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Sam Cooke

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2010
'Sam Cooke' What: 'American Masters: Sam Cooke: Crossing Over' Where: KCET When: 9 tonight Rating: TV-PG (may be unsuitable for young children)
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2014 | By Amy Reiter
After the long slog of the Rush Week performance shows, the results show on which "American Idol" assembled its top 13 was a brisk, breezy affair. We began the night with 10 men and 10 women. Five men and five women would form the top 10 based on the audience vote. Then the judges would select five of the remaining 10 to sing again. After some deliberation, they would choose the best three. Bria Anai was robbed! Ahem, sorry, that just slipped out. We'll get to that part later.
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NEWS
April 7, 1998 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Clifton M. "Cliff" White, guitarist and bandleader for soul singer Sam Cooke who leaped to fame with the 1950s hit "You Send Me," has died. He was 76. White, who also backed the Mills Brothers, died Thursday in Los Angeles' Midway Hospital Medical Center. A pioneer of soul music, White was there when gospel singer Cooke decided to switch to pop in 1957 with the legendary record that sold more than 2 million copies.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2013 | By David C. Nichols
The pull of history and considerable topicality sells “One Night in Miami…” at Rogue Machine. Although this well appointed dramedy about what might have gone down in the Hampton House hotel the night that Cassius Clay became world heavyweight champion slightly overdoes the 20/20 hindsight, that doesn't stop it from grabbing our imaginations. Inspired by the real-life meeting of Clay, singer Sam Cooke, football star Jim Brown and civil-rights leader Malcolm X on Feb. 25, 1964, playwright Kemp Powers weaves the specifics of their personalities into an engrossing scenario.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2003 | Geoff Boucher
The soul-stirring music of Sam Cooke still echoes on radio and often in film, but beginning this week the handlers of his legacy will turn up the volume on Cooke's role as civil rights activist, prolific songwriter and savvy businessman. "Sam Cooke: Legend," a documentary that arrives in stores Tuesday on DVD and VHS, tracks the life of the influential soul singer from his days as a gospel artist in the 1950s to his violent death in 1964.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1986 | ROBERT HILBURN
It's been too hard living, but I'm afraid to die. I don't know what's up there beyond the sky. --Sam Cooke, "A Change Is Gonna Come" Sam Cooke's story is a screenwriter's dream, so it's not surprising that a film is planned. The question is why it's taken more than 20 years for someone to get going on it. The delay is tied in large part to the timing and circumstances of Cooke's death (he was killed in 1964 in a Los Angeles motel), but also to the strange duality of Cooke's career.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2009 | Associated Press
More than 40 years after his violent death, Sam Cooke is still known as the legendary soul and gospel singer who penned "A Change Is Gonna Come," which found a new audience with the election of America's first black president. But Cooke's brother, L.C. Cooke, says the late singer should also be known for his pioneering business acumen that put him years ahead of his time in the music industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1993 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
The latest Soul Stirrers retrospective CD from Specialty Records begins with the first single the gospel group released after future pop star Sam Cooke joined it in 1951. According to the album's liner notes by Lee Hildebrand and Opal Nations, Cooke's arrival in the group wasn't greeted with enthusiasm by Specialty owner Art Rupe. The label already had one of the nation's leading gospel groups in the Pilgrim Travelers and it signed the Soul Stirrers at the suggestion of the Travelers' J. W.
BOOKS
October 30, 2005 | Charles R. Cross, Charles R. Cross is the author of "Room Full of Mirrors: A Biography of Jimi Hendrix."
ON Dec. 11, 1964, Sam Cooke suffered one of the more bizarre deaths in show business history. At 3 that morning, a clerk at the seedy $3-a-night Hacienda Motel in southwestern Los Angeles fired three rounds at the singer from a .22 revolver. Two of the bullets missed, but one struck Cooke in the chest, prompting him to remark, "Lady, you shot me." Police arrived to find him dead from the gunshot wound, with his head bloodied and various bruises on his body from a scuffle.
