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Sam Kinison

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1987 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
It's hard to account for the rise of Sam Kinison. On the strength of a comedic style principally based on gross-out commentary, a malevolent leer and a fairly incessant stream of bellowing at his audience, Kinison has appeared on TV's "Saturday Night Live" and "Late Night With David Letterman"; he had a cameo in the Rodney Dangerfield movie "Back to School"; he's part of Dangerfield's upcoming HBO special, "It's Not Easy Being Me"; and he has a three-picture deal with Orion Pictures.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
Eddie Pepitone, perhaps the funniest stand-up comedian you've never heard of, gets a deserving close-up in the amusing, freewheeling documentary "The Bitter Buddha. " Although the dyspeptic Pepitone, an unmade bed of a guy in his early 50s, has reportedly been at his craft for 30 years, he's yet to turn into the household name that such not-dissimilar comics as George Carlin, Rodney Dangerfield and Sam Kinison became. Still, the native New Yorker, now living a busy if largely unglamorous life in L.A., consistently plies his trade in comedy clubs.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1988 | CHRIS WILLMAN
There was a time--distant as it now seems--that when a celebrity was going to be bad, the folks at home could at least rest assured he'd only be bad in one medium, which could then be dutifully avoided. No more. Take the case of comedian Sam Kinison, whose once funny and now exasperating screaming shtick, detestable AIDS jokes and embarrassing heavy-metal sycophancy positively can't be avoided these days--least of all on cable music channel MTV.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1997 | SHAUNA SNOW
MOVIES Restored 'Window': Universal Pictures announced plans Friday to restore Alfred Hitchcock's classic 1954 thriller, "Rear Window," starring James Stewart and Grace Kelly. The restoration--expected to take about a year-and-a-half--will be done by the award-winning team of Robert A. Harris and James C. Katz, who previously restored Hitchcock's "Vertigo," as well as Stanley Kubrick's "Spartacus," both for Universal.
NEWS
April 29, 1993 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Dennis McLellan is a Times staff writer who regularly writes about comedy for OC Live!
Carl LaBove, who is headlining at Bruce Baum's Comedy Crib in Fullerton through Sunday, is so theatrical a performer that his act has been likened to a high-speed film festival featuring his greatest influences: Peter Sellers, Bruce Lee and Robert Duvall. Rather than a typical monologue, he will do a series of set pieces.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1988 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Heading east on the Sunset Strip just after dark, Sam Kinison swung his black convertible BMW into traffic, sliding past a pair of slow-moving trucks and zipping through a yellow light, aiming for the dark recesses of Hollywood Boulevard. With the Pentacostal preacher-turned-Gonzo comic hero at the wheel, this wasn't a routine Grey Line Hollywood excursion. Call it . . . a Sightseeing Trip From Hell.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1991 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fox has become the second of the four networks to juggle its new prime-time TV schedule with a series of moves that includes the cancellation of the low-rated "The Ultimate Challenge" and the installation of a comedy series starring Sam Kinison. The changes take effect Nov. 9. The two reality-based comedy series that now occupy the 9-10 p.m. slot on Saturdays--"Best of the Worst" and "Totally Hidden Video"--will move to 9-10 p.m. Fridays in place of "Ultimate Challenge."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1992 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pacing the stage like the Pentecostal preacher he once was, Sam Kinison would work himself into a primal heat as he railed against homosexuals, AIDS, organized religion and one of the topics closest to his heart: Marriage. "Oh, Oh-h-h - h-h! Marriage is hell - l-l-l-l!" the twice-divorced comic would scream. With an infectious giggle and his signature banshee wail, Kinison soared into the public consciousness in the mid-'80s as the King of Shock Comedy.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1992 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the '80s, Sam Kinison served as comedy's raw nerve, dipping below the surface of civility to become the screaming embodiment of blind, bewildered rage. If it was Morning in America, Kinison was our national hangover. Like most stand-up comedians, Kinison traded heavily in the commonality of everyday experience.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1992 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like most stand-up comedians, Sam Kinison traded heavily in the commonality of everyday experience. But while others grazed contentedly among the banalities of air travel and glossed-up memories of bad '60s TV, Kinison strayed off into the next field, where the grass was definitely not greener. In the '80s, Kinison served as comedy's raw nerve, dipping below the surface of civility to become the screaming embodiment of blind, bewildered rage.
