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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1999 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The standing-room crowd was attentive, if perplexed, as the lawyer explained the fine points from an auditorium stage in Los Angeles' Pico-Union neighborhood. Begin putting together rent receipts, paycheck stubs, tax returns and other documentation that show how long you have lived here, advised the attorney, Raquel Fonte of the Central American Resource Center. Do not try to file applications without first consulting with a legitimate legal assistance office.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1999 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The standing-room crowd was attentive, if perplexed, as the lawyer explained the fine points from an auditorium stage in Los Angeles' Pico-Union neighborhood. Begin putting together rent receipts, paycheck stubs, tax returns and other documentation that show how long you have lived here, advised the attorney, Raquel Fonte of the Central American Resource Center. Do not try to file applications without first consulting with a legitimate legal assistance office.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1994 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN
A car owned by two slain Salvadoran brothers, whose bodies were found last week in the Santa Monica Mountains, was found Wednesday parked along a Canoga Park street, authorities said. Deputy Rich Erickson of the Sheriff's Headquarters Bureau said residents in the 24000 block of Hamlin Street called the Los Angeles Police Department about the 1981 brown, two-door, Chevrolet Chevette. They told police the car had been parked there since Sunday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1994 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN
A car owned by two slain Salvadoran brothers, whose bodies were found last week in the Santa Monica Mountains, was found Wednesday parked along a Canoga Park street, authorities said. Deputy Rich Erickson of the Sheriff's Headquarters Bureau said residents in the 24000 block of Hamlin Street called the Los Angeles Police Department about the 1981 brown, two-door, Chevrolet Chevette. They told police the car had been parked there since Sunday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1994 | ANTONIO OLIVO and ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Mauricio Molina came to Northridge from El Salvador six years ago at the age of 17 with the same dreams as so many of his countrymen: to make enough money to send some home to his mother, seven younger brothers and a younger sister. His brother Luis followed him with the same intentions more than a year ago. The two toiled as day laborers, hoping to eventually make enough money to return home and buy their family a farm.
NEWS
May 25, 1991 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven years ago, after they had completed a hazardous crossing of the U.S.-Mexico border, 14-year-old Miguel Perez made one last promise to his dying mother--he would "be somebody" and succeed in this country. On Friday, the young Salvadoran immigrant completed the promise by graduating from Cal State Dominguez Hills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1994 | ANTONIO OLIVO and ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Mauricio Molina came to Northridge from El Salvador six years ago, at age 17, with the same dreams as so many of his countrymen: to make enough money to send some home to his mother, seven younger brothers and a younger sister. Just a little over a year ago, his brother Luis joined him with the same intentions. The two toiled as day laborers, hoping to one day make enough money to return home and buy their family a farm. They will never get there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1990 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nightmare that Oscar Cabrera banishes by day returns to haunt his dreams at night. He is driving with relatives through his homeland of El Salvador when they pass a man who sits, propped up against a cemetery wall. His limp body is riddled with bullets, his lifeless eyes stare vacantly. Suddenly, the two change places. Now it is 15-year-old Oscar who sits, propped up like a rag doll. He sees his family drive by but can't move. His mouth gapes open, but he can't speak.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1994
Two young men found shot to death in a state park were identified as brothers from El Salvador but there were no leads on who killed them, authorities said Monday. Luis Molina, 19, and Mauricio Molina, 23, were found dead Friday in a creek bed at Malibu Creek State Park. Both were shot once in the head with a small-caliber handgun. One was also shot in the back.
NEWS
December 30, 1993 | SANDRA HERNANDEZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Andre Rallion began sketching outlines of volcanoes on a napkin last January, his dream was to design a float that would represent the Salvadoran community in the Tournament of Roses. Nearly a year later, his vision has come to life, and a float representing El Salvador will roll through the streets of Pasadena on New Year's Day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1994 | ANTONIO OLIVO and ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Mauricio Molina came to Northridge from El Salvador six years ago at the age of 17 with the same dreams as so many of his countrymen: to make enough money to send some home to his mother, seven younger brothers and a younger sister. His brother Luis followed him with the same intentions more than a year ago. The two toiled as day laborers, hoping to eventually make enough money to return home and buy their family a farm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1994 | ANTONIO OLIVO and ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Mauricio Molina came to Northridge from El Salvador six years ago, at age 17, with the same dreams as so many of his countrymen: to make enough money to send some home to his mother, seven younger brothers and a younger sister. Just a little over a year ago, his brother Luis joined him with the same intentions. The two toiled as day laborers, hoping to one day make enough money to return home and buy their family a farm. They will never get there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1994
Two young men found shot to death in a state park were identified as brothers from El Salvador but there were no leads on who killed them, authorities said Monday. Luis Molina, 19, and Mauricio Molina, 23, were found dead Friday in a creek bed at Malibu Creek State Park. Both were shot once in the head with a small-caliber handgun. One was also shot in the back.
NEWS
May 25, 1991 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven years ago, after they had completed a hazardous crossing of the U.S.-Mexico border, 14-year-old Miguel Perez made one last promise to his dying mother--he would "be somebody" and succeed in this country. On Friday, the young Salvadoran immigrant completed the promise by graduating from Cal State Dominguez Hills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1990 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nightmare that Oscar Cabrera banishes by day returns to haunt his dreams at night. He is driving with relatives through his homeland of El Salvador when they pass a man who sits, propped up against a cemetery wall. His limp body is riddled with bullets, his lifeless eyes stare vacantly. Suddenly, the two change places. Now it is 15-year-old Oscar who sits, propped up like a rag doll. He sees his family drive by but can't move. His mouth gapes open, but he can't speak.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1991 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marlene Rivera made a decision Friday that went against her survival instincts cultivated during years of civil war in El Salvador and refugee life in Los Angeles. Rivera went to a crowded legal aid office in North Hollywood and gave her name, address and other information to the government. She is one of thousands of applicants citywide for a program giving undocumented Salvadoran refugees permission to live and work for 18 months in the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2008 | Esmeralda Bermudez, Bermudez is a Times staff writer.
Juan Carlos Rivera knew that if he wanted to get a dishwashing job at the MacArthur Park hamburger stand, he would have to pretend to be Mexican. But the thought of lying made the Salvadoran anxious. He paced outside the restaurant, worried that his melodic Spanish accent, his use of the Central American vos, instead of the Mexican tu, would give him away. Resolving to say as little as possible, Rivera remembers steeling himself and stepping inside -- into the world of Mexicanization.
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