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Salvage Operations

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1991 | PAUL PAYNE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A commercial fishing boat that ran aground in a midnight fog early Wednesday in Oxnard was destroyed in the surf after salvage companies decided against trying to save it, partly because they feared they might get sued for their trouble. The 40-foot boat and its crew of three Vietnamese-speaking fishermen were returning to Ventura Harbor from a seven-day trip to Santa Rosa Island. Its captain apparently became disoriented in the thick fog and landed on McGrath State Beach instead, a U.S.
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NATIONAL
April 19, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal judge in Tampa has denied a bid by deep-sea explorers to keep secret the details of a 19th century shipwreck that has yielded $500 million in treasure. U.S. Magistrate Judge Mark Pizzo threw out Odyssey Marine Exploration's request to keep information, including the identity of the ship, sealed as the company argues with Spain over ownership of the 17 tons of silver coins and other artifacts retrieved last year. The company followed with a news release announcing that the shipwreck was probably the Nuestra Senora de las Mercedes y las Animas, a Spanish galleon that sank in the Atlantic Ocean southwest of Portugal in 1804.
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NEWS
May 5, 1991 | From Associated Press
Discovery's astronauts succeeded in getting data from three scientific instruments to the ground Saturday after splicing wires and rearranging cables in a 97-step salvage operation. It was a desperate, final attempt to retrieve information from the instruments, which became virtually useless after their data recorders failed shortly after launching a week ago. Controllers now hope to obtain about half of what the investigators initially sought in what remains of the flight.
NATIONAL
August 29, 2007
Brad guy, an architect and researcher at Pennsylvania State University, is an advocate of deconstruction -- not the thorny literary theory, but the idea of carefully taking apart buildings and making the parts available to builders. The idea, Guy says, "is as old as buildings -- the Romans built on the ruins of the Egyptians."
NEWS
June 16, 1991 | ROBIN ABCARIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is the astonishing story of Victorio Peak, a minor mountain with major history in the sandy southern deserts of New Mexico. Under its rocky and road-scarred topsoil lies one of two things: either a king's ransom in hidden gold bars--upwards of $2 billion, maybe--or the dusky nothingness of empty limestone caverns.
NEWS
August 26, 1985 | United Press International
Salvage operations began off Cape Cod on Sunday to raise a sunken trawler still holding 70 to 100 bales of marijuana, after divers removed up to $15 million worth of the drug, Coast Guard officials said. Authorities believe the 60-foot vessel, which was discovered by fishermen Wednesday, was scuttled when the smugglers ran into trouble.
NEWS
March 31, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Senate has tentatively approved a plan to exempt some national forest logging from environmental laws in an effort to ease fire threats and harvest dying trees. The proposal by Sen. Slade Gorton (R-Wash.) would insulate the logging from legal challenges under the Endangered Species Act and other laws. The House has approved a similar measure, although President Clinton has indicated he opposes the idea. Critics say salvage operations actually increase fire threats.
NEWS
February 3, 1988 | United Press International
Divers will try to salvage a sunken barge laden with 300,000 gallons of fuel by lifting it off the sea bed with a crane, turning it right side up underwater, and pumping out the fuel so the vessel can be refloated, the Coast Guard said Tuesday. Authorities said salvage operations would begin today when a derrick barge arrives, and the operation will take several days to complete.
NEWS
July 30, 1992 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An international airplane recovery group known for its exhaustive yet controversial search for a piece of Amelia Earhart's airplane is poised to study the plane wrecks in Ventura County's Los Padres National Forest for historical significance. Officials of the U. S.
NEWS
November 19, 1993 | From Associated Press
Most of the $21 million in treasure from a ship that sank in 1857 was awarded Thursday to the salvagers who spent $30 million to find it. The judge said he wished it was worth more. "What a pity it did not amount to a billion dollars so that a proper award could have been given," U.S. District Judge Richard B. Kellam wrote in a decision giving 90% of the gold to the Columbus-America Discovery Group. The rest will go to the original insurers of the cargo.