BOOKS
June 5, 1994 | ERIKA TAYLOR
BROTHER SAM: The Short Spectacular Life of Sam Kinison by Bill Kinison with Steve Delsohn. (Morrow: $22; 315 pp.) Not everyone liked comedian Sam Kinison's brand of screaming, irreverent humor, but as a performer he was, without question, a true American original. "Brother Sam," written by his older brother and manager, Bill Kinison, sets out to illuminate the man behind the agonized yell.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1993 | DAVID KRONKE
SAM KINISON "Live From Hell" Priority * 1/2 It's bad form to kick folks when they're down, but since Sam Kinison himself reveled in it, what the heck. Recorded six months before his death in April, 1992, "Live From Hell" is an anemic, dated finale. Kinison's trademark rage feels manufactured here, with material more than ever relying on volume more than wit.
NEWS
April 29, 1993 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Dennis McLellan is a Times staff writer who regularly writes about comedy for OC Live!
Carl LaBove, who is headlining at Bruce Baum's Comedy Crib in Fullerton through Sunday, is so theatrical a performer that his act has been likened to a high-speed film festival featuring his greatest influences: Peter Sellers, Bruce Lee and Robert Duvall. Rather than a typical monologue, he will do a series of set pieces.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1992 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the '80s, Sam Kinison served as comedy's raw nerve, dipping below the surface of civility to become the screaming embodiment of blind, bewildered rage. If it was Morning in America, Kinison was our national hangover. Like most stand-up comedians, Kinison traded heavily in the commonality of everyday experience.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1992 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sam Kinison lived for confrontation. No sweet words and kisses from this comic--more like up-the-volume shrieks and hisses to get his message out. Knowing that about the man called "the beast," a nickname Kinison did little to dispute, it was tempting to wonder what he would have thought about all the twinkling praise that engulfed his memory during a tribute at the Celebrity Theatre on Thursday. (Kinison, 38, died in April in an auto collision.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1992 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like most stand-up comedians, Sam Kinison traded heavily in the commonality of everyday experience. But while others grazed contentedly among the banalities of air travel and glossed-up memories of bad '60s TV, Kinison strayed off into the next field, where the grass was definitely not greener. In the '80s, Kinison served as comedy's raw nerve, dipping below the surface of civility to become the screaming embodiment of blind, bewildered rage.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1992 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Clowns are very mad at Bobcat Goldthwait. We don't make this stuff up, folks. Clowns--yeah, really, the kind with rubber noses and big shoes--are upset about the way they're depicted in "Shakes the Clown," Goldthwait's new film about a less-than-wholesome band of clowns who hang out in a bar called the Twisted Balloon. Clowns without a sense of humor? Leave it to Bobcat to bring a brand-new special interest group out of the woodwork.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1988
Madonna is to taste what Gary Hart is to self control; the Ayatollah is to conservatism; Oct. 19, 1987, is to the stock market; and Sam Kinison is to reticence. TAMRA TENNEY San Dimas
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1992 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pacing the stage like the Pentecostal preacher he once was, Sam Kinison would work himself into a primal heat as he railed against homosexuals, AIDS, organized religion and one of the topics closest to his heart: Marriage. "Oh, Oh-h-h - h-h! Marriage is hell - l-l-l-l!" the twice-divorced comic would scream. With an infectious giggle and his signature banshee wail, Kinison soared into the public consciousness in the mid-'80s as the King of Shock Comedy.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1992 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pacing the stage like the Pentecostal preacher he once was, Sam Kinison would work himself into a primal heat as he railed against homosexuals, AIDS victims, organized religion and one of the topics closest to his heart: Marriage. "Oh, Oh-h-h - h-h! Marriage is hell - l-l-l-l!" the twice-divorced comic would scream. With an infectious giggle and his signature banshee wail, Kinison soared into the public consciousness in the mid-'80s as the King of Shock Comedy.
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