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Salyer American

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BUSINESS
July 2, 1987 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
New evidence of the severity of the farm debt crisis in California surfaced Wednesday as it was learned that one of California's largest family-owned farming companies has signed over 40,000 acres of its land to Bank of America to settle most of its debt with the bank. However, Salyer American, founded in 1921 by farmer E. Clarence Salyer, will lease back the land in the central San Joaquin Valley and continue to farm and manage it along with 27,000 acres it retains.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1995
Re "2 Farm Giants End Decades of Rivalry With Land Deal," Feb. 10: Your article concerning the takeover of Salyer American by J.G. Boswell Co. was flawed. It seems that something of this nature should have been reported in the business section in a very businesslike manner. Instead it was an inaccurate portrayal of Clarence Salyer, who passed away 21 years ago. Salyer was a pioneer in California agriculture, arriving in Corcoran, California, by train in 1917 with his wife and year-old son and $100.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1995
Re "2 Farm Giants End Decades of Rivalry With Land Deal," Feb. 10: Your article concerning the takeover of Salyer American by J.G. Boswell Co. was flawed. It seems that something of this nature should have been reported in the business section in a very businesslike manner. Instead it was an inaccurate portrayal of Clarence Salyer, who passed away 21 years ago. Salyer was a pioneer in California agriculture, arriving in Corcoran, California, by train in 1917 with his wife and year-old son and $100.
BUSINESS
July 2, 1987 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
New evidence of the severity of the farm debt crisis in California surfaced Wednesday as it was learned that one of California's largest family-owned farming companies has signed over 40,000 acres of its land to Bank of America to settle most of its debt with the bank. However, Salyer American, founded in 1921 by farmer E. Clarence Salyer, will lease back the land in the central San Joaquin Valley and continue to farm and manage it along with 27,000 acres it retains.
BUSINESS
June 17, 2010 | By P.J. Huffstutter, Los Angeles Times
Scott Salyer stepped into the federal courtroom in Sacramento, his trim frame swimming in an orange prisoner jumpsuit, his legs shackled, his wrists restrained. It was a humiliating moment in February for the 54-year-old agribusiness mogul, the last prince of one of California's cotton farming dynasties. The tomato processing outfit he started with his father, Fred Salyer, was in bankruptcy. Scott was being blamed for running SK Foods into the ground — and far worse. Salyer clenched his jaw as the prosecutor reeled off the allegations: that he and SK Foods tricked supermarkets and big food companies into buying substandard tomato products to put into brands found in almost every American cupboard.
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