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Salvatore R Martoche

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BUSINESS
March 21, 1990 | From United Press International
Salvatore R. Martoche, acting head of the Office of Thrift Supervision, reassigned two top executives on Tuesday, including one who played a prominent role in the handling of Lincoln Savings & Loan Assn., based in Irvine. Martoche, appointed by President Bush two weeks ago to temporarily fill the vacancy created by the resignation of M.
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BUSINESS
March 22, 1990 | JAMES BATES and ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A federal judge ruled Wednesday that federal regulators lack constitutional authority to seize an ailing Illinois savings and loan, throwing into disarray the nation's already troubled thrift bailout program. U.S. District Judge Royce C. Lamberth in Washington agreed with Olympic Federal Savings & Loan of Berwyn, Ill., that the 7-month-old U.S. Office of Thrift Supervision lacks authority to seize the thrift because its previous director, M. Danny Wall, and its current one, Salvatore R.
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BUSINESS
March 7, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Bush has named Assistant Treasury Secretary Salvatore R. Martoche as acting director of the Office of Thrift Supervision, the agency that regulates the nation's savings and loan institutions. Martoche promised to "provide stability and leadership" to the government's oversight of the troubled S&L industry. The interim appointment fills the vacancy created by the resignation last December of M.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1990 | From United Press International
Salvatore R. Martoche, acting head of the Office of Thrift Supervision, reassigned two top executives on Tuesday, including one who played a prominent role in the handling of Lincoln Savings & Loan Assn., based in Irvine. Martoche, appointed by President Bush two weeks ago to temporarily fill the vacancy created by the resignation of M.
BUSINESS
March 22, 1990 | JAMES BATES and ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A federal judge ruled Wednesday that federal regulators lack constitutional authority to seize an ailing Illinois savings and loan, throwing into disarray the nation's already troubled thrift bailout program. U.S. District Judge Royce C. Lamberth in Washington agreed with Olympic Federal Savings & Loan of Berwyn, Ill., that the 7-month-old U.S. Office of Thrift Supervision lacks authority to seize the thrift because its previous director, M. Danny Wall, and its current one, Salvatore R.
BUSINESS
March 20, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Salvatore R. Martoche, acting head of the Office of Thrift Supervision, today consolidated the agency's supervisory functions and reassigned two top executives, including one who played a prominent role in handling regulation of Lincoln Savings & Loan Assn. Martoche, appointed by President Bush two weeks ago to fill temporarily the vacancy created by the resignation of M. Danny Wall, also said the OTS has been studying the possibility of restructuring the agency's 12 district offices.
NEWS
March 23, 1990 | From Times wire services
A federal appeals court today stayed a lower court order that had blocked the government from seizing an Illinois thrift institution and threatened to derail the massive savings and loan bailout. The U.S. Court of Appeals said regulators could seize Olympic Savings and Loan Assn. of Berwyn, Ill. However, it barred the government from liquidating the thrift and selling its $1.1 billion in assets. U.S. District Judge Royce C.
NEWS
October 5, 1989 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
The Bush Administration disclosed Wednesday that it is considering ways to monitor wire transfers of large sums of money abroad by banks as part of its efforts to crack down on international money-laundering. Treasury officials said they are considering regulations that would require banks to report electronic transfers to overseas destinations from deposits made in U.S. banks totaling $10,000 or more.
NEWS
April 5, 1988 | Associated Press
After a week of frustration, Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III today announced replacements for two top Justice Department posts, following refusals earlier in the day by a Philadelphia lawyer and a Labor Department official to fill important vacancies in the department created by politically embarrassing protest resignations. Meese, who is leaving Wednesday on a weeklong trip to South America, named John Shepherd, a former president of the American Bar Assn., as deputy attorney general, the No.
NEWS
July 26, 1988 | JANE FRITSCH, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Treasury Department has decided to drop forfeiture proceedings against the Atlantis II, the nation's premier research ship, and return the vessel to the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution without a fine, a lawyer for Woods Hole said Monday. The ship was seized two months ago in the initial stages of the federal government's "zero tolerance" anti-drug crackdown after U.S. Customs Service inspectors found a trace of marijuana in a crewman's stateroom.
BUSINESS
March 7, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Bush has named Assistant Treasury Secretary Salvatore R. Martoche as acting director of the Office of Thrift Supervision, the agency that regulates the nation's savings and loan institutions. Martoche promised to "provide stability and leadership" to the government's oversight of the troubled S&L industry. The interim appointment fills the vacancy created by the resignation last December of M.
BUSINESS
April 11, 1990 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal courts have removed a troubling legal obstacle to the government's savings and loan bailout through two separate rulings involving an insolvent thrift that had challenged the government's constitutional authority to seize and close it. Meanwhile, the Justice Department announced Tuesday that the government plans to freeze and seize assets of both thrifts and their executives in cases involving fraud. Olympic Federal Savings & Loan of Berwyn, Ill.
BUSINESS
April 8, 1990 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trish!" a dapper Charles H. Keating Jr. shouted out to a former employee he recognized recently at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport. A startled Patricia Johnson, the one-time aide whom he had unceremoniously fired a year earlier, looked up and saw her former boss. She shook hands with him, but not a word was spoken, not a smile flashed on either face. With the greeting made, she turned and walked away.
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