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Salvadorans Southern California

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2000 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Their war-torn country bears the name of the Savior, El Salvador. For the more than 700,000 Salvadorans in Southern California, the sacred image of Jesus Christ, Divine Savior of the World, standing with outstretched arms, has served as a patron saint for their country. It was he, the immigrants say, who helped them escape the bloodshed of civil war and settle in the United States.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2001 | LAURA WIDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As local aid workers began relief efforts, Salvadorans in Southern California scrambled Sunday to find out whether relatives survived a massive earthquake that struck the Central American country Saturday. Organizers of the relief effort stressed the need to avoid the mistakes after Hurricane Mitch, which hit Central America in 1998, when thousands of donated items never made it to those in need. The 7.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2001 | LAURA WIDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As local aid workers began relief efforts, Salvadorans in Southern California scrambled Sunday to find out whether relatives survived a massive earthquake that struck the Central American country Saturday. Organizers of the relief effort stressed the need to avoid the mistakes after Hurricane Mitch, which hit Central America in 1998, when thousands of donated items never made it to those in need. The 7.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2000 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Their war-torn country bears the name of the Savior, El Salvador. For the more than 700,000 Salvadorans in Southern California, the sacred image of Jesus Christ, Divine Savior of the World, standing with outstretched arms, has served as a patron saint for their country. It was he, the immigrants say, who helped them escape the bloodshed of civil war and settle in the United States.
NEWS
February 12, 1989 | HECTOR TOBAR, Times Staff Writer
First as a soldier and then as a police officer in his native El Salvador, Jose Galdamez fought proudly to defend the U.S.-backed government against people he still calls "leftist subversives and delinquents." But when the 34-year-old army veteran arrived in Southern California in 1987, he found himself looking for work on a Glendale street corner alongside exiled Salvadoran revolutionaries and activists--the same "delinquents" he had once relentlessly pursued.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1989 | HECTOR TOBAR and H. G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A Los Angeles businessman with close ties to the right-wing Republican Nationalist Alliance party in El Salvador has been named by Los Angeles police as a suspect in a series of "death squad" threats against Salvadoran refugees and Catholic priests in Southern California. The suspect, Carlos Rene Mata, 35, is the owner of Pipil Express, an international overnight delivery firm with more than 80 offices in California, New York, El Salvador and Guatemala.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1989 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A coalition of Salvadoran refugee groups called Thursday for a boycott of a Los Angeles-based international overnight delivery firm owned by Carlos Rene Mata, a businessman named by Los Angeles police as a suspect in "death squad" threats against Salvadoran refugees living in Southern California. Mata's business, Pipil Express, has 80 offices in El Salvador, Guatemala and California, including six in Los Angeles.
NEWS
October 30, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Barely an hour into his day's tedious work, Esteban Reyes had sewn buttonholes in the waistbands of 60 pairs of trousers when federal immigration agents stormed the red-brick garment factory south of downtown. As the agents moved swiftly among workers, Reyes nervously protested that he was from El Salvador. Still, the blond, blue-coated agent was skeptical and ordered Reyes' detention.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2007 | Tami Abdollah, Times Staff Writer
Thousands of Hondurans, Nicaraguans and Salvadorans in Southern California and across the United States who are here under temporary protected status have been granted an 18-month extension, officials said. Hondurans and Nicaraguans who received protected status after Hurricane Mitch devastated their countries with floods and mudslides in 1998 were due to return home after July 5.
SPORTS
June 11, 1991 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although Honduran officials continue to support an allegation by one of their players that he was offered money to ensure that his team lose a game, they said Monday that they have not filed an official complaint and will not attend a hearing scheduled for Thursday at headquarters of the Confederation of North and Central American and Caribbean soccer federations (CONCACAF).
NEWS
October 30, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Barely an hour into his day's tedious work, Esteban Reyes had sewn buttonholes in the waistbands of 60 pairs of trousers when federal immigration agents stormed the red-brick garment factory south of downtown. As the agents moved swiftly among workers, Reyes nervously protested that he was from El Salvador. Still, the blond, blue-coated agent was skeptical and ordered Reyes' detention.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1989 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A coalition of Salvadoran refugee groups called Thursday for a boycott of a Los Angeles-based international overnight delivery firm owned by Carlos Rene Mata, a businessman named by Los Angeles police as a suspect in "death squad" threats against Salvadoran refugees living in Southern California. Mata's business, Pipil Express, has 80 offices in El Salvador, Guatemala and California, including six in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1989 | HECTOR TOBAR and H. G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A Los Angeles businessman with close ties to the right-wing Republican Nationalist Alliance party in El Salvador has been named by Los Angeles police as a suspect in a series of "death squad" threats against Salvadoran refugees and Catholic priests in Southern California. The suspect, Carlos Rene Mata, 35, is the owner of Pipil Express, an international overnight delivery firm with more than 80 offices in California, New York, El Salvador and Guatemala.
NEWS
February 12, 1989 | HECTOR TOBAR, Times Staff Writer
First as a soldier and then as a police officer in his native El Salvador, Jose Galdamez fought proudly to defend the U.S.-backed government against people he still calls "leftist subversives and delinquents." But when the 34-year-old army veteran arrived in Southern California in 1987, he found himself looking for work on a Glendale street corner alongside exiled Salvadoran revolutionaries and activists--the same "delinquents" he had once relentlessly pursued.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2001 | ANTONIO OLIVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the earthquake death toll in Central America neared 700 Tuesday, community leaders and worried expatriates from El Salvador scrambled to learn more about the devastation back home while calling for extra help from the United States. This time, they said, efforts at finding quick aid should be more sophisticated than in 1998, when relief headaches made it difficult to help thousands affected by Hurricane Mitch.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1987 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
A Salvadoran woman refugee who had been kidnaped and tortured in El Salvador in 1979 received a death squad-style threat in her Los Angeles mailbox that also threatened 18 other immigrants, it was disclosed Monday.
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