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Salvatore Pisello

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1989
A federal appeals court Thursday upheld the conviction of Salvatore Pisello, a reputed organized crime figure convicted of failing to pay taxes on more than $300,000 he earned from a series of business deals with MCA Records and Sugar Hill Records. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in Los Angeles said the evidence justified the conviction on two counts of tax evasion and also concluded that Pisello had not been unfairly required to prove his contention that the money had been a loan.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1989
A federal appeals court Thursday upheld the conviction of Salvatore Pisello, a reputed organized crime figure convicted of failing to pay taxes on more than $300,000 he earned from a series of business deals with MCA Records and Sugar Hill Records. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in Los Angeles said the evidence justified the conviction on two counts of tax evasion and also concluded that Pisello had not been unfairly required to prove his contention that the money had been a loan.
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BUSINESS
May 4, 1986 | Wm K. KNOEDELSEDER Jr., Times Staff Writer
Since moving to Los Angeles from New York in the early 1970s, Salvatore Pisello has lived the good life. As a restaurateur, food importer-exporter, record business wheeler-dealer and international jet-setter, he stayed at the best hotels, ate at the best restaurants, shopped at the swankiest Beverly Hills stores, wore the most expensive clothes and jewelry, drove the fanciest cars, dated the flashiest young women and always carried a big wad of cash.
BUSINESS
May 4, 1986 | Wm K. KNOEDELSEDER Jr., Times Staff Writer
Since moving to Los Angeles from New York in the early 1970s, Salvatore Pisello has lived the good life. As a restaurateur, food importer-exporter, record business wheeler-dealer and international jet-setter, he stayed at the best hotels, ate at the best restaurants, shopped at the swankiest Beverly Hills stores, wore the most expensive clothes and jewelry, drove the fanciest cars, dated the flashiest young women and always carried a big wad of cash.
BUSINESS
July 14, 1987
In a hearing before U.S. District Judge William J. Rea, reputed organized crime figure Salvatore Pisello pleaded not guilty to three counts of income tax evasion. Bail was set at $50,000, with a jury trial set for Sept. 29.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1989
Reputed organized crime figure Salvatore Pisello, sentenced to four in years in prison for evading taxes on more than $300,000 in income he earned through a series of business deals with MCA Records, surrendered to the U.S. marshal in Los Angeles on Tuesday. Pisello's attorney, Stephen Rawson, had asked U.S. District Judge William J. Rea to allow Pisello to remain free for a few weeks until federal authorities assigned Pisello to a specific prison.
BUSINESS
May 3, 1986 | Wm. KNOEDELSEDER Jr., Times Staff Writer
A U.S. judge Friday ordered reputed organized crime figure Salvatore Pisello to surrender May 23 to begin serving a two-year prison sentence for tax evasion. Pisello was sentenced in April, 1985, but has been free since May, 1985, on $15,000 bail pending his appeal, which was rejected by an appeals court April 10. In setting a voluntary surrender date, U.S. District Judge Harry L. Hupp turned down a request by prosecutors that Pisello be jailed immediately as a potential fugitive.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1988 | WILLIAM K. KNOEDELSEDER Jr., Times Staff Writer
Morris Levy, president of New York-based Roulette Records and a longtime behind-the-scenes power in the music business, was found guilty Wednesday of conspiring to extort a Philadelphia-area record distributor in the 1984 purchase of nearly 5 million so-called cutout, or discontinued, recordings from MCA Records. Convicted along with Levy in U.S. District Court in Camden, N.J.
BUSINESS
October 29, 1988 | WILLIAM K. KNOEDELSEDER Jr., Times Staff Writer
Morris Levy--longtime president of New York-based Roulette Records and one of the most colorful and influential figures in the U.S. record industry--was sentenced to 10 years in prison Friday and fined $200,000 for conspiring to extort a customer in the 1984 purchase of more than 4 million so-called cutouts, or discontinued recordings, from MCA Records. The sentence was handed down by U.S. District Judge Stanley S. Brotman in Camden, N.J.
BUSINESS
July 22, 1987 | WILLIAM K. KNOEDELSEDER JR., Times Staff Writer
An often-bitter, 16-month legal battle between MCA Records and a distributor of budget records ended Tuesday, when a U.S. District Court jury in Los Angeles ruled that MCA was not responsible for losses suffered by Scorpio Music as a result of a 1984 purchase of so-called cutout recordings from MCA. "We feel it was a just verdict, well supported by the facts," said Dennis Kinnaird, a lawyer with the firm of Munger, Tolles & Olson, which represented MCA.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1988 | Wm. KNOEDELSEDER Jr., Times Staff Writer and
The tax evasion trial of reputed organized crime figure Salvatore Pisello began Tuesday in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles with the government prosecutor claiming that Pisello evaded taxes on about $450,000 in unreported income for the years 1983 to 1985. In his opening argument, Marvin L.
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