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Sam Riney

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1989 | DON HECKMAN
Give saxophonist Sam Riney credit for one thing: total intensity. His recent performance at Bon Appetit in Westwood virtually sizzled with high voltage. Riney didn't just play a song--he grabbed it, shook it and squeezed the juice out of it. The result was a series of improvisations performed at their emotional maximum. Like Chaka Khan, whom Riney credits as an influence on his phrasing, the saxophonist worked only with broad splashes of primary colors.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1992 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIME
Saxophonist Sam Riney and trombonist Andy Martin go about the same thing in different ways. On "Talk to Me," Riney's latest album that's currently No. 16 on Billboard's contemporary jazz charts, the horn man with the bold sound solos fervently in a modern, electronically assisted setting enlivened by propulsive rock-based rhythms. Yet Riney says his early influences were such mainstream sax giants as Charlie Parker, Cannonball Adderly and Joe Henderson.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
Like so many aspiring horn players today, Sam Riney has chosen not to concentrate on a single instrument and become its total master; instead, he changed horns with almost every tune. Possibly for this reason, or perhaps simply because it takes years to reach the requisite level of maturity, he has not yet acquired a distinctive personality. Performing at the weekly jazz brunch at the Hollywood Holiday Inn Sunday, Riney began on soprano saxophone.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1989 | DON HECKMAN
Give saxophonist Sam Riney credit for one thing: total intensity. His recent performance at Bon Appetit in Westwood virtually sizzled with high voltage. Riney didn't just play a song--he grabbed it, shook it and squeezed the juice out of it. The result was a series of improvisations performed at their emotional maximum. Like Chaka Khan, whom Riney credits as an influence on his phrasing, the saxophonist worked only with broad splashes of primary colors.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1992 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIME
Saxophonist Sam Riney and trombonist Andy Martin go about the same thing in different ways. On "Talk to Me," Riney's latest album that's currently No. 16 on Billboard's contemporary jazz charts, the horn man with the bold sound solos fervently in a modern, electronically assisted setting enlivened by propulsive rock-based rhythms. Yet Riney says his early influences were such mainstream sax giants as Charlie Parker, Cannonball Adderly and Joe Henderson.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1991 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Electric bassist Max Bennett doesn't have a high opinion of a lot of the jazz he hears nowadays--just what you'd expect from a guy who once played with Charlie Parker. But Bennett isn't a be-bop purist, by any means. He was an integral part of saxophonist Tom Scott's groundbreaking fusion outfit, the L.A. Express, back in the '70s and has recorded with the Crusaders, Joni Mitchell, Quincy Jones, Frank Zappa and the Four Tops.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1997 | BILL KOHLHAASE
The 1997 Season: * June 13: Strunz & Farah * June 27: Jeff Lorber * July 4: Walter Beasley, Fattburger (6 p.m. only) * July 18: Jesse Cook * July 25: Larry Carlton * Aug. 1: Boney James * Aug. 15: Norman Brown * Aug. 22: Michael Paulo * Aug. 29: Spyro Gyra * Sept. 5: Braxton Bros., Nelson Rangell * Sept. 12: TBA * Sept. 19: David Benoit * Sept. 26: Sam Riney Concerts will be Fridays at 7 and 8:45 p.m., except as noted, at the Hyatt Newporter, 1107 Jamboree Road, Newport Beach.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
The music of saxophonist Sam Riney's group, Polychrome, is an intriguing reminder of the subtle importance of sound and texture in jazz. Rhythm, swing and improvisation may take star billing, but for many fans it is the unique sound of Charlie Parker, Louis Armstrong and the Duke Ellington Orchestra, to name only a few, that provides the music's most immediate stamp of recognition. On Saturday at Maxwell's, Polychrome played an opening set with similar potential.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1986 | DON HECKMAN
At first glimpse, pianist David Benoit comes across as your quintessential All-American boy--clean-cut and slim, with the offhanded innocence of a youngish David Steinberg. The music in his opening-night set Thursday at Concerts by the Sea did nothing to dispel the image. Leaning in toward his electronic grand piano with a kind of cool intensity, rocking back and forth with the funk-drenched beat, Benoit produced music that was bright, frothy, enthusiastic and totally contemporary.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1988 | JOY CHILDS
David Benoit has been riding a crest of popularity since his album "This Side Up" ascended the jazz charts in 1986. Performing selections from his latest offering, "Freedom at Midnight," and an as-yet-untitled new release at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano on Saturday, Benoit showed that he has moved a bit further away from his early "Beach Trails" release and is headed for higher ground.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
Like so many aspiring horn players today, Sam Riney has chosen not to concentrate on a single instrument and become its total master; instead, he changed horns with almost every tune. Possibly for this reason, or perhaps simply because it takes years to reach the requisite level of maturity, he has not yet acquired a distinctive personality. Performing at the weekly jazz brunch at the Hollywood Holiday Inn Sunday, Riney began on soprano saxophone.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1986 | ZAN STEWART
As an arranger, William Henderson writes dandy string backgrounds for jazzmen like Horace Silver and David Benoit. As a songwriter, he's got a ways to go. Henderson's 13-tune set Sunday at At My Place, featuring a 10-piece band with guest vocalists, was long on shine and short on emotional or musical content. Too many of the selections came off with a Las Vegas glitziness, and not enough with plain old soul. As there was good talent on hand, things could have been turned around.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1988 | DON HECKMAN and Like Stan Getz in the '50s, Sanborn's influence has flowed from his capacity to popularize. Both musicians developed playing styles that smoothed the edges of rich, aesthetically dense music identified with older black players into more easily grasped translations of the originals. In Getz's case, the earlier model was Lester Young; in Sanborn's, it was the blues-styled alto saxophonist Hank Crawford. Each translation fascinated more in its early manifestation than it has over the long haul.
David Sanborn may have been the most influential alto saxophonist of the '70s and early '80s. A generation of young players--Marc Russo (of the Yellowjackets), Brandon Fields and Sam Riney are only a few who come to mind--was deeply affected by Sanborn's soaring high notes and blues-honed melodies. Sunday night at the Pacific Amphitheatre in Costa Mesa, Sanborn displayed the present status of his skills firsthand before an enthusiastic capacity audience.
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