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Sam Labudde

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NEWS
October 19, 1989 | ELIZABETH VENANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fluffy and white as snow drifts, a pair of big, beautiful poodles bound into the glacier-sleek marble foyer, nuzzling the man with the unshaven shadow around his chin, the safari garb, the cowboy boots. He reaches to pat them--this new Indiana Jones of the environment, just back from Alaska--tenderly caressing these luxurious specimens of nature in another icily opulent environment. Lean and intense, Sam LaBudde, 33, has lived for a decade as a drifter.
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NEWS
May 12, 1991
Concerning an article April 22 titled "Ecologists Honored for Their Work" by Connie Koenenn, I would like to point out an error regarding the type of net involved in Sam LaBudde's video footage showing porpoise being caught in a fishing net. The net in the video is a purse seine, not a drift net as stated in the article. Most of the tuna of the world are caught in purse seines, not drift nets. The U. S. tuna fleet fishes with purse seines, but are the undisputed world leaders in lowering porpoise mortality associated with seining operations.
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NEWS
May 12, 1991
Concerning an article April 22 titled "Ecologists Honored for Their Work" by Connie Koenenn, I would like to point out an error regarding the type of net involved in Sam LaBudde's video footage showing porpoise being caught in a fishing net. The net in the video is a purse seine, not a drift net as stated in the article. Most of the tuna of the world are caught in purse seines, not drift nets. The U. S. tuna fleet fishes with purse seines, but are the undisputed world leaders in lowering porpoise mortality associated with seining operations.
NEWS
October 19, 1989 | ELIZABETH VENANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fluffy and white as snow drifts, a pair of big, beautiful poodles bound into the glacier-sleek marble foyer, nuzzling the man with the unshaven shadow around his chin, the safari garb, the cowboy boots. He reaches to pat them--this new Indiana Jones of the environment, just back from Alaska--tenderly caressing these luxurious specimens of nature in another icily opulent environment. Lean and intense, Sam LaBudde, 33, has lived for a decade as a drifter.
NEWS
August 19, 1999 | From Associated Press
Environmental groups sued Wednesday to block a federal decision allowing tuna to be sold as dolphin-safe even when it is caught with the huge, encircling nets once blamed for killing hundreds of thousands of dolphins. "It's a death warrant for dolphins," said Sam LaBudde, a marine biologist who led the dolphin safe campaign in the 1980s after posing as a cook on a Mexican tuna boat for six months and videotaping the slaughter.
NEWS
April 22, 1991 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sam LaBudde of San Francisco, whose daring, secret videotaping of dolphin killings by tuna fishermen sparked industry reform, is the U.S. recipient of a $60,000 Goldman Environmental Prize for grass-roots heroism. Six international prizes of $60,000 will be awarded today at a ceremony in San Francisco.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1990 | From Associated Press
Ghosts and gangsters, bullets and blood may have dominated movies this summer, but as fall and winter arrive, look for Hollywood to start turning green. Filmmakers have been vowing for months to do something about the environment, and all that talk is finally hitting the screen as summer comes to a close. In David Lynch's "Wild at Heart," Laura Dern frets that the depleting ozone layer means the Earth could burn like "an electrical range."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1989 | ANTHONY MILLICAN, Times Staff Writer
Even while the U. S. tuna industry has changed drastically over the years, for Eddie Diehl and a small group of San Diego fishermen, the method of tuna fishing has remained the same. Diehl, 66, and about nine other San Diego bait boat owners still use poles to catch tuna, much like fishermen did at the turn of the century. "We fish the way it was always done," Diehl said recently as he readied his boat for a 30- to 40-day trip to the North Pacific. "We always will."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1989 | ANTHONY MILLICAN, Times Staff Writer
Even while thS. tuna industry has changed drastically over the years, for Eddy Diehl and a small group of San Diego fishermen the method of tuna fishing has remained the same. Diehl, 66, and about 10 other San Diego bait boat owners still use poles to catch tuna, much as fishermen did at the turn of the century. "We fish the way it was always done," Diehl said recently as he readied his boat for a 30- to 40-day trip to the North Pacific. "We always will."
MAGAZINE
January 11, 1998 | Alan Weisman, Contributing editor Alan Weisman's next book, "Gaviotas: A Village to Reinvent the World," will be published this spring by Chelsea Green
Over plates of pasta in Cafe Piccolo in Redondo Beach, two members of the so-called Environmental Dream Team are plotting to temporarily commandeer the Grand Wailea Resort on the island of Maui. The occasion, an annual sales meeting of Atlanta-based Interface Inc., one of the world's largest carpet manufacturers, seems an unlikely target for insurrection, especially since these men have the enthusiastic cooperation of the hotel. The man doing most of the talking is John Picard.
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