BOOKS
February 19, 1995 | Edward J. Boyer, Edward J. Boyer is a Times staff writer
For six years, beginning in the late 1950s, singer Sam Cooke lived on the upper reaches of popular music charts. He recorded or wrote 29 Top 40 singles--more than Little Richard, Buddy Holly and Jerry Lee Lewis combined. In 1986, he was one of the first 10 inductees into the Rock 'n' Roll Hall of Fame.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2010
'Sam Cooke' What: 'American Masters: Sam Cooke: Crossing Over' Where: KCET When: 9 tonight Rating: TV-PG (may be unsuitable for young children)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2009 | Associated Press
More than 40 years after his violent death, Sam Cooke is still known as the legendary soul and gospel singer who penned "A Change Is Gonna Come," which found a new audience with the election of America's first black president. But Cooke's brother, L.C. Cooke, says the late singer should also be known for his pioneering business acumen that put him years ahead of his time in the music industry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 2009 | Geoff Boucher
Allen Klein, the brash music mogul whose five-decade career included stints as the business manager for the Beatles and the Rolling Stones, died Saturday in New York. He was 77. Klein died after a lengthy battle with Alzheimer's disease, according to Bob Merlis, a spokesman for Klein's ABKCO Music & Records. The independent label owns or controls the rights to music by the Rolling Stones, Sam Cooke, the Animals, the Kinks, Chubby Checker and Bobby Womack, among others.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2009 | Thomas Curwen
The silence of night never lasts long. It ends somewhere in the 5 o'clock hour with the purring of the heater and distant strains of Sam Cooke. Edwin Shneidman looks at the clock -- an hour and a half since turning off the TV and closing his eyes. "Mrs. Wiggles," he shouts. He knows that that's not her name, but he likes the joke. Sitting in another room, Pauline Dupuy turns down the CD player and puts her Bible and crossword aside. She stands and walks down the hall into his room.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2006
I want to congratulate Ann Powers on her insightful story regarding 'American Idol's" Taylor Hicks ["Pop in 'Idol' Hands," May 26]. I too became enthralled with the way he was able to take Simon Cowell's game -- or, perhaps more accurately, Simon's ploy -- and turn it to his advantage. Taylor has not spent his life playing in honkytonks and bars without learning a lot about life, and learning the hard way: by making mistakes, by being knocked down, by being denied, but always, always rebounding and remaining true to himself.
BOOKS
October 30, 2005 | Charles R. Cross, Charles R. Cross is the author of "Room Full of Mirrors: A Biography of Jimi Hendrix."
ON Dec. 11, 1964, Sam Cooke suffered one of the more bizarre deaths in show business history. At 3 that morning, a clerk at the seedy $3-a-night Hacienda Motel in southwestern Los Angeles fired three rounds at the singer from a .22 revolver. Two of the bullets missed, but one struck Cooke in the chest, prompting him to remark, "Lady, you shot me." Police arrived to find him dead from the gunshot wound, with his head bloodied and various bruises on his body from a scuffle.
NEWS
December 23, 1994 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His body was found slumped in the doorway of a sleazy tryst stop, his back resting against a desk--no pants, one shoe--a bullet through his heart. He had gone to the motel in his new red Ferrari with a woman he had picked up in a Hollywood restaurant. She later told police he had abducted her and tried to rape her before she managed to flee with his trousers. When he broke down the door to the manager's office searching for her, there was a struggle.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2003 | Geoff Boucher
The soul-stirring music of Sam Cooke still echoes on radio and often in film, but beginning this week the handlers of his legacy will turn up the volume on Cooke's role as civil rights activist, prolific songwriter and savvy businessman. "Sam Cooke: Legend," a documentary that arrives in stores Tuesday on DVD and VHS, tracks the life of the influential soul singer from his days as a gospel artist in the 1950s to his violent death in 1964.
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