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Sam Peckinpah

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1993 | JANE GALBRAITH
A Hollywood conundrum: How can a film be branded with an NC-17 rating today when the same movie was rated R in 1969? Answer: When the film is Sam Peckinpah's "The Wild Bunch." A restored director's cut of "The Wild Bunch" was to be re-released theatrically in revival houses in Los Angeles and San Francisco next month until Warner Bros. received word from the Motion Picture Assn. of America that the movie would be rated for adults only--"no children under 17 admitted."
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
The UCLA Film & Television Archive's Festival of Preservation turns its spotlight on the small screen with a tribute Saturday to the television work of an award-winning actress and a celebration March 23 of an acclaimed but short-lived ABC anthology series. Julie Harris has won five Tony Awards and is best known to film fans for her role as James Dean's character's love interest in 1955's "East of Eden. " During the 1950s, she was one of the superstars of live drama anthologies. One of her earliest TV appearances, in the1951 Goodyear Television Playhouse "October Story," screens Saturday afternoon at the Billy Wilder Theater in Westwood.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2004 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Sam PECKINPAH was a pariah in Hollywood when he died in 1984 at the age of 59. His 1969 revisionist western, "The Wild Bunch," had put him on the international cinema map. But thanks to drugs, alcohol, heart problems and fights with producers, "He was a nobody, literally, when he died," says Peckinpah expert Nick Redman. In the years since, his reputation has grown in large part because of the efforts of people such as Paul Seydor, author of the authoritative "Peckinpah: The Western Films."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2012
Robert Redford Before his superstar days, Redford appear in the Oct. 20, 1961, episode, "First-Class Mouliak," directed by William Conrad of "Cannon" fame Sam Peckinpah "The Wild Bunch" director cut his teeth in TV. He directed the "Mon Petit Chou" episode that aired Nov. 24, 1961, with guest Lee Marvin Boris Karloff Karloff joined fellow movie monsters Lon Chaney Jr. and Peter Lorre in the "Lizard's Leg and Owlet's...
BOOKS
December 8, 1991 | Grover Lewis, Lewis, a Santa Monica-based journalist, is the author of "Academy All the Way," a collection of Hollywood reportage
The movies, which many of us grew up regarding as the co-literature of the age, have sunk to an abysmal low unimaginable only a few years ago. The bell started tolling for the form with the introduction of the video cassette-as-packaged-commodity and the reintroduction of the theater-as-box, both events mirroring historically the period early in the century when movie producers sold their reels for so much a foot to storefront exhibitors serving largely illiterate audiences.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2009 | Susan King
Though some critics hated it when it was released in 1969, Sam Peckinpah's seminal western "The Wild Bunch" is today considered one of the most influential, poetic -- and yes, violent -- sagebrush sagas ever made. "The Wild Bunch" changed the face of filmmaking with its bloody scenes shot in slow-motion from multiple angles and its innovative, quick-cut editing style. Many have imitated the violence, but few have been able to capture its spirit and beauty. "It's something you will never see in a western before, and you will never see it again," says Ernest Borgnine, who played the vicious outlaw Dutch Engstrom in the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1993
As whenever a new Western is announced, I'm looking forward to "Bad Girls," the Tamra Davis-directed feature Goldstein mentions. It's interesting to note that the scene she describes from her film, in which a woman turns oral sex into blood revenge, was anticipated 16 years ago in the Julius J. Epstein-Herbert Asmodi script for "Cross of Iron." That film was directed by the noted feminist Sam Peckinpah. JIM BEAVER Van Nuys
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1990 | GREG BRAXTON, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The Peckinpah Papers: The files of late director Sam Peckinpah, who raised cinematic violence to a new level in "The Wild Bunch" (1969) and "Straw Dogs" (1971), are being opened to the public for study and research by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. In addition to annotated scripts, production and casting memos, the collection contains extensive correspondence files and a large amount of legal and financial material.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Producer-writer-director David E. Peckinpah, 54, nephew of the late director Sam Peckinpah, died of heart failure Sunday in Vancouver, Canada, where he lived with his family, publicist Warren Cowan said. Peckinpah was executive producer of the TV series "Sliders" from 1996 to 1999, "Turks" in 1999 and "Silk Stalkings" in 1991. He was screenwriter on the 1994 film "The Paperboy."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2011 | By Gina McIntyre, Los Angeles Times
In one of her most famous reviews, Pauline Kael described Sam Peckinpah's "Straw Dogs" as "the first American film that is a fascist work of art. " Released in 1971, the movie follows an American mathematician, David Sumner (Dustin Hoffman), and his wife, Amy (Susan George), who become the subject of an escalating series of attacks by a gang of locals; its graphic depiction of rape and murder crystallized the filmmaker's worldview that humans are instinctively attuned to violence. No one is more aware of the film's complicated legacy than Rod Lurie.
