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November 18, 1989 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Fernando Jacob, a recent emigre from El Salvador, walked into a popular Salvadoran restaurant and meeting place Friday afternoon, he wanted a lot more than lunch. The 34-year-old Santa Ana resident was looking for fellow countrymen to talk about the violence in their war-torn country and to curse the hundreds of miles between them and loved ones back home.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1993
A woman convicted of attempted murder for dropping her newborn son out a first-floor window was sentenced Wednesday to a program for the mentally retarded, but will probably be deported to El Salvador instead. Since last month, Deputy Public Defender Marri Derby has unsuccessfully tried to block the deportation of Maria Bonilla, 22, who has an IQ of 61 and is mentally retarded.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1991 | MARIA NEWMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I had a home, but I left it because of the trouble," Ricardo said. "When I returned to the home with my family, we found it had been destroyed, erased during fighting between guerrillas and the army." Like many of the 800,000 Salvadorans in the United States--with as many as 70,000 in Orange County--Ricardo fled his country because a 10-year-old civil war had made it impossible for his family to stay in one place and make a living.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1993 | THUAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The mother of a dying leukemia patient was granted an emergency visa Tuesday to come here from El Salvador to visit her son at his hospital bed, and the family said she probably will arrive Sunday. A friend of the sick man, Fernando Pedrosa, 25, will fly to El Salvador to accompany the patient's mother, Adela Lopez, back to California. "I called her at 4:30 a.m. (Tuesday) and told her to get ready because I had a feeling it was going to be approved," Pedrosa's cousin, Isaias Lopez, said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1993 | THUAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The mother of a dying leukemia patient was granted an emergency visa Tuesday to come here from El Salvador to visit her son at his hospital bed, and the family said she probably will arrive Sunday. A friend of the sick man, Fernando Pedrosa, 25, will fly to El Salvador to accompany the patient's mother, Adela Lopez, back to California. "I called her at 4:30 a.m. (Tuesday) and told her to get ready because I had a feeling it was going to be approved," Pedrosa's cousin, Isaias Lopez, said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1991 | BOB ELSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Efforts by a coalition to persuade illegal Salvadoran immigrants to register for temporary residency before the Thursday deadline are being crippled by distrust and fear of government bureaucracy, officials said Friday. About 40,000 of an estimated 48,000 eligible Salvadoran immigrants in the county have not registered for protection, according to Lilia Powell, director of the Orange County Coalition for Immigrants Rights and Responsibilities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1993
A woman convicted of attempted murder for dropping her newborn son out a first-floor window was sentenced Wednesday to a program for the mentally retarded, but will probably be deported to El Salvador instead. Since last month, Deputy Public Defender Marri Derby has unsuccessfully tried to block the deportation of Maria Bonilla, 22, who has an IQ of 61 and is mentally retarded.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2001 | LAURA WIDES and JESSICA GARRISON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Though she tries every few hours, Juana Paz Serrano can't get through to her 80-year-old father, who lives in San Salvador. His phone has been dead since the massive earthquake hit El Salvador on Saturday. All his daughter can think about is how her father suffers from heart trouble. "I'm so worried," the Costa Mesa woman said Sunday. "There's nothing to be done. We can only call and wait."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1986 | DAVID REYES, Times Staff Writer
Since Friday, Maria A. Rivas and her daughter, Judith, have spent hours trying to telephone relatives in El Salvador. "We haven't been able to reach anyone yet," Maria Rivas said Monday. "We still don't know anything." At least 20 times an hour, they dial the phone but each time they only get a short message from an international operator advising them that the lines are dead.
NEWS
October 31, 1991 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gloria Arqueta, a Los Angeles high school student who has lived here illegally for three years, has virtually no memory of her native El Salvador except for her parents' nightmarish stories. For many of her 17 years, she and her family wandered through Central America, searching for a safe haven from the civil war that has ravaged their country. "I just hear that children are being killed, burned to death, and they don't know why," she said. "I won't go back."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1991 | BOB ELSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Efforts by a coalition to persuade illegal Salvadoran immigrants to register for temporary residency before the Thursday deadline are being crippled by distrust and fear of government bureaucracy, officials said Friday. About 40,000 of an estimated 48,000 eligible Salvadoran immigrants in the county have not registered for protection, according to Lilia Powell, director of the Orange County Coalition for Immigrants Rights and Responsibilities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1991 | MARIA NEWMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I had a home, but I left it because of the trouble," Ricardo said. "When I returned to the home with my family, we found it had been destroyed, erased during fighting between guerrillas and the army." Like many of the 800,000 Salvadorans in the United States--with as many as 70,000 in Orange County--Ricardo fled his country because a 10-year-old civil war had made it impossible for his family to stay in one place and make a living.
NEWS
November 18, 1989 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Fernando Jacob, a recent emigre from El Salvador, walked into a popular Salvadoran restaurant and meeting place Friday afternoon, he wanted a lot more than lunch. The 34-year-old Santa Ana resident was looking for fellow countrymen to talk about the violence in their war-torn country and to curse the hundreds of miles between them and loved ones back home.
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