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Sam L Ginn

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BUSINESS
April 25, 1988 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
Most of Pacific Bell's residential customers may always see it as just "the phone company" and judge it on the cost of the local service it provides. But the success of the company under its new leadership will depend on a lot more than that. Sam L. Ginn, who on Friday was elected chairman and chief executive of Pacific Bell's parent, Pacific Telesis Group, delineated a triple challenge ahead.
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BUSINESS
March 26, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Pacific Telesis Names Quigley to Succeed Ginn: The board of Pacific Telesis Group named Pacific Bell President Philip Quigley to succeed Sam Ginn as chairman of the Pacific Telesis Group after the Baby Bell spins off its wireless unit next week. Quigley's ascension, which was predicted by the company last year, will take effect next Friday as the wireless unit is officially launched as AirTouch Communications. Ginn will lead AirTouch.
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BUSINESS
August 23, 1993 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Pacific Telesis shareholders ultimately benefit from the proposed spinoff of the company's $1-billion cellular phone operations, few will fare as well as Telesis Chairman Sam Ginn, the plan's principal architect. Ginn will leave Telesis to become chairman of the proposed new wireless communications company, where he will exchange his Telesis stock options for a stake in the spinoff that will probably make him its largest non-institutional investor.
BUSINESS
August 23, 1993 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Pacific Telesis shareholders ultimately benefit from the proposed spinoff of the company's $1-billion cellular phone operations, few will fare as well as Telesis Chairman Sam Ginn, the plan's principal architect. Ginn will leave Telesis to become chairman of the proposed new wireless communications company, where he will exchange his Telesis stock options for a stake in the spinoff that will probably make him its largest non-institutional investor.
BUSINESS
March 26, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Pacific Telesis Names Quigley to Succeed Ginn: The board of Pacific Telesis Group named Pacific Bell President Philip Quigley to succeed Sam Ginn as chairman of the Pacific Telesis Group after the Baby Bell spins off its wireless unit next week. Quigley's ascension, which was predicted by the company last year, will take effect next Friday as the wireless unit is officially launched as AirTouch Communications. Ginn will lead AirTouch.
BUSINESS
September 6, 1985
Dublin-based Lucky Stores elected to its board Sam L. Ginn, vice chairman of Pacific Telesis Group and group president of PacTel Cos.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1988 | BRUCE KEPPEL
Donald E. Guinn, Pacific Telesis' 55-year-old chairman and chief executive, has stepped down after presiding over the firm's annual meeting, passing leadership of Pacific Bell's parent to top lieutenant Sam L. Ginn, 51. Guinn, more than any other single person, was responsible for transforming Pacific Telephone from Ma Bell's sickly stepchild into a strong and profitable independent entity after the 1984 breakup of the Bell System.
BUSINESS
January 24, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back when wireless meant radio and mobile telephones were as unwieldy as Maxwell Smart's shoe, Chris Gent was already convinced that, whatever you called them, portable phones were the future in telecommunications. Gent, chief executive of Vodafone Group, is still looking ahead with his company's successful bid to purchase AirTouch Communications Inc. of San Francisco. The $62-billion acquisition would make it the world's largest mobile phone enterprise.
BUSINESS
May 23, 1993 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By many measures, 1992 was a watershed year for executive compensation. Securities regulators cracked down on disclosure. Accounting regulators spelled out plans for new ways to count pay. And angry shareholders stormed management bastions demanding better performance for their money. Indeed, it seems that there was only one thing that remained virtually constant: Top executives of California companies earned as much as ever last year. And in some cases, they earned much, much more.
BUSINESS
April 30, 1989
20th Century Industries PROPERTY-CASUALTY INSURANCE 6301 Owensmouth Ave. Woodland Hills 91367 818-704-3700 Chief Executive: Louis Foster Exchange: NASDAQ Employees: 1,514 Hiring trend: Increasing 3COM Corp. COMPUTER PERIPHERAL EQUIPMENT 3165 Kifer Road Santa Clara 95052 408-562-6400 Chief Executive: L. William Krause Exchange: NASDAQ Employees: 1,348 Hiring trend: Increasing Aaron Spelling Prod . MOTION PICTURE PRODUCTION 1041 N. Formosa Ave. Los Angeles 90046 213-850-2413 Chief Executive: Aaron Spelling Exchange: AMEX Employees: 1,257 Hiring trend: Increasing Acuson Corp.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1988 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
Most of Pacific Bell's residential customers may always see it as just "the phone company" and judge it on the cost of the local service it provides. But the success of the company under its new leadership will depend on a lot more than that. Sam L. Ginn, who on Friday was elected chairman and chief executive of Pacific Bell's parent, Pacific Telesis Group, delineated a triple challenge ahead.
BUSINESS
May 23, 1993
Source: The compensation data in this chart were provided by Standard & Poor's Compustat Services in Denver and were derived from proxy and 10K filings of California's 100 largest publicly held companies, ranked by revenue. Who Is Listed: The chart lists the top-ranking officer at each company, usually the chief executive officer. In a few cases, we have listed the president rather than the CEO because historic salary trends indicate that the president is the top officer.
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