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Sam Jr Goldwyn

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1995 | Elaine Dutka
Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole (R-Kan.) got plenty of attention when he scolded Hollywood about sex and violence in movies, TV and pop music. But, as The Times reports today (see Page A1), Dole's comments aren't changing the face of show business. Yet. The creative and business powerbrokers will tell you they've always been thoughful about what they produce. Here, then, are some snapshots of life on the front lines: SAMUEL GOLDWYN JR. Chairman/CEO, Samuel Goldwyn Co.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1995 | Elaine Dutka
Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole (R-Kan.) got plenty of attention when he scolded Hollywood about sex and violence in movies, TV and pop music. But, as The Times reports today (see Page A1), Dole's comments aren't changing the face of show business. Yet. The creative and business powerbrokers will tell you they've always been thoughful about what they produce. Here, then, are some snapshots of life on the front lines: SAMUEL GOLDWYN JR. Chairman/CEO, Samuel Goldwyn Co.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN
Sam Goldwyn had had two biographies written about him in his lifetime and didn't like either one, his son Sam Goldwyn Jr. says. The motion picture pioneer wanted one written--after his death, so it could be good, and honest. "I went to Michener, who declined, and to Fawn Brodie (the late UCLA historian and biographer of Thomas Jefferson). We almost agreed, then she decided to do Nixon instead," Goldwyn says. When Scott Berg's biography of Maxwell Perkins appeared, Goldwyn was particularly impressed by Berg's ability to place Perkins in the larger context of his times and to keep him the central figure, not overshadowed by Hemingway and the other major authors Perkins was editing.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN
Sam Goldwyn had had two biographies written about him in his lifetime and didn't like either one, his son Sam Goldwyn Jr. says. The motion picture pioneer wanted one written--after his death, so it could be good, and honest. "I went to Michener, who declined, and to Fawn Brodie (the late UCLA historian and biographer of Thomas Jefferson). We almost agreed, then she decided to do Nixon instead," Goldwyn says. When Scott Berg's biography of Maxwell Perkins appeared, Goldwyn was particularly impressed by Berg's ability to place Perkins in the larger context of his times and to keep him the central figure, not overshadowed by Hemingway and the other major authors Perkins was editing.
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