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Sam Nujoma

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NEWS
March 19, 1985 | From Reuters
The visiting leader of the South-West Africa People's Organization, Sam Nujoma, said Monday that China has agreed to increase its aid to his Namibian guerrilla movement. A Marxist, Nujoma described the Peking leadership as "friends in arms."
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WORLD
November 14, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
After 14 years in office, President Sam Nujoma is preparing to step down as Namibia holds elections Monday and Tuesday. The 75-year-old Nujoma led the southwest African nation to independence and is the only leader its 1.8 million people have ever known. Neutral observers expect the election to be free and fair. Hifikepunye Pohamba, Nujoma's handpicked successor, is expected to win. Abroad, Nujoma is known for making outlandish statements, such as claiming AIDS was a man-made biological weapon.
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NEWS
March 4, 1986 | From Reuters
Sam Nujoma, leader of the South-West African People's Organization, has thanked the Soviet Union for aiding his cause and criticized the United States, West Germany and Britain. The Soviet Communist Party daily Pravda published a speech Monday that Nujoma made last week at the party's 27th congress in Moscow. Nujoma is fighting for independence for Namibia (South-West Africa) and has visited Moscow several times in the past. South Africa says SWAPO receives Soviet arms.
NEWS
December 5, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Hundreds of jubilant supporters in Namibia's capital, Windhoek, celebrated the runaway victories of President Sam Nujoma and his ruling party in the South African nation's third democratic election. With most of the ballots counted, the South-West African People's Organization, or SWAPO, had 77% of the vote. Nujoma, 70, also took 77% of the presidential ballot in winning a third term.
NEWS
December 5, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Hundreds of jubilant supporters in Namibia's capital, Windhoek, celebrated the runaway victories of President Sam Nujoma and his ruling party in the South African nation's third democratic election. With most of the ballots counted, the South-West African People's Organization, or SWAPO, had 77% of the vote. Nujoma, 70, also took 77% of the presidential ballot in winning a third term.
NEWS
November 16, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The former guerrilla leader who is likely to become Namibia's first president promised to protect individual rights and said that he might establish a one-party political system. Sam Nujoma, leader of the leftist South-West Africa People's Organization, also said he will try to avoid dealings with the white-run government in South Africa, which is ceding control of Namibia after a 74-year rule. Nujoma said English will become the sole official language of Namibia's government and schools.
WORLD
November 14, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
After 14 years in office, President Sam Nujoma is preparing to step down as Namibia holds elections Monday and Tuesday. The 75-year-old Nujoma led the southwest African nation to independence and is the only leader its 1.8 million people have ever known. Neutral observers expect the election to be free and fair. Hifikepunye Pohamba, Nujoma's handpicked successor, is expected to win. Abroad, Nujoma is known for making outlandish statements, such as claiming AIDS was a man-made biological weapon.
NEWS
September 14, 1989 | From Associated Press
Sam Nujoma, leader of the SWAPO guerrilla movement, received a hero's welcome today as he ended 30 years in exile to compete for political power in soon-to-be-independent Namibia. Tight security measures were in force because of threats on Nujoma's life and the assassination Tuesday of Anton Lubowski, the only white with a leadership post in the South-West Africa People's Organization. Earlier today, police announced the arrest of a suspect in the assassination of Lubowski.
NEWS
February 10, 1990 | From United Press International
The constituent assembly unanimously adopted a new constitution for the territory Friday, opening the way for independence for Africa's last colony next month. The constitution was agreed on by all 72 members of the assembly at an open-air ceremony on the steps of the colonial Tintenpalast administration building. "Now, therefore, we the people of Namibia accept and adopt this constitution as the fundamental law of our sovereign and independent republic," assembly Chairman Hage Geingob said.
NEWS
March 21, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Sam Nujoma took the oath as president of this newborn nation today, it marked the end of a personal battle for liberation that began almost exactly 30 years ago when the rebel leader slipped out of the territory to launch a bush war against South African colonialists. Nujoma, a stocky man of 60 years with a thick white beard, has been called uneducated and ruthless by his opponents and a kindly man of the people by his supporters.