WORLD
July 13, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The Spanish Civil Guard heightened a battle over a $500-million treasure of gold and silver coins from a shipwreck when it seized a vessel belonging to a Tampa, Fla.-based company. The Ocean Alert was seized three miles off the southeastern coast. The Civil Guard acted on an order of a Spanish judge who in June instructed police to seize two vessels of Odyssey Marine Exploration if they left the British colony of Gibraltar and entered Spanish waters.
NATIONAL
November 12, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The Navy is coming to the rescue of one of its mightiest veterans, joining the operation to free the World War II aircraft carrier Intrepid from deep Hudson River mud that has blocked efforts to move the ship to a dry dock for renovation. The ship, which serves as the Intrepid Sea Air & Space Museum, was moved only a few feet before its 16-foot propellers snagged in the sediment. The Navy will provide salvage support at a cost of about $3 million.
NATIONAL
October 17, 2006 | Bettina Boxall, Times Staff Writer
Three government SUVs guarded a road to nowhere. Nearby, a middle-age couple camping out in a trailer manned a round-the-clock checkpoint next to a locked gate, on the watch for environmental protesters. A few miles beyond, the drone of chain saws rose from a deep ravine while a hovering helicopter plucked blackened logs from the floor of the burned forest and carried them to the nearest road.
NATIONAL
August 1, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
A member of a salvage team examining an abandoned ship drifting in the Aleutian Islands slipped down the ship's deck and suffered a fatal blow to his head, the Coast Guard said. The team was preparing to leave the Cougar Ace, which is listing almost on its side, when the naval architect lost his footing. His name was not released. The Japanese-owned ship carries about 5,000 cars. Its crew members were rescued July 24.
NATIONAL
May 25, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Researchers raised another cannon from an underwater site two miles offshore. They hope it will help prove the sunken wreckage was once the flagship of the notorious pirate Blackbeard. "We knew it the first day, and we still have absolutely no doubt that she's the Queen Anne's Revenge," said Phil Masters, whose Florida-based research firm located the wreckage in 1996. "There is no other ship lost at Beaufort Inlet with anything more than 10 cannon."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2005 | Daryl Kelley and Spencer Weiner, Times Staff Writers
On a drizzly dawn after a sandbar scuttled the Irving Johnson outside an Oxnard harbor, a crew that had stayed with the beached tall ship overnight, and one that had arrived to help save it, huddled for an emotional group hug Tuesday morning. "The Irving Johnson has got to float again: I've got a lot of myself in that boat," said Marann Fengler, watching from Silver Strand Beach as the ship bobbed sideways in the surf near a rock jetty.
NEWS
June 5, 1998 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Fifty-six years after the carrier Yorktown sank in the battle of Midway--at a turning point of World War II--researchers Thursday released the first photograph of the wreckage three miles down on the Pacific Ocean floor. A team of National Geographic researchers working with a San Diego-based U.S.
NEWS
October 19, 1987 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Staff Writer
Against the black and gray backdrop of a forest ravaged by fire, wildlife biologist Tom Beck watched intently as the helicopter lifted from the Tarmac and veered toward the barren mountains with its load of grass seed. The pilot's mission was to aerially sow the seed over 2,475 acres of Jawbone Ridge in the Stanislaus National Forest, located near Yosemite National Park.
NATIONAL
February 26, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The lower Mississippi River was partially reopened to heavy ships after salvage crews moved a sunken vessel that had been blocking the river's only deep opening into the Gulf of Mexico. Traffic was restricted to one direction at a time and the Coast Guard kept ships moving through the channel at least two miles apart, Coast Guard Capt. Ron Branch said. There were 69 ships waiting in the Gulf of Mexico to head upriver, and 47 vessels on the river waiting to head into the gulf.
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