NEWS
December 23, 2009 | By Glenn Whipp
"Hurt Locker" screenwriter Mark Boal remembers running around the Jordanian desert with director Kathryn Bigelow, watching her scale hills in 115-degree heat to set up shots for their modestly budgeted film. By the end of the day, when everyone else was exhausted, Bigelow would look like she was just beginning her morning, raring and ready to go shoot the next scene. "She's got those Viking genes," Boal says. "I'm serious. They live forever, those people. It's the Viking genes and a whole lot of salmon."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2009 | Susan King
Though some critics hated it when it was released in 1969, Sam Peckinpah's seminal western "The Wild Bunch" is today considered one of the most influential, poetic -- and yes, violent -- sagebrush sagas ever made. "The Wild Bunch" changed the face of filmmaking with its bloody scenes shot in slow-motion from multiple angles and its innovative, quick-cut editing style. Many have imitated the violence, but few have been able to capture its spirit and beauty. "It's something you will never see in a western before, and you will never see it again," says Ernest Borgnine, who played the vicious outlaw Dutch Engstrom in the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2007 | Michael Sragow, Baltimore Sun
The keenest observation about the Coen brothers' "No Country for Old Men" came from its ace cinematographer, Roger Deakins. He said that from the moment he read the script, he saw it as a Sam Peckinpah movie. With all the ink spilled over the resurgence of the western, Peckinpah, the most influential and talented director of westerns of the past 50 years, and for my money the greatest of all American filmmakers, has received short shrift.
NEWS
September 7, 2006 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
THE American Cinematheque's "The Ballad of Blood Sam: The Films of Sam Peckinpah" features eight films from the influential, controversial director, screening tonight through Wednesday at the Aero Theatre. Because his films were extremely violent, they were often misunderstood. Peckinpah wasn't extolling the virtues of blood and guts but holding a mirror up to mankind's inner demons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Producer-writer-director David E. Peckinpah, 54, nephew of the late director Sam Peckinpah, died of heart failure Sunday in Vancouver, Canada, where he lived with his family, publicist Warren Cowan said. Peckinpah was executive producer of the TV series "Sliders" from 1996 to 1999, "Turks" in 1999 and "Silk Stalkings" in 1991. He was screenwriter on the 1994 film "The Paperboy."
NEWS
January 8, 1989
Ride the High Country (Channel 5 Monday at 1:30 a.m.): The mellow, much-loved 1962 Western for which Sam Peckinpah managed to persuade Randolph Scott and Joel McCrea to face the cameras one last time. (2:00) 1900 (Z Monday at 11 p.m., completed Tuesday at 11 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2006 | Susan King
Sam Peckinpah's Legendary Westerns Collection (Warner Home Video, $60 for the set; $20 to $27 each) THE mastery of the controversial, iconoclastic director is represented in this collection of four of his westerns: 1962's "Ride the High Country," 1969's "The Wild Bunch," 1970's "The Ballad of Cable Hogue" and 1973's "Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2006 | Susan King
Sam Peckinpah's Legendary Westerns Collection (Warner Home Video, $60 for the set; $20 to $27 each) THE mastery of the controversial, iconoclastic director is represented in this collection of four of his westerns: 1962's "Ride the High Country," 1969's "The Wild Bunch," 1970's "The Ballad of Cable Hogue" and 1973's "Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2004 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Sam PECKINPAH was a pariah in Hollywood when he died in 1984 at the age of 59. His 1969 revisionist western, "The Wild Bunch," had put him on the international cinema map. But thanks to drugs, alcohol, heart problems and fights with producers, "He was a nobody, literally, when he died," says Peckinpah expert Nick Redman. In the years since, his reputation has grown in large part because of the efforts of people such as Paul Seydor, author of the authoritative "Peckinpah: The Western Films."
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