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Sam Pizzigati

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BUSINESS
January 5, 1993 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
If Bill Clinton can reform our health care system, he would help millions of workers, including, incidentally, several thousand unhappy retirees of Primerica Corp., formerly American Can Co., whose medical benefits were slashed recently by the firm's executives. He could even give those retirees a tad of satisfaction if Congress approves his plan to raise taxes on the very wealthy, such as those Primerica executives.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
January 5, 1993 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
If Bill Clinton can reform our health care system, he would help millions of workers, including, incidentally, several thousand unhappy retirees of Primerica Corp., formerly American Can Co., whose medical benefits were slashed recently by the firm's executives. He could even give those retirees a tad of satisfaction if Congress approves his plan to raise taxes on the very wealthy, such as those Primerica executives.
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OPINION
June 23, 2013
Re "A tax system that targets workers," Opinion, June 20 Bob Lord's and Sam Pizzigati's analysis should form the conclusion of any study of the effects of supply-side economic policy since the time of Ronald Reagan. The evidence is in: Tax cuts do not pay for themselves and they are a poor strategy for growing our economy. At the end of 2012, the deficit topped $1 trillion, and in March, the government began implementing $85 billion in spending cuts. With regard to these cuts, Lord and Pizzigati omit a critical point: Back-door taxes in the form of fees have skyrocketed while the quality and quantity of public goods and services has plummeted.
OPINION
December 26, 2012 | By Sam Pizzigati
Close your eyes in Washington these days and you can almost hear the echoes of 1932. Eighty years ago, just like today, a fiscal crisis almost totally dominated the nation's capital. Then, as now, fiscal conservatives demanded immediate action to fix a federal budget awash in red ink. And then, as now, average Americans wondered why all the fuss about deficits. The Depression was in its third year, and millions had no jobs. Why were politicians haggling about balancing the budget?
OPINION
June 20, 2013 | By Bob Lord and Sam Pizzigati
Imagine a society with two tax systems. One taxes the wealth people have accumulated. The other taxes the labor people perform. This society seems to be getting along well enough, raising enough tax revenue to finance the public goods and services that voters have told lawmakers they want to see supported. Now imagine that lawmakers have decided to cut the tax rates on wealth and raise them on labor. At the same time, the amount of wealth subject to the lower tax rates is rising as income from labor is shrinking.
OPINION
September 9, 2010 | By Sarah Anderson and Sam Pizzigati
Joel Gemunder, the chief executive officer of Omnicare, retired on July 31, almost exactly one year after his company announced a wide array of wage cuts and layoffs. The former head of the nation's top provider of pharmaceuticals for seniors won't have to worry much about his own personal economic security. He's walking off into his golden years with a getaway package worth at least $130 million. Gemunder's sweet deal only hints at the excess still pulsing through America's executive suites.
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