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BUSINESS
February 10, 1998 | RUSS STANTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 20 years, the Southland's musical instrument retail business has been as relaxed as a Brahms lullaby. The Guitar Center pretty much owns the rock 'n' roll business, and about 1,000 mom-and-pop stores have neatly divided up the rest. But that serenity is about to be shattered. New York powerhouse Sam Ash Music will spend about $11 million this year to open four Southern California stores, accompanied by a big radio advertising campaign set to begin next month.
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BUSINESS
March 21, 1998 | RUSS STANTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 20 years, the Southland's musical instrument retail business has been as relaxed as a Brahms lullaby. The Guitar Center pretty much owns the rock 'n' roll business, and about 1,000 mom-and-pop stores have neatly divided up the rest. But that serenity is about to be shattered. New York powerhouse Sam Ash Music will spend about $11 million this year to open four Southern California stores, accompanied by a big radio advertising campaign set to begin today.
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BUSINESS
March 21, 1998 | RUSS STANTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 20 years, the Southland's musical instrument retail business has been as relaxed as a Brahms lullaby. The Guitar Center pretty much owns the rock 'n' roll business, and about 1,000 mom-and-pop stores have neatly divided up the rest. But that serenity is about to be shattered. New York powerhouse Sam Ash Music will spend about $11 million this year to open four Southern California stores, accompanied by a big radio advertising campaign set to begin today.
BUSINESS
February 10, 1998 | RUSS STANTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 20 years, the Southland's musical instrument retail business has been as relaxed as a Brahms lullaby. The Guitar Center pretty much owns the rock 'n' roll business, and about 1,000 mom-and-pop stores have neatly divided up the rest. But that serenity is about to be shattered. New York powerhouse Sam Ash Music will spend about $11 million this year to open four Southern California stores, accompanied by a big radio advertising campaign set to begin next month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1999 | JUDY SILBER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Chuck Madere hasn't yet received the calls he often gets this time of year. They usually come from desperate brass or wind musicians, visiting California for the New Year's Rose Parade, whose instrument won't play right. From among the bands that choose to stay in Anaheim, someone usually drops an instrument and needs it fixed in a hurry. And with few instrument repairers in Orange County, Madere often gets the call.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2003 | Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writer
The Christmas season has left executives at Guitar Center Inc. playing a happy tune. Shares of the Westlake Village-based retailer of guitars and other music equipment soared $3.94, or 23%, to $20.80 Tuesday on Nasdaq, a day after alerting Wall Street that it was raising its fourth-quarter earnings estimate after strong holiday sales boosted quarterly revenue to a record $335 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1999 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The foundation of the Blues Brothers act was that they were on "a mission from God" to play music, but it's no act for Tennessee guitar ace Doyle Dykes. Once known as the Pickin' Preacher, Dykes has made his career sharing his "God-given gift" of music, and lately he's been working to extend his audience beyond the largely Christian music circuit he's played most of his professional life.
BUSINESS
January 30, 2004 | Debora Vrana, Times Staff Writer
Guitar Center Inc. reported a 47% increase in fourth-quarter profit Thursday driven by strong holiday sales at its retail stores as well as continued sales growth from its catalog and website. The Westlake Village-based retailer of musical instruments and recording equipment said net income rose to $19.7 million, or 78 cents a share, compared with $13.4 million, or 57 cents, in the same period last year, surpassing analysts' expectations of 72 cents a share. Sales climbed 18.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2012 | By Geoffrey Mohan, Los Angeles Times
Veteran guitar repairman Bob Wirtz faced a wall of pricey custom-built electric guitars, and he had the ear of Gibson Guitar Corp.'s resident expert on the instruments. But what Wirtz wanted to talk about was international law. Like many who attended the National Assn. of Music Merchants convention in Anaheim last weekend, Wirtz was tapping into a discordant tone among the makers, purveyors and purchasers of guitars that often are made from exotic woods protected by the federal Lacey Act. A raid on Gibson's Nashville factory last summer, the second at company workshops in as many years, vaulted the once obscure law into the national spotlight when Chief Executive Henry E. Juszkiewicz accused the federal government of "bullying" and "persecution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1999 | D.B. YOUNG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A string of bad news has hammered Guitar Center Inc. on Wall Street lately, even as some analysts and company officials insist their music superstore concept is more than just a passing tune. The first of the recent bad news came in late April, when word got out that the Agoura Hills-based seller of musical instruments would no longer distribute for Gibson Musical Instruments, a name practically synonymous with electric guitars.
BUSINESS
March 14, 1997 | JILL LEOVY and DEBORA VRANA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
No longer just a Hollywood landmark, Guitar Center--the nation's largest retailer of rock 'n' roll instruments--is taking its 33-year-old show on the road in an attempt to become the Office Depot of music stores. With plans for an aggressive nationwide expansion, the Agoura Hills guitar retailer--whose flagship store on Sunset Boulevard is a tourist magnet--will offer stock to the public for the first time.
NEWS
May 5, 2002 | MARTHA IRVINE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Back in high school, the only people Jean Kahler knew who played guitar were guys. They weren't very good, she says, but they were their own little club. Then, sometime in college, "there started to be a cool girlie guitar thing," says Kahler, a 23-year-old Chicagoan who started guitar lessons two years ago. Now, an instrument once associated with such male rock pioneers as Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton and Carlos Santana is getting lots of interest from young women and girls.
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