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Salvia Divinorum

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HEALTH
April 28, 2008 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
It's been almost 50 years since a generation of young people were urged to "turn on and tune out" with the aid of psychedelic drugs. But at least one hallucinogenic drug remains legal and widely available -- and it's become popular with today's teenagers. The drug, an herb called Salvia divinorum, is not new. Historically, it was used by the Mazatec Indians in Oaxaca, Mexico, for religious or healing rituals.
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NEWS
December 13, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times
Salvia turned up on the pop culture radar last week after Miley Cyrus, caught on a video using a bong, said she was smoking salvia, not marijuana. So what’s the difference? Researchers at Johns Hopkins University have been looking into that very thing. Little research has been done on the effects of Salvia divinorum , an herb in the mint family that has been used as a hallucinogenic drug. As this Baltimore Sun story explains: "The study, while small and in a tightly controlled environment, appeared to show that the drug could be surprisingly intense and disorienting.
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NEWS
April 29, 2008
Salvia divinorum: An article in Monday's Health section about the hallucinogenic herb Salvia divinorum referred to a slogan for the use of psychedelic drugs as "Turn on and tune out." The slogan, coined by Timothy Leary, is "Turn on, tune in and drop out."
NEWS
December 10, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times
Miley Cyrus taking a hit off a bong? Ouch. Not exactly wholesome Disney fare. And though TMZ posted a video, it doesn’t show exactly what Cyrus may have been smoking. This Picture of Health blog post from the Baltimore Sun reports: "She says she was smoking salvia and not marijuana. That’s a hallucinogenic drug made from a plant in the mint family and it’s legal in many states, including California where the video was taken of Cyrus. " Read the rest of the post to learn what Johns Hopkins scientists say about the effects of salvia.
HEALTH
May 5, 2008
Salvia divinorum ought to at least have an accurate warning label [“Salvia: The Legal Herb,” April 28]. I would also favor an additional tax on it to help discourage heavy consumption and also to help the public police the enforcement of its sales (provided it becomes law that a person needs to be 18 or over to buy it). Stephen V. Hymowitz Los Angeles
NEWS
December 10, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times
Miley Cyrus taking a hit off a bong? Ouch. Not exactly wholesome Disney fare. And though TMZ posted a video, it doesn’t show exactly what Cyrus may have been smoking. This Picture of Health blog post from the Baltimore Sun reports: "She says she was smoking salvia and not marijuana. That’s a hallucinogenic drug made from a plant in the mint family and it’s legal in many states, including California where the video was taken of Cyrus. " Read the rest of the post to learn what Johns Hopkins scientists say about the effects of salvia.
NEWS
December 13, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times
Salvia turned up on the pop culture radar last week after Miley Cyrus, caught on a video using a bong, said she was smoking salvia, not marijuana. So what’s the difference? Researchers at Johns Hopkins University have been looking into that very thing. Little research has been done on the effects of Salvia divinorum , an herb in the mint family that has been used as a hallucinogenic drug. As this Baltimore Sun story explains: "The study, while small and in a tightly controlled environment, appeared to show that the drug could be surprisingly intense and disorienting.
NEWS
March 17, 2002 | WILL WEISSERT, ASSOCIATED PRESS
This sweltering corner of the Sierra Mazateca Mountains has seen some unusual visitors lately, thanks to a fern-like plant with thick stems and fluffy leaves. A British businessman showed up with a sack of pesos, asking to trade them for a sack of leaves. A Spanish importer offered a theater-style TV and satellite service in exchange for three seedlings. A couple from Mexico City spent four days asking questions, learning how to dry the plant's stems and extract its bitter juice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2001 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Looking like an Old West preacher, with an earnest manner and long wavy hair, an amateur botanist from Malibu takes the podium and soberly lectures a small but keenly interested audience on a hallucinogenic drug that is legal and available. This is Daniel Siebert, the local apostle of an unlikely Mexican herb called salvia divinorum, or diviner's sage.
MAGAZINE
October 19, 2003 | Emily Green, Emily Green is a Times staff writer.
The first conversation with Dale Pendell is like an overseas telephone call with a lag on the line. I speak. He listens. He thinks. Then he responds in such perfectly formed sentences that I can almost hear the commas. The stilted speech is surprising. As a writer, Pendell is so fluent that he can make a list of drug side-effects sound interesting, a feat he routinely performed in his two books. Delve deeper into his work and you find poetry, beautiful poetry.
HEALTH
May 5, 2008
Salvia divinorum ought to at least have an accurate warning label [“Salvia: The Legal Herb,” April 28]. I would also favor an additional tax on it to help discourage heavy consumption and also to help the public police the enforcement of its sales (provided it becomes law that a person needs to be 18 or over to buy it). Stephen V. Hymowitz Los Angeles
NEWS
April 29, 2008
Salvia divinorum: An article in Monday's Health section about the hallucinogenic herb Salvia divinorum referred to a slogan for the use of psychedelic drugs as "Turn on and tune out." The slogan, coined by Timothy Leary, is "Turn on, tune in and drop out."
HEALTH
April 28, 2008 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
It's been almost 50 years since a generation of young people were urged to "turn on and tune out" with the aid of psychedelic drugs. But at least one hallucinogenic drug remains legal and widely available -- and it's become popular with today's teenagers. The drug, an herb called Salvia divinorum, is not new. Historically, it was used by the Mazatec Indians in Oaxaca, Mexico, for religious or healing rituals.
NEWS
March 17, 2002 | WILL WEISSERT, ASSOCIATED PRESS
This sweltering corner of the Sierra Mazateca Mountains has seen some unusual visitors lately, thanks to a fern-like plant with thick stems and fluffy leaves. A British businessman showed up with a sack of pesos, asking to trade them for a sack of leaves. A Spanish importer offered a theater-style TV and satellite service in exchange for three seedlings. A couple from Mexico City spent four days asking questions, learning how to dry the plant's stems and extract its bitter juice.
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