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Sam Bowie

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December 12, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
Sam Bowie is probably best known for being drafted ahead of Michael Jordan in the 1984 NBA draft. Bowie was chosen by Portland with the second overall pick, one spot ahead of Jordan. Bowie broke his left leg in 1985 and had, at best, a disappointing NBA career. Jordan went on the become the greatest player in NBA history. Bowie missed two seasons at Kentucky because of leg injuries but had a strong final season. Of course, if the Trail Blazers had known the day of the draft that Bowie still had a bum leg, they never would have taken him. But who knew?
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SPORTS
December 12, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
Sam Bowie is probably best known for being drafted ahead of Michael Jordan in the 1984 NBA draft. Bowie was chosen by Portland with the second overall pick, one spot ahead of Jordan. Bowie broke his left leg in 1985 and had, at best, a disappointing NBA career. Jordan went on the become the greatest player in NBA history. Bowie missed two seasons at Kentucky because of leg injuries but had a strong final season. Of course, if the Trail Blazers had known the day of the draft that Bowie still had a bum leg, they never would have taken him. But who knew?
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SPORTS
March 20, 1990 | SCOTT HOWARD-COOPER
The center with a heart of gold and legs of chalk has cemented his future, and in something other than plaster of Paris. But knock on wood, because what has been learned from the strange odyssey of Sam Bowie is that nothing is certain except today. Tomorrow may bring another broken bone. After all, he has been in more casts than half the Screen Actors Guild. In his first four seasons as a pro, he played in 139 games and missed 319. Finally, though, Bowie is everything promised.
SPORTS
July 9, 2011 | By David Wharton
No-so-fabulous fives Not all high school phenoms and first-round draft picks achieve greatness on the big stage. The journey from rising star to superstar can be long and fraught with peril. Staff writer David Wharton looks at five examples in four major sports: Basketball LaRue Martin (1972-76): The top pick of the 1972 draft, Martin lasted four seasons with the Portland Trail Blazers, averaging 5.3 points a game. Sam Bowie (1984-95): Another Trail Blazers first-rounder had a decent career — but Portland could have picked Michael Jordan.
SPORTS
May 4, 1988 | Randy Harvey
The two most celebrated 7-foot centers whom the Portland Trail Blazers have drafted since Bill Walton may be rehabilitating from injuries together this summer. One is Sam Bowie, formerly of the University of Kentucky, who may never return to competition after suffering a broken leg last fall for the fourth time in six years. The other is Arvidas Sabonis of the Soviet Union.
SPORTS
January 24, 1988 | RICHARD HOFFER, Times Staff Writer
It's been popular to believe that this is the little team that could, except that, ever since 1977, when it last won a National Basketball Assn. championship, it's been the team that never does. Bad break (left leg) after bad break (right leg) after bad break (oh, them bones), not to mention the odd playoff swoon, have cooled Blazermania all the way down to a sizzle.
SPORTS
April 27, 1985
Most everyone agreed that Sam Bowie's most memorable move Thursday night was not one he made on the floor during the Portland Trail Blazers' temple-throbbing 115-113 victory over the Dallas Mavericks in Game 4 of their first-round playoff series.
SPORTS
November 10, 1986
Portland Trail Blazers' center Sam Bowie will undergo surgery on his right leg and probably miss the rest of the NBA season.
SPORTS
March 29, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The New Jersey Nets today announced the signing of 7-foot-1 center Sam Bowie to a five-year contract. Neither the team nor Bowie would disclose terms of the deal, but it is believed worth about $2.5 million a year.
SPORTS
December 13, 2009 | Mark Heisler
There was once a team from Portland called the Trail Blazers that was so beloved, their fans gave their adoration a name -- "Blazermania" -- and called themselves "Blazer Nation." This was so cutting edge in the 1970s, it led the way for other villages to proclaim "Fernandomania," and "Red Sox Nation." So, it wasn't just sad, but crushing, when the Blazermaniacs saw their team take an oft-injured 7-footer named Sam Bowie in the storied 1984 draft who went right on getting hurt, instead of a guard named Michael Jordan, who became the game's greatest player.
SPORTS
March 14, 2002 | Mal Florence
Gene Frenette of the Florida Times-Union on the daunting task of handicapping the NCAA basketball tournament: "There's no fail-proof method of picking which unheralded school possibly makes a Final Four run from which No. 1 seed might tank in the second round. "It's like trying to figure out between Kentucky and UCLA who gets the Jerry Springer guest spot as Dysfunctional Team of the Year. "You break it down. You analyze.
SPORTS
January 29, 2000
Regarding Elton Brand and the Chicago Bulls' rebuilding strategy, Mark Heisler [Jan. 23] says, "How many dynasties do you start around the third-best player available?" He seems to be forgetting that Michael Jordan was the "third-best" player available, after Hakeem Olajuwon and Sam Bowie. LARRY CAHILL Newport Beach
SPORTS
September 30, 1995 | Associated Press
The Lakers' Sam Bowie, who was chosen before Michael Jordan in the 1984 NBA draft, announced Friday that he was retiring after 11 injury-plagued seasons. Bowie, 34, whose Laker contract expired after last season, said he wanted to spend more time with his family. "It's something I've been looking forward to for quite some time," Bowie said. The 7-foot-1 center has been nagged by injuries since his college days at Kentucky. He averaged 10.9 points and 7.
SPORTS
April 29, 1995 | SCOTT HOWARD-COOPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The big kids on the blocks, once considered a Laker advantage but today nothing more than an empty boast, started to reclaim their pride and bodies on the day after, an act that could come only after the Seattle SuperSonics handed them their heads back.
SPORTS
December 22, 1993 | SCOTT HOWARD-COOPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Problems? What problems? The Lakers, in the middle of a skid that was leaving black marks through most of the Eastern time zone, had a clear-the-air meeting during practice Monday, then did the unthinkable Tuesday night: They scored 100 points; they outrebounded an opponent, and they beat the Orlando Magic, 109-102, as offensive specialists Sam Bowie and James Edwards played defensive stopper on Shaquille O'Neal when it counted.
SPORTS
December 14, 1993 | SCOTT HOWARD-COOPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It wasn't fair, not on a night when Sam Bowie again came through as starting center pro tem and Vlade Divac had something resembling a regular work shift for the first time in three games. Then to have it come down to a missed shot by a Laker center. If Bowie, who had made six of his previous nine shots and was instrumental in keeping the Lakers close in the fourth quarter, made the 15-footer, it would have meant a one-point lead with about three seconds to play.
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