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Sam Gilliam

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December 24, 1990 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Washington artist Sam Gilliam was in Southern California recently to christen his solo exhibition at Santa Monica's Koplin Gallery (through Saturday). He is one of the last surviving members of the school of Washington color painters, a vigorous abstractionist. Gilliam, 57, was born in Tupelo, Miss., the seventh of eight children. His father loaded freight in a railroad roundhouse. His mother was a teacher who was eager that her children better themselves.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1990 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Washington artist Sam Gilliam was in Southern California recently to christen his solo exhibition at Santa Monica's Koplin Gallery (through Saturday). He is one of the last surviving members of the school of Washington color painters, a vigorous abstractionist. Gilliam, 57, was born in Tupelo, Miss., the seventh of eight children. His father loaded freight in a railroad roundhouse. His mother was a teacher who was eager that her children better themselves.
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NEWS
May 21, 1995
Samella Sanders Lewis--one of the most prominent African American art historians--describes her pieces as memories collected in the form of art. Now those works, as well as items from 30 other master artists, will be displayed through an exhibit, "The Samella Lewis Collection--Fifty Years," at the Third World Art Exchange in Los Feliz.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1990 | ZAN STEWART
Romare Bearden, Jacob Lawrence, Archibald Motley, Sam Gilliam and Houston Cornwell are among the 60 artists represented in "The Blues Aesthetic: Black Culture and Modernism," an exhibit that opens Sunday at California Afro-American Museum in Exposition Park. "The mixed-media exhibition consists of paintings, prints and sculpture, all mostly early 20th Century pieces, all of which have a musical theme," says Sheila Gantt, the museum's community outreach coordinator.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1986 | ZAN DUBIN
Angry demonstrators weren't alone as they worked for freedom during the American civil rights movement. They had the help of black artists who vigorously and visually upheld the cause. "During the '60s, black artists used their creativity as a vehicle for social change," noted Leonard Simon, a professor of black art history at UC Riverside. "Black artists, previously able to show their work in black museums and galleries only, let the cultural Establishment know about their art.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1990 | KRISTINE McKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Commercialism doesn't interest me--it's just too stupid," comments artist Richard Jackson in explaining the extravagant anti-materialism of his work. Presently at mid-career, Jackson works in construction by day to finance elaborate installations that are virtually collector-proof; his work exists only for its exhibition period, then is destroyed. The subject of a one-man show at the Rosamund Felsen Gallery through Dec.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1991 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael Botwinick, named new director of the Newport Harbor Art Museum on Thursday after a 17-month search, met the press Friday morning and maintained that his "eyes were wide open" when he took the job at least five others had turned down.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1991 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Among the diverse genres of contemporary artistic practice, installation art has been running at high gear for several years. No let-up is in sight. Barbara Bloom, David Bunn, Daniel Buren, Ann Hamilton, Jenny Holzer, Barbara Kruger, Mario Merz, Bruce Nauman, Charles Ray, Jeffrey Vallance, Meg Webster--the list is long. Since the 1970s, artists of different generations, widely divergent sensibilities and a broad range of accomplishment have worked in the installation genre.
NEWS
July 22, 2002 | JOHANNA NEUMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last elephant is unpainted, awaiting a judge's decision on whether People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals has a constitutional right to use the beast for a message about mistreatment of circus animals. But the rest of the so-called party animals are on the streets of the nation's capital. Decorated as everything from Elvis Presley to a tourist donning an FBI baseball cap and sporting a video camera, the animals are providing a touch of whimsy to a city shadowed by terrorism.
HOME & GARDEN
December 8, 2005 | Gayle Pollard-Terry, Times Staff Writer
BEFORE Bernard and Shirley Kinsey remodeled their cliff-side home in Pacific Palisades, they often climbed up on the roof of the original two-bedroom midcentury tract house to take in the magnificent view of Santa Monica Bay. When guests visit, "people want to see the view. That's what we do first," Bernard Kinsey says. But the couple had more on their mind when they called architect Doug Breidenbach.
HOME & GARDEN
July 12, 2007 | Janet Eastman, Times Staff Writer
AT least once a week, Shai Bernat-Kunin visits his grandparents, whose San Fernando Valley home is filled with contemporary art and glass sculptures. During his visit last Friday, the 2-year-old ate lunch in his highchair within a spoon's throw of a one-of-a-kind glass piece by Ivan Mares. Unleashed on the ground, Shai could be like a bull in a china shop. But grandparents Sam and Nancy Kunin have taken precautions to ensure their art is carefully placed, secured and insured.
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