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Sam Maloof

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2011
Part of the Pacific Standard Time initiative, the exhibition "The House That Sam Built: Sam Maloof and Art in the Pomona Valley, 1945-1985" presents works spanning more than 25 years of the acclaimed woodworker's career, as he emerged as the front runner of the American studio furniture movement. This major survey includes 30 Maloof pieces in addition to 80 works by his friends and colleagues, among them Millard Sheets, Karl Benjamin, Otto and Gertrud Natzler and Kay Sekimachi. Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens, 1151 Oxford Road, San Marino.
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NEWS
February 25, 2014 | By Lisa Boone
Los Angeles Modern Auctions (LAMA), which sold 86% of the nearly 400 lots offered in its Sunday sale, reported the highest total in its 22-year history Monday, realizing $5.12 million in sales, including commissions. The surprise of the show was the sale of the intricate multi-lobed wire hanging sculpture "Untitled S. 437" by Ruth Asawa, shown above, which was expected to fetch between $300,000 and $400,000. The sculpture set a new LAMA record for a single work, going for $1.43 million and tying the world auction record for the sculptor who died last year.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2011 | By Karen Wada, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Sam Maloof's home was a haven for art. The master furniture-maker filled his sprawling redwood house in Alta Loma, east of Los Angeles, with a profusion of pieces that he created in his adjoining workshop or collected with his first wife, Alfreda. Many items — paintings, sculptures, ceramics, fiber art, enamels — were produced by friends in the artistic community that blossomed around the nearby college town of Claremont after World War II. Maloof, who died at 93 in 2009, was a major figure in that community, says Hal Nelson, curator of American decorative arts at the Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2011 | By Karen Wada, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Sam Maloof's home was a haven for art. The master furniture-maker filled his sprawling redwood house in Alta Loma, east of Los Angeles, with a profusion of pieces that he created in his adjoining workshop or collected with his first wife, Alfreda. Many items — paintings, sculptures, ceramics, fiber art, enamels — were produced by friends in the artistic community that blossomed around the nearby college town of Claremont after World War II. Maloof, who died at 93 in 2009, was a major figure in that community, says Hal Nelson, curator of American decorative arts at the Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1999 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rocking chairs and excitement go together like oil and water. In the popular imagination, such old-fashioned chairs have long been associated with lazy afternoons whiled away on comfortable porches. Excitement, on the contrary, comes in all shapes and sizes--except that of the rocking chair, which shares more with the soothing back-and-forth motion of a baby's cradle than with the breakneck speed of a supersonic jet. At Tobey C.
NEWS
June 18, 1985 | JACK JONES, Times Staff Writer
Noted furniture maker Sam Maloof, 69, was in what he called "a state of shock" Monday to be one of seven Californians named as winners of MacArthur Foundation fellowships providing tax-free, five-year stipends--with no strings attached. "I don't know how they even selected me," Maloof said in Alta Loma, where he lives in a seven-acre lemon grove near the foot of the San Gabriel Mountains and makes what many regard as the finest furniture crafted in California. "It's very thrilling.
NEWS
December 26, 1994 | BOB SIPCHEN
Woodworker Sam Maloof's meandering, organically designed Alta Loma home and workshop remains in the path of the Foothill Freeway. And Maloof, 78, and his wife, Freda, remain intent on preserving the place that many craft-movement cognoscenti consider a masterpiece ("A Man of the Woods," July 24, Life & Style). To that end, supporters have created the nonprofit Sam and Freda Maloof Foundation for Arts and Crafts.
HOME & GARDEN
June 5, 2003 | John Balzar, Times Staff Writer
Fifty years ago, internationally acclaimed woodworker Sam Maloof cleared a piece of a citrus orchard north of what is now Ontario International Airport in San Bernardino County. Because money was scarce, he built an undistinguished, flat-roofed, 800-square-foot frame cottage, not unlike countless other crowded little starter houses that went up in tracts across Southern California after World War II.
NEWS
July 24, 1994 | BOB SIPCHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not far from the Alta Loma lemon grove harboring Sam Maloof's home and workshop, a shiny city sign proclaims Maloof Avenue. The street wasn't named for Sam, who is merely the region's, and the world's, best-known woodworker. It honors, rather, a distant relative who earned his fortune selling cars. Now Southern California's autopia is finally losing patience with the woodworker, who by most indications is woefully out of step with the times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2009 | Janet Eastman
Sam Maloof, a designer and woodworker whose furniture was initially prized for its simplicity and practicality by Southern Californian homeowners in the 1950s and later valued for its beauty and timelessness by collectors, museum curators and U.S. presidents, has died. He was 93. Maloof died Thursday at his home in the Alta Loma section of Rancho Cucamonga, his longtime business manager Roz Bock confirmed. No further details were given.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2011
Part of the Pacific Standard Time initiative, the exhibition "The House That Sam Built: Sam Maloof and Art in the Pomona Valley, 1945-1985" presents works spanning more than 25 years of the acclaimed woodworker's career, as he emerged as the front runner of the American studio furniture movement. This major survey includes 30 Maloof pieces in addition to 80 works by his friends and colleagues, among them Millard Sheets, Karl Benjamin, Otto and Gertrud Natzler and Kay Sekimachi. Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens, 1151 Oxford Road, San Marino.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2009 | Janet Eastman
Sam Maloof, a designer and woodworker whose furniture was initially prized for its simplicity and practicality by Southern Californian homeowners in the 1950s and later valued for its beauty and timelessness by collectors, museum curators and U.S. presidents, has died. He was 93. Maloof died Thursday at his home in the Alta Loma section of Rancho Cucamonga, his longtime business manager Roz Bock confirmed. No further details were given.
