Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSam Arkoff
IN THE NEWS

Sam Arkoff

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2009 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
In Hollywood, the more things change, the more they remain the same. When I was a clueless cub reporter, I did a story on Sam Arkoff, the B-movie impresario behind the fabled American International Pictures, the low-budget assembly line (known as AIP) that churned out hundreds of quickie teen exploitation beach party and horror films. In his office, Arkoff had movie posters adorned with catchy titles and ad slogans.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2009 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
In Hollywood, the more things change, the more they remain the same. When I was a clueless cub reporter, I did a story on Sam Arkoff, the B-movie impresario behind the fabled American International Pictures, the low-budget assembly line (known as AIP) that churned out hundreds of quickie teen exploitation beach party and horror films. In his office, Arkoff had movie posters adorned with catchy titles and ad slogans.
Advertisement
BOOKS
July 12, 1992 | Kenneth Turan, Turan is The Times' film critic.
Shlock was so much simpler when Sam Arkoff was king of the hill. If you needed oozing blood, you used chocolate syrup. If you wanted a quick script, you asked your brother-in-law. If, as in the case of something called "The Beast With 1,000,000 Eyes!," your director ran out of money before managing to shoot the monster footage, you put 40 holes in a teakettle, ran steam through it and laughed all the way to the bank.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1998 | Patrick Goldstein, Patrick Goldstein is a Times staff writer
Even before Sam Arkoff had thumbed through the Hollywood trade papers and a faxed report on the weekend box-office results, as is his custom each Monday morning, he was already convinced that one new movie would be a sure-fire flop. Titled "Suicide Kings," the film is a low-budget kidnapping thriller--but it wasn't the subject that concerned Arkoff. It was the film's title.
BOOKS
August 9, 1992
Kenneth Turan's review of "Flying Through Hollywood by the Seat of My Pants" was unusually valuable because he caught and reflected the unique character of Sam Arkoff, which I have observed for 22 years while helping publicize him. What has never been pointed out by anyone, to my knowledge, is that Mr. Arkoff and about six other producers who have influenced moviemaking in the past half century have been known as people as much as for...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1998 | Patrick Goldstein, Patrick Goldstein is a Times staff writer
Even before Sam Arkoff had thumbed through the Hollywood trade papers and a faxed report on the weekend box-office results, as is his custom each Monday morning, he was already convinced that one new movie would be a sure-fire flop. Titled "Suicide Kings," the film is a low-budget kidnapping thriller--but it wasn't the subject that concerned Arkoff. It was the film's title.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1993 | SUSAN KING, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
'50s Classics for the '90s: A new partnership called Drive-In Classics Theater plans to produce '90s versions of 10 "troubled teen" flicks from the '50s as a cable anthology series for Showtime. Among the titles to be remade are "Rock All Night," to be directed by Quentin Tarantino ("Reservoir Dogs"), and "Dragstrip Girl," directed by Mary Lambert ("Pet Semetary").
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1989
. . . How concerned is Warner Bros. about potential piracy of its "Batman" video due out Nov. 15? The studio had a special security guard posted outside the door where the video transfer was done to protect precious master tapes. A spokesman for Warners Home Video called the extra security "unusual--I can't, in recent memory, recall an occasion where it was done before." . . . Legendary bootlegger George (Machine Gun) Kelly is the subject of competing film projects--one from the Price Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Burt Topper, 78, who made such low-budget films as "Diary of a High School Bride" and "War Is Hell," died Tuesday of pulmonary failure at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, said his wife, Jennifer. Starting in the late 1950s, Topper wrote, directed and produced films for Sam Arkoff's American International Pictures, which was known for making movies aimed at a teen audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1996 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Peter Jones' "Ballyhoo: The Hollywood Sideshow" is as irresistible as popcorn as it calls attention to one of the film industry's most neglected aspects: the promotion of its products. Nowadays, promotion is accomplished by expensive, ultra-sophisticated media blitzes, but this one-hour documentary takes us back to the business' early connections to vaudeville and carnivals, when movies were a novelty. Jones rightly pays tribute to the first great showman, P.T.
BOOKS
August 9, 1992
Kenneth Turan's review of "Flying Through Hollywood by the Seat of My Pants" was unusually valuable because he caught and reflected the unique character of Sam Arkoff, which I have observed for 22 years while helping publicize him. What has never been pointed out by anyone, to my knowledge, is that Mr. Arkoff and about six other producers who have influenced moviemaking in the past half century have been known as people as much as for...
BOOKS
July 12, 1992 | Kenneth Turan, Turan is The Times' film critic.
Shlock was so much simpler when Sam Arkoff was king of the hill. If you needed oozing blood, you used chocolate syrup. If you wanted a quick script, you asked your brother-in-law. If, as in the case of something called "The Beast With 1,000,000 Eyes!," your director ran out of money before managing to shoot the monster footage, you put 40 holes in a teakettle, ran steam through it and laughed all the way to the bank.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|