plans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1998 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Salvadoran and Guatemalan immigrants in Los Angeles believe inadequate schools are their children's most pressing problem and fault the quality and effectiveness of instruction in English, which they view as critical for assimilation to American life, according to authors of a study released Wednesday by two leading Latino institutes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1996
Despite news accounts about an extended deadline, the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service has reiterated that tens of thousands of Salvadorans filing for political asylum under the favorable terms of a federal court settlement have only one week left to submit their applications.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1995 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Time is running out for tens of thousands of El Salvadoran immigrants in the Los Angeles area who must file political asylum claims soon to retain their legal status in the United States, community groups and U.S. immigration officials warned Tuesday. Thousands of Salvadorans will lose their work permits this fall and become illegal immigrants--subject to loss of jobs and even deportation--if they fail to file applications.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1995
When Adalia Zelada's parents left El Salvador in the 1970s, they never imagined that their daughter would go there one day as anything but a tourist. But last week, the UCLA freshman joined 12 other college students who are studying social and economic issues in El Salvador. The summer program is sponsored by the Central American Resource Center in Pico-Union. Like Zelada, most of the students are Los Angeles residents of Salvadoran descent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1995 | LESLIE BERESTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Friends and neighbors gathered outside Francisco Ayala's East Hollywood apartment building, eager to catch a last glimpse of a bright red ambulance before it left Saturday on its mission of mercy to a small, impoverished town in El Salvador. Ayala and a group of former neighbors from the town of Estanzuelas raised $6,000 to buy the ambulance, which Ayala kept in his apartment garage.
BUSINESS
June 26, 1998 | STEPHEN GREGORY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Indicating the esteem El Salvador holds for the business prowess of its emigrants, diplomats and economic planners from the Central American country came a-courting their plucky expatriates Thursday, seeking help in carrying out the tiny nation's ambitious development plans.
NEWS
January 17, 1992 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the heart of the largest Salvadoran community in the United States, Salvadorans, activists and others Thursday toasted peace with bottles of champagne, lit candles and raised their voices in song. Gathered on a street corner along the edge of Los Angeles' MacArthur Park, about 100 people stood under blue and white Salvadoran flags and watched laughing as several in the group opened champagne bottles, the corks soaring in the air, and sprayed the crowd with foam. "Viva, El Salvador!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1995
Dinora Marroquin had worked for it. The El Salvador native endured 1 1/2-hour bus rides from her Koreatown home to Birmingham High school in Van Nuys. She tackled advanced placement classes in English, though she spoke no English before she was 7 years old. And in February, she was one letter away from her dream: A scholarship to the prestigious Scripps College for women. But the letter never came. There was a mix-up on the address attached to her financial aid form, it turned out.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1995 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dinora Marroquin had worked for it. She endured 1 1/2-hour bus rides from her Koreatown home to Birmingham High School in Van Nuys. She tackled advanced placement classes in English, though English is not her native language. And in February, she was one letter away from her dream: A scholarship to the prestigious Scripps College. But the letter never came. There was a mix-up on the address attached to her financial aid form, it turned out.
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