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NEWS
January 28, 1996 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After scores of anonymous towns on a pockmarked coastal highway, the entrance to this spot is unmistakable: Cars turn off the pitted federal road and glide over a patterned brick avenue that could be a country club drive, past a high red-white-and-blue sign that reads--in English--"Welcome to Intipuca City." The street, with curbs and gutters, leads to a community of freshly painted concrete-block houses, many two stories high.
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NEWS
January 28, 1996 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After scores of anonymous towns on a pockmarked coastal highway, the entrance to this spot is unmistakable: Cars turn off the pitted federal road and glide over a patterned brick avenue that could be a country club drive, past a high red-white-and-blue sign that reads--in English--"Welcome to Intipuca City." The street, with curbs and gutters, leads to a community of freshly painted concrete-block houses, many two stories high.
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NEWS
December 2, 1994 | PAUL RICHTER and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Clinton Administration is expected to announce today that it will end a special refugee program for Salvadoran immigrants, but will use procedures that make it unlikely any would be deported for at least two years--and perhaps far longer, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1995 | PATRICK McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost 200,000 Salvadoran immigrants, a third of them in Southern California, began receiving long-anticipated notices from the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service this week. The message: Apply for political asylum soon or face possible deportation. In a significant concession, the INS notices extended the asylum application deadline until Jan. 31, 1996, almost six months away, instead of three months hence, which had been expected. But most eligible Salvadorans face a Sept.
NEWS
May 24, 1991 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of protests from immigrant rights groups, the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service on Wednesday instituted a substantial fee reduction for a program granting Salvadoran refugees up to 18 months of temporary haven in the United States. Since it started in January, advocacy groups across the nation have criticized the INS for charging prohibitively high fees for the program, thus denying many refugees the chance to legally live and work in this country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1991 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Encouraged by a recent loosening of procedures by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, a rush of Salvadoran refugees are applying for a unique program allowing them to temporarily live and work in the United States. With less than two weeks left before the June 30 application deadline, immigrants rights groups in Los Angeles say they are handling several thousand applications a week, compared with less than 100 a week three months ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1995 | PATRICK McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost 200,000 Salvadoran immigrants, a third of them in Southern California, began receiving long-anticipated notices from the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service this week. The message: Apply for political asylum soon or face possible deportation. In a significant concession, the INS notices extended the asylum application deadline until Jan. 31, 1996, almost six months away, instead of three months hence, which had been expected. But most eligible Salvadorans face a Sept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1991
The Immigration and Naturalization Service on Wednesday urged Salvadorans living in the United States to take advantage of a new program that allows eligible Salvadorans to live and work legally in this country for 18 months. The program, called Temporary Protected Status, went into effect Wednesday. It was part of landmark immigration legislation signed by President Bush late last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1994 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They came as waves of refugees fleeing warfare, most anticipating a short stay until the violence subsided. But eventually, the vast majority settled down and adapted to life in the United States, abandoning hopes of ever moving back to their ravaged homeland.
NEWS
June 26, 1991 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House voted Tuesday to extend by four months the deadline for Salvadoran immigrants to apply for temporary political asylum, a move that supporters say will attract up to 50,000 residents from the war-torn country in search of safe haven in the United States. The legislation extends the deadline from June 30 to Oct. 31, for Salvadorans already living in the United States to apply for the protected status visa and to receive temporary work authorization.
NEWS
January 8, 1995
Immigration and Naturalization Service officials want to make sure that employers know that Salvadorans working under an asylum program have permission to work until Sept. 30. The Deferred Enforced Departure program, which granted temporary asylum to Salvadorans, ended last month, said INS spokesman Rico Cabrera. The program was canceled because the political and human rights situations in El Salvador have improved.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1994 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They came as waves of refugees fleeing warfare, most anticipating a short stay until the violence subsided. But eventually, the vast majority settled down and adapted to life in the United States, abandoning hopes of ever moving back to their ravaged homeland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1994 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL and H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The future took an uncertain turn Friday for Elena Subialdea and other Salvadoran expatriates in Orange County, when U.S. immigration officials announced the lifting of special deferments from deportation for El Salvador nationals at the end of the month. Like others who heard the news from a radio broadcast or friend, Subialdea reacted with shock and confusion.
NEWS
December 2, 1994 | PAUL RICHTER and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Clinton Administration is expected to announce today that it will end a special refugee program for Salvadoran immigrants, but will use procedures that make it unlikely any would be deported for at least two years--and perhaps far longer, officials said.
NEWS
December 1, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The streets of this tiny village are paved with dollars from Los Angeles and other U.S. cities where Salvadorans live, work and prop up their home country's economy. Most houses have tiled floors, iron gates and fresh coats of pastel paint. There is an ambulance. The children wear shoes and ride bicycles, and the church was built with money sent from some of the estimated 1 million Salvadorans who fled the country during 12 years of civil war and now reside in the United States.
NEWS
November 15, 1994 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Already unsettled by Proposition 187, Southern California's huge Salvadoran exile community is bracing for another possible blow: next month's scheduled expiration of a program that has allowed tens of thousands of Salvadoran immigrants to remain in the United States legally for years. While most experts agree that large-scale deportations are unlikely, rumors of such extreme action have sent a shudder through Salvadoran expatriate neighborhoods from Los Angeles to Washington, D.C.
NEWS
April 5, 1991 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal program granting temporary haven to thousands of Salvadoran refugees has drawn a dismal response in Los Angeles largely because of high registration fees and a fear among immigrants that they could risk deportation by applying, immigrant rights advocates say. Since the program began in January, 5,200 people have registered with the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1991 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of protests from immigrant rights groups, the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service on Wednesday instituted a substantial fee reduction for a program granting Salvadoran refugees up to 18 months of temporary haven in the United States. Since it started in January, advocacy groups across the nation have criticized the INS for charging prohibitively high fees for the program, thus denying many refugees the chance to legally live and work in this country.
NEWS
May 18, 1993 | MATT MARSHALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As many as 500,000 Salvadoran refugees are living in legal limbo as the Clinton Administration considers whether to extend their temporary amnesty beyond the June 30 date set by the George Bush Administration. The refugees, who fled to the United States during the 1980s to escape civil war in El Salvador, are requesting the extension to see whether elections scheduled for March, 1994, will bring peace stable enough for them to return to their homeland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1993 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although El Salvador's bloody civil war is over, mass deportations of Salvadorans in the United States would undermine a delicate peace and subject returning expatriates to hardship and danger, activists said Tuesday. Activists--including two Los Angeles-area congressional representatives and an official of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles--delivered their message during a news conference outside the federal building in downtown Los Angeles.
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