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Sam Genensky

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NEWS
July 7, 1994
Passage of Propositions D and E in the recent Santa Monica election will benefit the city in many ways. One of particular note was highlighted in your recent front-page article, "Savoring a World of Beauty After 66 Years In Shadows" (May 23). As your readers may recall, in 1958 mathematician Sam Genensky joined the RAND Corp. working on strategic systems for the U.S. Air Force, among other projects. Mr. Genensky's eyes had been damaged in an accident at birth. In spite of his limited eyesight, he persevered, attended college and became a noted mathematician.
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NEWS
July 7, 1994
Passage of Propositions D and E in the recent Santa Monica election will benefit the city in many ways. One of particular note was highlighted in your recent front-page article, "Savoring a World of Beauty After 66 Years In Shadows" (May 23). As your readers may recall, in 1958 mathematician Sam Genensky joined the RAND Corp. working on strategic systems for the U.S. Air Force, among other projects. Mr. Genensky's eyes had been damaged in an accident at birth. In spite of his limited eyesight, he persevered, attended college and became a noted mathematician.
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NEWS
May 23, 1994 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 66 years, Sam Genensky viewed the world through a succession of magnifying devices, compensating for vision so severely damaged at birth he literally could not see his fingers. Now, the Pacific Palisades mathematician lay in darkness in a hospital, his one functioning eye bandaged, his heart pounding with fear. He had undergone a difficult operation the day before to save the sliver of sight in his right eye.
NEWS
May 23, 1994 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 66 years, Sam Genensky viewed the world through a succession of magnifying devices, compensating for vision so severely damaged at birth he literally could not see his fingers. Now, the Pacific Palisades mathematician lay in darkness in a hospital, his one functioning eye bandaged, his heart pounding with fear. He had undergone a difficult operation the day before to save the sliver of sight in his right eye.
NEWS
November 11, 1986 | URSULA VILS, Times Staff Writer
They are an unusually cheerful group, these patients of the Center for the Partially Sighted in Santa Monica. Some, in addition to serious vision problems, carry an extra burden: injury from accidents, major physical diseases, family and financial problems. All have experienced the emotional depression that failing sight almost invariably means.
NEWS
December 11, 1996 | MARY LOU LOPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It took seven heavyweights--NBC entertainment President Warren Littlefield, comic Jon Stewart, writer Al Franken, TV talk show host Leeza Gibbons, "Frasier's" David Hyde Pierce, Viacom Entertainment Chairman Jonathan Dolgen and MTM Television President Michael Ogiens--to introduce Kerry McCluggage, chairman of the Paramount Television Group, on Monday evening at the Beverly Wilshire. There was an original comedy video starring Kelsey Grammer and Kate Mulgrew.
NEWS
June 22, 1992 | BILL HIGGINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Anyone who's had a career that includes directing Ronald Reagan in "Bedtime for Bonzo," Elvis Presley in "Frankie and Johnny" and executive-producing the "Tonight" show for 22 years certainly deserves an award. And to do all that, to be 81 years old and still be working probably deserves to be called a miracle. "It's been a great roll of the dice," said Fred de Cordova, whose career was honored Saturday at the Beverly Hilton with the Center for the Partially Sighted's Vision Award.
NEWS
December 8, 1996 | MARY LOU LOPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stepping through a grand floral coronet is a tradition at the Coronet Debutante Ball. Twenty young women in white gowns, carrying pink velvet muffs covered with petals, thus made their formal curtsy at the 48th ball in the Beverly Hilton International Ballroom. The Thanksgiving weekend event, with debutantes home from college, traditionally is the first of the holiday debutante balls.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2009 | Elaine Woo
Samuel M. Genensky, a former Rand Corp. mathematician and inventor whose near-blindness led him to help others cope with limited eyesight and become more self-sufficient, died June 26 at his Santa Monica home. He was 81. The cause was complications of heart disease, said LaDonna Ringering, president and chief executive of the Center for the Partially Sighted, a West Los Angeles facility that Genensky founded in 1978.
NEWS
November 11, 1986 | URSULA VILS, Times Staff Writer
They are an unusually cheerful group, these patients of the Center for the Partially Sighted in Santa Monica. Some, in addition to serious vision problems, carry an extra burden: injury from accidents, major physical diseases, family and financial problems. All have experienced the emotional depression that failing sight almost invariably means.
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