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Sam Beam

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January 24, 2011 | By Chris Martins, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It was a rainy day in Austin, Texas, and somebody's hair just got pulled. As Sam Beam, 36, spoke into the phone, there was a rustling on his side of the line, a couple of giggles and a small scream. "Guys," he pleaded to his daughters, "I'm trying to talk here. " He returned to the conversation with a warm chuckle. "Man, they're crazy today. Wrestling! What was I talking about?" Beam, otherwise known as esteemed folk auteur Iron & Wine, is married with five girls, ages 9 months to 12 years, and is a self-professed homebody.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Those looking for a shot of spirit for a holiday less than two weeks away would be advised to take a few minutes. It'll serve you well to see this version of a classic that a collection of musicians -- including Iron & Wine, Calexico, Glen Hansard and Kathleen Edwards -- so beautifully performed on "Late Night with Jimmy Fallon" on Wednesday.  "Fairytale of New York," a story of bitter love and hate circa 1987 by the Irish band the...
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2007 | August Brown
Iron & WINE'S Sam Beam is an unlikely rock star, but he makes an even more unlikely pan-ethnic world music experimentalist. Beam, whose name rarely appears in print without the words "beard," "folkie" or " 'Garden State' soundtrack" nearby, has always been a more devious writer and arranger than most fans give him credit for. Early albums of his crackly, intimate fingerpicking were tense with images of love as a tentative escape from Southern poverty, racism and myth.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
AUSTIN, Texas -- At South by Southwest, most musicians don't get the luxury of privacy during soundchecks. Preparing for their set early Thursday afternoon at a Pitchfork showcase, the members of L.A.'s Rhye tuned up their instruments in full view of the several hundred hipsters making their way into a warehouse space east of Interstate 35. And with keyboard, bass, drums, violin, cello, trombone and vocals, the group took its time doing it too; even...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2007 | Mikael Wood, Special to The Times
Sam Beam didn't pick up an acoustic guitar Wednesday at the Orpheum until he was a dozen songs into his mesmerizing 95-minute set with Iron & Wine. For most bands, that bit of information would mean more for the roadies than for the musicians.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2011
JAZZ Slumgum The eccentric and unpredictable jazz quartet Slumgum will be providing live scores for an eclectic coupling of silent films: Man Ray's experimental cinepoem, "Emak-Bakia," and the 1924 classic "Sherlock Jr. " starring Buster Keaton. Cinefamily at the Silent Movie Theatre , 611 N. Fairfax Ave. 8 p.m. $10. http://www.cinefamily.org/. Tony Russell In the grand tradition of the swinging Las Vegas lounge acts of the 1960s, jazz funnyman Tony Russell will perform his show "You Shoulda Been There.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
Good news for fans of hushed, rustic indie folk: A new Iron and Wine album is on the way. Due out April 16, "Ghost on Ghost" will serve as the band's debut for Nonesuch Records, which with its roster of brainy, roots-oriented types -- think Laura Veirs and the Low Anthem -- certainly seems like a suitable home for Sam Beam's Texas-based outfit. Only, wait. Hold up: Judging by "Lovers' Revolution," an album track posted on YouTube on Thursday, Iron and Wine is no longer in the rustic-indie-folk business; the new song feels more like some kind of post-beatnik coffee-shop-jazz experiment, complete with jaunty piano, honking saxophone and words about the government and laughing gas. In a statement, Beam said: "Ghost on Ghost" reflects his determination to move beyond the "anxious tension" of the band's last two albums: 2011's "Kiss Each Other Clean" and 2007's "The Shepherd's Dog. " "This record felt like a reward to myself after the way I went about making the last few," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2011
BOOKS Maxine Hong Kingston The author, whose books weave myths, dreams, history and personal experiences together, will read from and discuss her work, including "I Love a Broad Margin to My Life," her unique new memoir told in verse. Andrew Lam, editor and co-founder of New America Media, will moderate. (Kingston will also appear at the Hammer Museum in Westwood on Wednesday at 7 p.m.) Central Library , 630 W. 5th St., L.A. 7 p.m. Free (reservations recommended)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Those looking for a shot of spirit for a holiday less than two weeks away would be advised to take a few minutes. It'll serve you well to see this version of a classic that a collection of musicians -- including Iron & Wine, Calexico, Glen Hansard and Kathleen Edwards -- so beautifully performed on "Late Night with Jimmy Fallon" on Wednesday.  "Fairytale of New York," a story of bitter love and hate circa 1987 by the Irish band the...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