HOME & GARDEN
August 30, 2008 | David A. Keeps, Times Staff Writer
SHIRLEY NYQUIST, the vivacious record-keeper of her husband's furniture-making business, pulls out a typewritten list from 1960 showing a walnut armchair with sculpted back and upholstered seat priced at $125. And today? That same chair would be $4,500. John Nyquist may not be a top name, but his made-to-order furnishings command top dollar. The Long Beach woodworker has hand-built his legacy among aficionados of midcentury design for almost 50 years. Look to the current vogue for solid wood tables and chairs from contemporary manufacturers such as Thos.
HOME & GARDEN
June 19, 2003
Regarding "An Eye and Heart for Detail" (June 5), a few years ago I read of a book signing by President Jimmy Carter and I rushed to the bookstore before he had to leave. I was the last person in line and took advantage of a brief pause and expressed to Mr. Carter that we had a mutual friend. When I mentioned Sam Maloof's name, Mr. Carter said, "Oh my goodness, he is one of my heroes!" John Balzar's article captured the warm feelings, the joy and the pride of ownership that many of us who know Sam have been fortunate enough to have experienced.
HOME & GARDEN
June 5, 2003 | John Balzar, Times Staff Writer
Fifty years ago, internationally acclaimed woodworker Sam Maloof cleared a piece of a citrus orchard north of what is now Ontario International Airport in San Bernardino County. Because money was scarce, he built an undistinguished, flat-roofed, 800-square-foot frame cottage, not unlike countless other crowded little starter houses that went up in tracts across Southern California after World War II.
OPINION
November 24, 2002 | JOHN BALZAR
If this is the age when anything is possible, isn't it peculiar how narrowly we define the bounds of success in pursuing it? Those who set the cultural trends are decidedly single-minded about the proper trajectory for "making it" just now: Parents must do anything they can -- apparently quite literally anything -- to get their children into the best nursery schools. If one's weight and age add up to 20, it's high time to get started. A day lost from the rat race is a day falling behind.
HOME & GARDEN
June 19, 2003
Regarding "An Eye and Heart for Detail" (June 5), a few years ago I read of a book signing by President Jimmy Carter and I rushed to the bookstore before he had to leave. I was the last person in line and took advantage of a brief pause and expressed to Mr. Carter that we had a mutual friend. When I mentioned Sam Maloof's name, Mr. Carter said, "Oh my goodness, he is one of my heroes!" John Balzar's article captured the warm feelings, the joy and the pride of ownership that many of us who know Sam have been fortunate enough to have experienced.
NEWS
February 25, 2014 | By Lisa Boone
Los Angeles Modern Auctions (LAMA), which sold 86% of the nearly 400 lots offered in its Sunday sale, reported the highest total in its 22-year history Monday, realizing $5.12 million in sales, including commissions. The surprise of the show was the sale of the intricate multi-lobed wire hanging sculpture "Untitled S. 437" by Ruth Asawa, shown above, which was expected to fetch between $300,000 and $400,000. The sculpture set a new LAMA record for a single work, going for $1.43 million and tying the world auction record for the sculptor who died last year.
NEWS
August 29, 2002 | JANET EASTMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two rocking chairs make it clear that Sam Maloof's world is shaped by his heart and his hands. The celebrated contemporary furniture designer made each--by hand--to honor two women who mean so much to him: Freda's Chair for his wife of 50 years until her death; Beverly's Chair for the woman who fell in love first with a walnut table then, a half-century later, married the man who made it. Maloof, whose sculptural wood furniture is so prized by collectors, museum directors and even U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1999 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rocking chairs and excitement go together like oil and water. In the popular imagination, such old-fashioned chairs have long been associated with lazy afternoons whiled away on comfortable porches. Excitement, on the contrary, comes in all shapes and sizes--except that of the rocking chair, which shares more with the soothing back-and-forth motion of a baby's cradle than with the breakneck speed of a supersonic jet. At Tobey C.
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