NEWS
June 20, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Namibian President Sam Nujoma, describing his three-month-old republic as one of the world's poorest nations, appealed to President Bush on Tuesday for increased American aid and invited U.S. private investment in agriculture, health and housing projects. Dismissing World Bank figures that depict Namibia's per capita income as among the highest in sub-Saharan Africa, Nujoma said: "We are truly one of the poorest people on this Earth, truly among the least developed in the world."
NEWS
March 21, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Sam Nujoma took the oath as president of this newborn nation today, it marked the end of a personal battle for liberation that began almost exactly 30 years ago when the rebel leader slipped out of the territory to launch a bush war against South African colonialists. Nujoma, a stocky man of 60 years with a thick white beard, has been called uneducated and ruthless by his opponents and a kindly man of the people by his supporters.
NEWS
March 21, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South African President Frederik W. de Klerk, ending 75 years of often bloody colonial rule over this desert territory, ordered the lowering of his nation's flag early today, and the new blue, red and green colors of Namibia were run up the flagpole, establishing the world's newest nation. "The independence of Namibia marks the beginning of a new era for the whole of southern Africa," De Klerk declared before South African soldiers lowered the flag.
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | From Associated Press
Sam Nujoma, a former guerrilla leader who spent 30 years in exile, was elected Namibia's first president Friday and will take office when the territory wins independence from South Africa on March 21. Nujoma, 60, helped found the South-West Africa People's Organization in 1960 and led it through a 23-year guerrilla war against South African rule of Namibia, Africa's last colony.
NEWS
February 10, 1990 | From United Press International
The constituent assembly unanimously adopted a new constitution for the territory Friday, opening the way for independence for Africa's last colony next month. The constitution was agreed on by all 72 members of the assembly at an open-air ceremony on the steps of the colonial Tintenpalast administration building. "Now, therefore, we the people of Namibia accept and adopt this constitution as the fundamental law of our sovereign and independent republic," assembly Chairman Hage Geingob said.
NEWS
November 16, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The former guerrilla leader who is likely to become Namibia's first president promised to protect individual rights and said that he might establish a one-party political system. Sam Nujoma, leader of the leftist South-West Africa People's Organization, also said he will try to avoid dealings with the white-run government in South Africa, which is ceding control of Namibia after a 74-year rule. Nujoma said English will become the sole official language of Namibia's government and schools.
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | From Associated Press
Sam Nujoma, a former guerrilla leader who spent 30 years in exile, was elected Namibia's first president Friday and will take office when the territory wins independence from South Africa on March 21. Nujoma, 60, helped found the South-West Africa People's Organization in 1960 and led it through a 23-year guerrilla war against South African rule of Namibia, Africa's last colony.
NEWS
September 15, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Sam Nujoma, the black nationalist leader of Namibia's guerrillas, returned home Thursday after 30 years in exile to the tumultuous welcome of thousands amid heightened fears that his life is in danger. Only two days after Nujoma's most senior white adviser was assassinated, apparently by right-wing extremists, Nujoma stepped down from a chartered Boeing 767 jet to lead his South-West Africa People's Organization (SWAPO) in U.N.
NEWS
September 15, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Sam Nujoma, the black nationalist leader of Namibia's guerrillas, returned home Thursday after 30 years in exile to the tumultuous welcome of thousands amid heightened fears that his life is in danger. Only two days after Nujoma's most senior white adviser was assassinated, apparently by right-wing extremists, Nujoma stepped down from a chartered Boeing 767 jet to lead his South-West Africa People's Organization (SWAPO) in U.N.
NEWS
September 14, 1989 | From Associated Press
Sam Nujoma, leader of the SWAPO guerrilla movement, received a hero's welcome today as he ended 30 years in exile to compete for political power in soon-to-be-independent Namibia. Tight security measures were in force because of threats on Nujoma's life and the assassination Tuesday of Anton Lubowski, the only white with a leadership post in the South-West Africa People's Organization. Earlier today, police announced the arrest of a suspect in the assassination of Lubowski.
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