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Sam Cohn

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2009 | Dennis McLellan
Sam Cohn, a powerful talent agent who dominated New York's talent business during his heyday, has died. He was 79. Cohn, who was at International Creative Management since its inception in 1975 and headed the New York office for nearly 25 years, died Wednesday at New York-Presbyterian Hospital after a brief illness, said family friend David Richenthal, a Broadway producer. The family did not disclose the nature of the illness.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2009 | Dennis McLellan
Sam Cohn, a powerful talent agent who dominated New York's talent business during his heyday, has died. He was 79. Cohn, who was at International Creative Management since its inception in 1975 and headed the New York office for nearly 25 years, died Wednesday at New York-Presbyterian Hospital after a brief illness, said family friend David Richenthal, a Broadway producer. The family did not disclose the nature of the illness.
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BUSINESS
July 29, 1990 | MICHAEL CIEPLY
Above the door hangs a black top hat with glittery letters that read "Broadway Sam." On the walls are the obligatory posters touting clients--Meryl Streep, Sigourney Weaver, Woody Allen, Diane Wiest, Mike Nichols, Robert Benton, Fred Schepisi, Susan Seidelman. And, in the middle of it all, sits Sam Cohn: co-founder of ICM and, by some accounts, the greatest talent agent in the world.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1990 | MICHAEL CIEPLY
Above the door hangs a black top hat with glittery letters that read "Broadway Sam." On the walls are the obligatory posters touting clients--Meryl Streep, Sigourney Weaver, Woody Allen, Diane Wiest, Mike Nichols, Robert Benton, Fred Schepisi, Susan Seidelman. And, in the middle of it all, sits Sam Cohn: co-founder of ICM and, by some accounts, the greatest talent agent in the world.
NEWS
August 9, 1987
Come on, boys, let's get our priorities straight . . . Where's Martin Lesak of Abrams Artists? He may not have the clout of a Michael Ovitz or a Sam Cohn, but there's not a better softball, switch-hitting, third baseman in town. TED COSTAS Beverly Hills
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1987 | DAVID FOX
"Well, we're doing an article on Hollywood's talent agents and we think it might be appropriate if we had some photos of the executives at your agency. . . ." That's how we began our quest for the photos you see on these pages. An innocent request, you say? Hardly. Nothing in the film business is ever so simple. The request at agency after agency--well most agencies--was met with silence or "Sorry, no comment." We called private photographers. But they said the photos weren't theirs to give out.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1987 | PAUL ROSENFIELD, Times Staff Writer
"And I'd also like to thank my closest friend, Sam Cohn." The audience at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion--and at Spago and at Elaine's in New York--was assuredly waiting for best supporting actress winner Dianne Wiest to thank the man who is one of the half-dozen most powerful agents in show business. Cohn is the freewheeling, New York-based (mostly at the Russian Tea Room) International Creative Management agent who counts.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1989 | DENNIS BROWN
Despite the current glut of movie sequels, they're hardly new. In 1939, the same year MGM distributed "Gone With the Wind," the studio also released its third "Thin Man," its second and third "Dr. Kildares," and its seventh, eighth and ninth "Andy Hardys." Yet, for half a century, "GWTW"--the most successful movie of all time, based on the most popular American novel (more than 25 million copies sold since 1936)--has eluded sequelization. But that may change.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1996 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
International Creative Management said Friday that it agreed to a long-term credit agreement with City National Bank in Beverly Hills, refinancing the debt remaining from the talent agency's 1988 management buyout and providing it with funds for future expansion. The deal ends a lengthy quest by ICM to replace its primary lender--Chase Manhattan--without having to sell a piece of the agency to an outside investor.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1987 | Leonard Klady
Steve Martin and Robin Williams will trod the boards at NYC's Lincoln Center next June in Samuel Beckett's absurdist classic "Waiting for Godot" in the roles (respectively) of Vladimir and Estragon. Mike Nichols directs, with F. Murray Abraham as Pozzo and Bill Irwin as Lucky.
NEWS
August 9, 1987
Come on, boys, let's get our priorities straight . . . Where's Martin Lesak of Abrams Artists? He may not have the clout of a Michael Ovitz or a Sam Cohn, but there's not a better softball, switch-hitting, third baseman in town. TED COSTAS Beverly Hills
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1987 | DAVID FOX
"Well, we're doing an article on Hollywood's talent agents and we think it might be appropriate if we had some photos of the executives at your agency. . . ." That's how we began our quest for the photos you see on these pages. An innocent request, you say? Hardly. Nothing in the film business is ever so simple. The request at agency after agency--well most agencies--was met with silence or "Sorry, no comment." We called private photographers. But they said the photos weren't theirs to give out.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1987 | PAUL ROSENFIELD, Times Staff Writer
"And I'd also like to thank my closest friend, Sam Cohn." The audience at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion--and at Spago and at Elaine's in New York--was assuredly waiting for best supporting actress winner Dianne Wiest to thank the man who is one of the half-dozen most powerful agents in show business. Cohn is the freewheeling, New York-based (mostly at the Russian Tea Room) International Creative Management agent who counts.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1993 | MARSHALL FINE
In the midst of all the recent hoopla about the stage-parenting antics of Kit Culkin, Macaulay's manager-father, it was announced that the Culkins had come to terms with Warner Bros. for Mac to play the title role in a film based on Harvey Comics' character Richie Rich. But not before Culkin Sr. threatened to walk away from the film if he didn't get director approval--and Warners called his bluff. Now that Mac has the role, it's easy to say that it seems like typecasting.
NEWS
May 25, 1992 | BETTY GOODWIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Everybody wants to be in a Garry Marshall or Lowell Ganz production when they grow up. Or so it seemed at the Thursday night party at the Coronet Theater after the opening-night performance of "Wrong Turn at Lungfish," directed and co-written by Marshall ("Happy Days," "Mork and Mindy," "Laverne & Shirley," "Pretty Woman," "Beaches") and Ganz ("City Slickers," "Parenthood," "Splash!").
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