AUSTIN, Texas -- At South by Southwest, most musicians don't get the luxury of privacy during soundchecks. Preparing for their set early Thursday afternoon at a Pitchfork showcase, the members of L.A.'s Rhye tuned up their instruments in full view of the several hundred hipsters making their way into a warehouse space east of Interstate 35. And with keyboard, bass, drums, violin, cello, trombone and vocals, the group took its time doing it too; even...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
Good news for fans of hushed, rustic indie folk: A new Iron and Wine album is on the way. Due out April 16, "Ghost on Ghost" will serve as the band's debut for Nonesuch Records, which with its roster of brainy, roots-oriented types -- think Laura Veirs and the Low Anthem -- certainly seems like a suitable home for Sam Beam's Texas-based outfit. Only, wait. Hold up: Judging by "Lovers' Revolution," an album track posted on YouTube on Thursday, Iron and Wine is no longer in the rustic-indie-folk business; the new song feels more like some kind of post-beatnik coffee-shop-jazz experiment, complete with jaunty piano, honking saxophone and words about the government and laughing gas. In a statement, Beam said: "Ghost on Ghost" reflects his determination to move beyond the "anxious tension" of the band's last two albums: 2011's "Kiss Each Other Clean" and 2007's "The Shepherd's Dog. " "This record felt like a reward to myself after the way I went about making the last few," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2011
JAZZ Slumgum The eccentric and unpredictable jazz quartet Slumgum will be providing live scores for an eclectic coupling of silent films: Man Ray's experimental cinepoem, "Emak-Bakia," and the 1924 classic "Sherlock Jr. " starring Buster Keaton. Cinefamily at the Silent Movie Theatre , 611 N. Fairfax Ave. 8 p.m. $10. http://www.cinefamily.org/. Tony Russell In the grand tradition of the swinging Las Vegas lounge acts of the 1960s, jazz funnyman Tony Russell will perform his show "You Shoulda Been There.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2011
BOOKS Maxine Hong Kingston The author, whose books weave myths, dreams, history and personal experiences together, will read from and discuss her work, including "I Love a Broad Margin to My Life," her unique new memoir told in verse. Andrew Lam, editor and co-founder of New America Media, will moderate. (Kingston will also appear at the Hammer Museum in Westwood on Wednesday at 7 p.m.) Central Library , 630 W. 5th St., L.A. 7 p.m. Free (reservations recommended)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2011 | By Chris Martins, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It was a rainy day in Austin, Texas, and somebody's hair just got pulled. As Sam Beam, 36, spoke into the phone, there was a rustling on his side of the line, a couple of giggles and a small scream. "Guys," he pleaded to his daughters, "I'm trying to talk here. " He returned to the conversation with a warm chuckle. "Man, they're crazy today. Wrestling! What was I talking about?" Beam, otherwise known as esteemed folk auteur Iron & Wine, is married with five girls, ages 9 months to 12 years, and is a self-professed homebody.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2007 | Mikael Wood, Special to The Times
Sam Beam didn't pick up an acoustic guitar Wednesday at the Orpheum until he was a dozen songs into his mesmerizing 95-minute set with Iron & Wine. For most bands, that bit of information would mean more for the roadies than for the musicians.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2007 | August Brown
Iron & WINE'S Sam Beam is an unlikely rock star, but he makes an even more unlikely pan-ethnic world music experimentalist. Beam, whose name rarely appears in print without the words "beard," "folkie" or " 'Garden State' soundtrack" nearby, has always been a more devious writer and arranger than most fans give him credit for. Early albums of his crackly, intimate fingerpicking were tense with images of love as a tentative escape from Southern poverty, racism and myth.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2004 | Natalie Nichols, Special to The Times
The hushed, subtle music of singer-songwriter Sam Beam, who records and performs under the name Iron & Wine, had a vaguely Appalachian feel at points during his sold-out Saturday show at the Knitting Factory. The artist's long, bushy beard furthered this impression, though Beam actually hails from Miami. Such unexpected surprises were part of the pleasure of hearing Beam and his quartet's hour-plus set on this first of two consecutive nights.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2003 | Steve Hochman, Special to The Times
Used to be that acts from Seattle's Sub Pop Records label tried to wake the whole world. But the three Sub Pop artists who played the Knitting Factory Hollywood on Friday sometimes seemed afraid that they might disturb the neighbors. While the label expanded beyond its grunge roots years ago, it was still odd to see its name on a night so hushed. But the connection was there in the solipsistic sadness that centered these artists' quietude as much as it did Kurt Cobain's rage.
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